5 Photoshop Tricks You Don’t Know – Part 2

5 Photoshop Tricks You Don’t Know – Part 2

September 4, 2019 93 By Peter Engel


Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this video, I’m going to show you 5 Photoshop tricks that
you did not know, probably. This is, actually, Part 2 of my Photoshop
Tricks Series. Part 1 was one of the most popular videos on this YouTube channel and
a lot of people requested a second part. So this is what this video is all about. And
if you missed the first video, just look at the description down below. There’s going
to be a link to it there. And just like in the first video, I’m going to ask you to leave
a comment down below, simply telling me how many of the tricks you actually did know and
how many you didn’t know. Okay, let’s get started with the first Photoshop
trick. This is going to help people who are doing compositing. To illustrate how it works,
I have this very simple composition. I wanted to keep things simple and just focused on
the technique. So, we have this group that only has a model inside it and we have a background
layer. When you’re compositing, sometimes, you want to match the elements in the foreground
to the background. And that means, adding adjustment layers to help you match those
two together. So, in this case, we might want to add an adjustment layer to help us match
the foreground color to the background color, so we can add a color balance adjustment layer,
and, maybe, add a little bit of yellow, maybe add a little bit of red. But notice what happens
once we start adding these colors, this adjustment layer affects the entire image. And you’re probably thinking, “Well, why don’t
you just create a clipping mask so that the adjustment layer only affects the model. And,
yes, we can definitely do that. We can click on this button here or press Ctrl Alt G, Command
Option G on the Mac, to create a clipping mask. And at this point, any changes that
we make to this adjustment layer will only affect the layer right below it, which is
the model, in this case. Now, the problem comes into play when you have multiple objects
in a composite that you want to apply the same adjustment layer to. So, if I click on
the model layer and press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac, to Duplicate, now we have two
models. And I’m just going to press Ctrl T, Command T on the Mac, to Transform, and right
click on the layer, and flip it horizontally. So, now, we have twin sisters. In a more complex
composite, it won’t be the same duplicated image. You might have multiple layers. But,
to keep things simple, we’re just going to work with these two layers. Now, if you want to apply the same color balance
to the layer below it, you could, of course, duplicate this adjustment layer and clip it
to the model, but that would just create multiple adjustment layers that you really don’t need,
and, you, of course, Ctrl, Command Click, on the layer thumbnails to create a selection
around our models. In the second one, I held Ctrl and Shift to add to the selection while
clicking on the thumbnail, and then, we can just delete the Layer Mask and add a new Layer
Mask, which will add the adjustments to both models. It’s not working right now because
we have a clipping mask. If I unclip that mask, and I hold Alt and hover between two
layers, that’s Option on the Mac and Click, it will unclip it. Now it’s affecting the
two models. Now, this works fine unless we decide to move the model to a new location,
and, maybe, want to move this one back a little bit. Notice how now the adjustment is not
affecting this model. You can see that here. It’s affecting the original areas that we
selected. So, obviously, our mask wouldn’t work. And this is where the Photoshop trick I want
to show you comes into play. If you’ll click on the group, you’ll see that the Blending
Mode, by default, is Pass Through. That means that any adjustments that are made in this
layer will go through anything below it. If we simply switch the Pass Through Blending
Mode to Normal, you’ll see that this adjustment layer will only affect the contents of this
group. We can add another adjustment layer, for example, a Curves Adjustment Layer, and
I’m going to make an extreme adjustment here, so that you can see how it works. Notice how this adjustment only affected the
layers below it. And I can add as many adjustment layers as I want, and that adjustment layer
will only affect the contents of the group, simply by setting the group to normal. Remember,
default is Pass Through, which makes it so that the adjustment layers inside affect everything
below it. Normal only makes the adjustment layers affect the contents of that group.
And to kind of give you an idea of how this works, I want to duplicate the group. I want
to click on it and press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac. Then I’m going to disable the
one at the bottom, and I’m just going to press Ctrl E, Command E on the Mac, and that will
merge the group onto one layer. Notice that this is a single layer now and it’s set to
normal. That’s sort of what the Blending Mode does. It sort of flattens everything. Obviously,
with the group set to Normal, then work on non-destructively, you’re not flattening anything,
and you have the ability to edit the adjustment layers and move the contents around. I’m going to delete the woman copy here and
just keep the group. And I know that some of you may be thinking, “Well another way
of solving this issue might be by adding the adjustments outside of the group, selecting
them all, and pressing Ctrl Alt G, Command Option G on the Mac, to turn those layers
into a clipping mask for the group, and that certainly works, but if you’re running Photoshop
CS5 or earlier, you cannot clip adjustment layers onto a group. Also, in my opinion,
this is very unorganized, and if you wanted to keep things organized, you would need to
put those into yet another group, and, at least, in my opinion, this creates a whole
bunch of clutter. So I’m going to go ahead and Undo these changes, and I prefer to have
everything inside of a group with the Blend Mode set to Normal. And it makes things a
lot more organized and easier to work with. In the next trick, I’m going to show you how
to create a saturation map using a Selective Color Adjustment Layer. This trick will help
you composite objects into a scene by matching the saturation of each object. And, by the
way, this composite is simply a personal project I created just for fun, is based on the movie
“The Jungle Book.” If you want to find out more about how it was created or see what
stock images were used to create this composite, then you can check out my Behance page. Behance.net/JRfromPTC.
There’s going to be a link to it right below this video. Anyway, this is a flattened version, sort
of flattened version. The real composite, as you can see, has a whole bunch of layers.
But for this example, we’re just going to focus on a few layers to make things easier
to understand. When you’re compositing, you have to match a lot of things. You have to
match lighting, luminance values, colors, and, of course, saturation. If you look at
this image here, you can see that the background has a lot more saturation than the bear here.
And what I want to do is I want to disable this child layer and we’re just going to focus
on the bear and the background. So, if you want to match the saturation of two things,
you can use a saturation map to determine the saturation of the items in your scene. To create a saturation map, you can create
a new Selective Color Adjustment Layer. Now, click and drag that layer and put it above
everything else. Then, make sure that Absolute is selected. Then select Red and slide the
Black slider all the way to the left to negative 100. Do the same thing for all the other colors.
Then, with the Whites, Neutrals, and Blacks, slide the Black slider all the way to the
right to positive 100. And this creates your saturation map. Anything that is black or
dark has no or little saturation. Anything that is white or bright has a lot of saturation.
So, in this scene, you can see that the bear does not have a lot of saturation compared
to the background. If I disable the Selective Color Adjustment Layer, and we’ll just call
this saturation map, you can see that that’s true with the bear has little saturation,
and the background has a lot of it. If we click on the bear layer and add a Hue
and Saturation Adjustment Layer, and click on the Clipping Mask icon here, so that this
adjustment layer only affects the layer below it, you can see that if decrease the saturation
down to negative 100, so that the bear layer has no saturation, notice that the saturation
map now shows the bear being completely black. If I click and drag this all the way to the
right, the bear is very bright because it has a lot of saturation. Let me disable the
saturation map so that you can see how that looks. You can see the bear is highly saturated
there and on the other side is black and white. And, by the way, the reason it doesn’t look
black and white and that you see a little bit color is because we have some adjustment
layers here. So if I disable these adjustment layers that sort of color the image, you can
see it better. So, there it is. The bear is black and white. So I’m going to enable the saturation map
again. So when you’re compositing, you want to match the saturation of the items in your
image so that it looks cohesive. So, what you would do in this scenario is just add
as much saturation as needed, so that the bear matches the background, so then, you’re
sure looking at the luminance values here and sort of making them match. So, maybe,
you’re right about this level here, the bear will match the background. I’m going to disable
the saturation map and you will see. So this is before and this after. Now, you can actually
apply a Hue and Saturation Adjustment Layer to both the foreground and background. Have
this new Hue and Saturation layer only affect the layer below it. Enable the saturation
map again, and, maybe, the image is so saturated, so I would bring the saturation down of the
background, and then, click on the Hue and Saturation Adjustment Layer that controls
the bear layer, and bring that saturation down as well, and try to match the grays of
the bear with the grays around the area that it’s sitting in, so, maybe, something like
that. So I will disable my saturation map and that looks so much better. So, this is
before and this is after. Now, you don’t have to create a saturation
map every single time you’re compositing. You can just create it once, and then, click
on the fly out menu and choose Save Selected Color Preset, and you can call it saturation
map. It will appear under the Preset list. Notice that I have one created already. And,
by the way, this trick and the previous trick are two tricks that I showed in my upcoming
compositing training course. If you’re interested in the training course, look at the description.
There is a link to it there. This Photoshop trick deals with Blend Modes.
The special 8 Blend Modes and these are it right here—Color Burn, Linear Burn, Color
Dodge, Linear Dodge Add, Vivid Light, Linear Light, Hard Mix and Difference. These special
8 Blend Modes react differently when you bring down the Fill or the Opacity. All the other
Blend Modes are the same when you adjust either of these two sliders. To show you how these
works, I’m going to first show you one of the tips in my last five Photoshop Tips That
You Probably Didn’t Know video, and I think I’ll do a better job illustrating it this
time, since a lot of people seemed a little confused as to what that tip really was. So,
I’ll show you that tip again, and then, I’ll show you how it relates to the tip I’m showing
you now. So, I’m going to create a new layer and I’m
going to paint with white to create a specular highlight on this coin. And by the way, this
is a coin that I did for a tutorial. If you want to know how to create this from scratch
in Photoshop, just check out my tutorial here on YouTube. I’m going to put a link to it
on the description. So, I’m just going to paint with white using my Brush Tool. And,
actually, I’m going to make that a little bit whiter in the center, so, something like
that. It’s in its own layer and the tip that I showed last time was that by setting a layer
with white to Linear Dodge, then double clicking on that side of the layer to bring up the
Layer Style panel, you can make this look like a specular highlight by un-checking Transparency
Shape Layer; notice the difference. This is before and that’s after. So this check box makes this Blend Mode and
the other seven Blend Modes behave differently. So that was the tip that I showed in the last
video. The tip I’m showing in this video is that Opacity and Fill work differently with
those Blend Modes. So if I bring down the Opacity, you’ll see how that’s affected. We’re
here at 54% and notice how that looks like. It looks a little flat. It doesn’t look as
bright as it did before, but if I bring down the Fill, notice the difference. And we’re
at 55%, which is pretty close to what we had before, but look at the difference. You can
still see some of that hot light; it’s just not as bright. So, when you’re working with
these 8 Blend Modes, adjusting the Opacity and Fill give you different results. And just
so you know, the Opacity and Fill here are the same sliders as the ones that you saw
inside of the Blending Options in the Layer Style panel. Notice that when I drag the Fill
Opacity down here to 35%, 35% is shown here on the side. So, you can make your adjustments
here if you want to. So just remember that by using anyone of these 8 Blend Modes, you
can adjust the Opacity and Fill, and get different results. And, also, check the Transparency
Shapes Layer check box so that you get a different blend. And, usually, unchecking this check
box gives you a better blend. The next Photoshop trick deals with Paths
and Patterns. So we don’t know what a pattern is. I’m going to go ahead and create a new
Pattern Adjustment Layer just to show you what a pattern is. Photoshop comes with patterns.
This is the default list and there is more that you can choose from if you choose from
this fly out menu and select any one of these sets of patterns. But, anyway, they are all
essentially the same. You have a pattern, you can scale it and you can also click and
drag it around to place it anywhere in your canvas. Now, what you probably don’t know
is that you can actually fill a path with a pattern. So, let me show you how that works.
I’m going to create a path by clicking on the Pen Tool and selecting Path here in the
Options bar and I’m just going to create a path. And I’m going to press on the Escape
key when I’m done, and that’s my Path, right there. You can go into Window, Path, to bring
up your Paths panel and you can see it right there. There it is. I’m going to go back into the Layers panel
and create a new blank pixel layer and I’m going to go into Edit, Fill, and under Contents,
select Pattern. Then you can check on the script here and select Place along Path. Then
you can choose any pattern you like. So, maybe we can select something similar to the one
that we’re using before in the example. I think it was that one right there, and then,
press OK. In this window, you can then get to see Preview for that pattern; it’s going
to be placed along that path. So you can scale that pattern, you can increase or decrease
the spacing. You can also adjust the angle of the pattern, the distance from the path,
and if you uncheck Alternate Patterns, all the patterns move to one side. You can also
add color randomness to your patterns if you like, and brightness randomness. I’m going
to press OK. Now notice that the scale is so much bigger
than we saw in the previous. You have to keep that in mind that things don’t look exactly
as they do in the preview. And this is actually half of the tip. The other half is that you
can take advantage of this knowledge and create new patterns to help you with your design
work. So, for example, you can create a custom shape and select something like the cat paw
print. And, maybe, add some colors and styles to it. So I’m going to double click on the
side of the layer here to bring up the Layer Style panel and maybe add a Bevel and Emboss,
and, maybe, a Color Overlay. And the color will be, maybe brown, and the bevel and emboss
is facing down. Then we’ll increase the size a little bit, maybe something like this; maybe
add a little bit of texture and another Glow that we’ll set to Normal and choose Black
as our color and increase the Opacity a little bit, and the size a little bit. So there you
go. That’s our paw print right there. Now I can select the Marquee Tool and make
the selection around that paw print. Disable the background layer so we have transparency
and go into Edit, Define Pattern. And we’ll call this pattern paw print. Then hit Enter
or press OK, and I’m going to deselect that selection by pressing Ctrl D, Command D on
the Mac. I’m going to disable that layer, enable the background and create a new blank
layer. I’m going to make sure that my Path is selected and in that blank layer, I’m going
to go into Edit, Fill, and this time I want to choose a different pattern, and that’s
going to be the part that we created. Then I’m going to press OK. That’s going to bring
up that same window and you’ll get a preview of the pattern following that path. You can,
maybe, add a little bit more spacing to that. Bring the scale down a little bit and press
OK and see what you have. And there you go. We have these paw prints that are following
that path. Obviously, the turn here is a little sharp
and the paw prints need to be a little bit closer to the path. So I’m just going to Undo
that, Ctrl Alt Z, Command Option Z on the Mac, and go back into Edit, Fill, and press
OK. Now, I’m going to bring the paw prints closer to the Path and, maybe, increase the
spacing just a little bit. And, maybe, decrease the Scale a little bit as well, and press
OK. So that looks much better. And that’s how you will go about filling paths with custom
patterns that you create. Now, don’t let this little silly example fool you. This could
be a really powerful technique. You just got to be creative with the patterns that you
create and how you’re going to use them along that path. In the next trick, I’m going to show you how
you can take all these adjustment layers and turn them into one single adjustment that
can apply this very same effect to any other image that you want. Each one of these layers
helps to apply the overall effect that you see here. So this is before, and this is after.
Notice that some of these layers have different Blend Modes. This one’s a Color Blend Mode.
This one’s a Luminosity Blend Mode, and the others are the Normal Blend Mode. And what
we want to do is we want to be able to apply one adjustment layer that creates this very
same effect. But before I show you how to do that, I’m going to make this background
layer into a regular layer. So I’m going to double click on the Path here. And the reason
I’m doing this is so that the tip that I’m about to show you doesn’t work. But, first,
let me try it in case you run into that problem. So, I’m going to go into File, Export, Color
Lookup Tables. And immediately, Photoshop is going to tell me that I need a background
layer for this to work. So, if you don’t have a background layer, select the layer at the
very bottom, then go into Layer, New, Background from Layer, and that turns it into a background. Then, you can go into File, Export, Color
Lookup Tables. I’m going to use a Cube Format so I’ll make sure that Cube is selected and
I’m going to press OK. Then you can name your Lookup Table file. I’m just going to leave
that at default, which is the name of the document that I’m working with, then I’m going
to click on Save. Then, I’m going to create a New Color Lookup Adjustment Layer. I’m going
to click on Load LUT, the first option here. It’s going to open up a window and find the
file that you just created in your computer. For me, it’s right here. There it is. I’m
going to click on Load. Photoshop is going to take a second here and it’s going to load
that file. Notice that right now, the effect is a little
too strong and that’s because we have the original adjustments and we have the Color
Lookup Table layer that we just brought in. But if I disable the adjustment folder here,
you’ll see that the effect that we created earlier has been replicated by one single
adjustment layer—a Color Lookup Adjustment Layer. So this is with the single layer that
we created and this is with all those other layers. Notice that it’s exactly the same
thing. So, just keep in mind that if you apply the color effect to an image using multiple
adjustment layers, you can always export that as a single Color Lookup Table and you can
apply that same effect by using one single layer. Of course, with the Color Lookup Adjustment
Layer, you have Opacity and you have different Blend Modes that you can use. Unfortunately, you cannot edit the Color Lookup
Adjustment Layer. So, if you want to make any Edits, you have to go back to the original
adjustments and edit the layers from there. And I also want to point out that the file
that we created, the Look Up Table file that we created could be imported into any other
application that uses LUT files. So, applications like Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects,
and Adobe SpeedGrade, so you can apply this color effect to your video files as well. And those were the 5 Photoshop tricks you
did not know, probably. Now before I let you go. I want to show you two extra Easter eggs.
They won’t necessarily help you out in your workflow but they will make you really cool
around the office. There are two Easter eggs that Photoshop has—Toast and Bananas. First,
I’ll show you the toast. If you go into Edit, Preferences, or in the Mac, you need to go
to the Photoshop menu and Preferences, or you can press Ctrl K, Command K on the Mac
to bring up your Preferences panel. You can click on Interface and you can select the
color theme. The Easter egg is if you hold Alt Shift, Option Shift on the Mac, and click,
the icons turn into toast. We have white bread, and we have different shades of toasts. So
that’s how we get toast with Photoshop. I’m going to press Cancel and I’m going to show
you, now, how to get bananas with Photoshop. In Photoshop CC 2015, you got the ability
to edit the Photoshop Toolbar. So if you open up the Photoshop Toolbar editor by clicking
on these three dot icon, and then, click on the Edit Tool bar, or by going into Edit,
Toolbar, you’ll bring up the customizable tool bar menu here. If you hold Shift and
click on Done, notice what happens to the icon here. It turns into a banana. So, maybe,
you can go to your friend’s computer and turn his icon into a banana and freak him out.
And that’s it. I really hope that you enjoyed these Photoshop tricks, and I also hope that
you enjoyed the two Easter eggs. Let me know in the comments below how many of these tricks
were new to you and how many you knew already. Also, don’t forget to check out my Behance
page, my Instagram page, and if you’re interested in my upcoming compositing course, check out
the links right in the description. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that
you enjoyed it and that you learned something new. If you have any comments or questions,
leave them down below. If you enjoyed the tutorial, don’t forget to click that “Like”
button and share this video with a friend. If you haven’t already, subscribe to the Photoshop
Training Channel now. Thank you for watching and I’ll talk to you again soon.