Create and Apply Bokeh Overlays In Photoshop

Create and Apply Bokeh Overlays In Photoshop

August 18, 2019 100 By Peter Engel


Create and Apply Bokeh Overlays in Photoshop Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how
to create and apply bokeh overlays in Photoshop. We’re going to create these overlays by using
photos that you wouldn’t think would be good for much. We’re going to use these bad photos so that
you can see that you don’t need high-quality images to create good effects. By the way, if you’re new to the Photoshop
Training Channel, don’t forget to click on that Subscribe button for more free tutorials. Okay, let’s get started. We’re going to use this Adobe Stock image,
but feel free to follow along with your own image. The first thing that we’re going to do is
bring in the files that we’re going to use to create the bokeh overlays, so I’m going
to go into File, Place Embedded and I have these two files here. We’re going to start with the street. By the way, you can download these images
from my website PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. If you’re on YouTube, you can look at the
description for the link on this tutorial for my website. So I have this street image here. I will select it, click on Place. There it is. I want to click and drag the handles to stretch
the image out so that it matches the canvas. Notice that this image is just a very bad
photo of a street. This image actually came off my cell phone
and, as you can see, it’s not very exciting, but we’re going to use this image to create
the first bokeh overlay. Also, notice that this is a smart object. That means that we can apply filters and edit
them. So I’m going to go into Filter, Blur Gallery,
Fill Blur. Then I can increase the Fill Blur, so click
and drag on this slider and you can see how the image gets blurrier and I can start adding
the Light bokeh, and I can also add some bokeh color. And I can adjust the light range, so click
on the black point, click on the white point and just make the adjustments that you make
to make something that looks like this, then press OK. And you can see that this is a smart filter. If I double click on Blur Gallery, it brings
up the Blur Gallery again and I can make adjustments. I’m not going to do that, but I just wanted
to show you that you could if you wanted to, so I’m going to cancel this. Then I can click on this icon here to collapse
that filter so that it’s not on the way and it’s a little less confusing. We’re just looking at the two layers that
we’re working with and what I’m going to do now is change the blending mode to Screen. All the blending modes between this divider
and this divider hide dark pixels and reveal bright pixels, so watch what happens in this
dark area here. Screen—notice how that area is not really
affected. I want to bring it back to Normal, then I’m
going to create a new Levels Adjustment Layer and clip it to the layer below it, Ctrl Alt
G, Command Option G on the Mac. And then, I’m going to click the black point
here and drag it to the right. Now we only have these bright areas and the
rest of the image is black. Watch what happens when I select “street”
and change it to screen. The black pixels are invisible and we only
see the bright ones. So we can use this Levels Adjustment Layer
to control how the bokeh overlay looks so I can make some more adjustments; something
like this. So that’s before and after, and I can also
click on the street layer, create a layer mask by clicking on this icon, selecting the
Brush Tool and making sure that I have a Soft Brush, so Hardness is set to zero, and maybe
even a larger brush, maybe even larger than that. And I can start painting with black on the
items that I want to hide, so I thought that the highlight there was too bright and now
I’m using the bracket keys in the keyboard to increase the size of my brush, and I can
keep hiding the pixels that I don’t like, so that’s before and after. I’m holding Shift. If you Shift and click on the layer mask thumbnail,
you hide the layer mask; that’s what that red X indicates, so, now, I can select this
layer, hold Shift, click on the one on top, press Ctrl G, Command G to put those into
a group, and I can call this layer “Bokeh 1” and this is what we have so far; before
and after. Then I can go into File, Place Embed and bring
in this burger file, again, it’s a photo right off my cell phone. There’s nothing very exciting about it. In fact, it’s not a great image. It’s just a burger. It’s out of focus, but this is going to work
great to create a bokeh overlay. So, I’m going to go into Filter, Blur Gallery,
Fill Blur, and I can make similar adjustments to create similar effects, so adjust the blur,
then adjust the light bokeh, and maybe add more color, so something like this, and I’m
going to press OK. Once again I’m going to collapse the filter
just so we could see the layer that we’re working with and I’m going to change the Blend
Mode to Screen, and I think it looks OK. We need to make some adjustments. I don’t like this blue part here, maybe this
part is a little too bright, so I’m going to undo the blur. So what I’m going to do instead is I’m going
to copy the parts that I like and use that for my bokeh. So I’m going to select the Lasso Tool by using
L on the keyboard or you could just select the Lasso Tool from the Toolbar and this is
the area that I like right here, not the blue and I’m just going to duplicate it, Ctrl J,
Command J on the Mac. Notice that we’ve just duplicated that section
there, so then, I can press V on the keyboard and move this around, maybe place that here
so it covers that part. And I can also hold Alt, Option on the Mac,
click and drag to duplicate that other piece and hide whatever bright area I had up here. So, now, I can select all three layers by
holding Shift, clicking on the bottom one, so now, those three are selected. Then, I can press Ctrl E, Command E on the
Mac, or I can go into Layer, Merge Layers, so now it’s one single layer. And then, I can go into Filter, Blur Gallery,
Fill Blur, or I can just simply press Ctrl F since it was the last filter that I used,
and there you go. Now it looks much better. I can, now, change the Blend Mode to Screen
and this is the result that I get. I can create a Layer Mask again and hide the
pixels that I’m not happy with, so the bokeh here covering her face, so I’m going to select
the Brush Tool and paint with black in those areas. And I don’t want pressure sensitivity, so
I’m going to click on the Brush panel and under Shape Dynamics, notice how I have Pen
Pressure. I’m just going to disable that, so, in this
case, it looks better without the pen pressure; so there it is, before and after. I can also create a new Levels Adjustment
Layer to do what we did with the other layer or use something like Curves. It doesn’t really matter what adjustment layer
you use as long as you adjust the luminosity of the layer. So, I’m going to make the darker pixels darker
and make the brighter pixels brighter, essentially creating an S Curve to add more contrast;
so before and after. And, maybe, I need to click and drag this
point to the right here, and, of course, cut the two layers below it. I wasn’t using the Clipping Mask so that’s
affecting the entire layer. If I use a clipping mask it only affect the
bokeh layer, so before and after. I’m going to hold Shit and click on both layers,
Ctrl G, Command G on the Mac, and this will be “bokeh 2.” I can select that “bokeh 2” group and I can
press Ctrl J, Command J to duplicate it, and then, I can press Ctrl T, Command T on the
Mac, right click and choose Flip Horizontal, and then, I can move this around just so we
can add bokeh on the other side, and I can move it to whatever area that I like. I can even rotate it a little bit if I need
to. I’m just finding the right spot when I move
this just so you could see, so maybe right about there. And what I’m going to do is I’m going to hold
Alt, Option on the Mac, and click on the Layer Mask icon to hide everything, and I’m simply
going to paint with white on the areas that I want to reveal, so, maybe, some of that
bokeh there; careful on those sharp edges, so I’m going to paint with black to remove
that sharp edge, so that’s before and after. And I’m just going to change the name to “bokeh
3.” Notice that it really didn’t make a difference
in this case, applying the layer mask to the entire group or simply applying the layer
mask to the actual bokeh overlay, so it’s up to you where you apply the layer mask. What I’m going to do now is on the topmost
layer, I’m going to select it and create a new layer, and with white, I’m just going
to paint right in the center, like so. And this is going to be a sun flare that we’re
going to put on the top right. Then, I’m going to press Ctrl T, Command T,
to transform to get the transform handles. I’m going to hold Shift Alt, Shift Option
on the Mac, click and drag, and scale this up. Then, I’m going to press V on the keyboard
to move this over to the top right, right about here, and I’m going to double click
on this side of the layer to bring up the Layer Style panel, then I can go into the
Blending Modes and choose Linear Dodge Add. Watch what happens when I uncheck Transparency
Shapes Layers. See how it’s brighter and hotter? This is one of 8 blend modes that acts differently
when you uncheck this Transparency Shapes Layer. Also, the Opacity and Fill react differently. In this case, Fill will work better, so I’m
going to click and drag the Fill down to right about there; so it’s still hot and bright. Then I’m going to change the color by adding
a Hue and Saturation Adjustment Layer. Of course, I want to create a clipping mask
Ctrl Alt G, Command Option G on the Mac, so that I only affect this flare layer, and I’m
going to click on Colorize. Notice the bar here at the bottom. That’s the color that we’re going to be applying. If I click and drag the lightness to the left—make
it darker—you’ll see how the color is applied here. So that’s before and after. So let me make this more yellow with more
saturation. Something like that will work great, maybe
even bring down the Fill a bit more on the flare layer, or maybe even bring it up to
see what looks better. Yeah, maybe a little bit brighter. So, this is all subjective, of course, so
whatever looks better to your eye, so I’m just going to select these two layers, put
them into a group, Ctrl G, Command G on the Mac. There they are and I’m going to call this
group “Flare.” What I’m going to do now is click on the model
layer and we’re going to add a little bit of color to her, just so that it matches a
little bit better. I see a little bit of blue going on here and
a hint of blue right up top here, so I want to add some of that blue to the shadows on
her face just so there’s a little more interest. So I’m going to create a Selective Color Adjustment
Layer under Blacks, I’m going to add a little bit of cyan and subtract yellow to get blue;
something like that. Just so you know, these are the colors that
we can add or subtract. If we subtract the color, we get the opposite
color, so the opposite of cyan is red. The opposite of magenta is green. And the opposite of yellow is blue, which
is why when we click and drag to the left on the slider, we got blue. So it’s just a subtle effect, so that’s before
and that’s after. What I’m going to do now is sharpen the eyes
a little bit more, so I’m going to create a new layer and with the Sharpen Tool, I can
sharpen the eyes. Make sure that you have Sample All Layers
checked and that you’re in a new blank layer. And watch what happens when I use this tool
on her eyes to get really sharp, which is what I want. Unfortunately, that also adds some saturation
to the eyes and I don’t want that, so I’m going to zoom in just so you could see what’s
going to happen. So both eyes look the same but we’re only
going to focus on the left one, so that’s before and after. Notice how the colors change. I want the sharpness but not the color change,
so I’m going to change the Blend Mode to Luminosity and watch what happens with the color. See that? See how the color went down but we still have
the sharpness? So that’s what I’m going to use. I’m also going to bring the Opacity down to
zero and just bring it up accordingly, so, maybe 30% might be okay. So let me fit that to screen so we could see. That’s before and that’s after, and I think
that’s pretty good, so we’ll keep it there. I’m going to end the tutorial by adding some
noise and the way that I’m going to do that is by pressing Ctrl Alt Shift E, Command Option
Shift E on the Mac, to create a layer on top of everything that’s a combination of all
the layers below it, so, essentially, what that keyboard shortcut does is it merges everything
on to a new layer; so there it is. Then, I’m going to go into Filter, Blur, Lens
Blur, and we’re going to use the Lens Blur to add some noise and you got to make sure
that the radius is set to zero so that we don’t have any blur. You don’t want to add any blur at this point
so just make sure the radius is set to zero. You can just simply type zero on there. Then, I’m going to reduce the amount of noise
and I’m also going to zoom in just so that you could see what’s going on here. So look at the noise we have here. We have Uniform, Gaussian, Monochromatic. In this case, I’m going to uncheck Monochromatic
and keep it at Gaussian. I can click on this box and use the up and
down arrow keys in the keyboard to add noise or subtract noise. So I’m going to subtract noise and I think
right about two or three will be good. I’ll leave the amount set to 3 in this case,
and I’m going to press OK; so that’s before and after. I know you can’t really see it so I’m going
to zoom in—before and after. Fit to Screen and I’m just going to rename
my layers here. It’s a good idea to always rename your layers. So this layer here was the eye sharpening
so I’m just going to call it “eye sharpening” and the layer above that is the “noise.” I’m going to click on the noise layer, hold
Shift, click on the Selective Color Adjustment Layer, and then, press Ctrl G, Command G on
the Mac, to put that into a group. I can call this “bokeh overlays, and this
is before and after. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that you enjoyed it and that you learned
something new. Make sure that you leave all your comments
or questions down below. If you create an image using this tutorial
or any other of my tutorials, feel free to share it on Instagram with the hashtag #ptcvids. I often do a search for this hashtag to see
what you’re all up to. If I find your image, I would leave you a
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