Glass Window Reflection Effect In Photoshop

Glass Window Reflection Effect In Photoshop

August 15, 2019 77 By Peter Engel


Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how
to create a window reflection effect in Photoshop. The goal is to make it seem as if this woman
is sitting behind a glass window. Weíll create reflections, shadows, and highlights
to create the illusion of a real glass window. By the way, if you’re new to the Photoshop
Training Channel, don’t forget to click on the Subscribe button for more free tutorials. Okay, let’s get started. We’re going to be working with this document
here that contains three layers. Each of these images in this document is an
Adobe Stock image. You can look at the description to see where
you can download each file. You can download the free watermarked preview
or license a full resolution file to work with. We have this layer here, this woman checking
her phone, this busy city, and the dirty glass. We’re going to start out by enabling the busy
city and simply changing the Blend Mode from Normal to Lighten. This is going to create this effect here which
already sort of looks like a window. I want to bring the Opacity down. You can bring the opacity down by clicking
and dragging on the label, by clicking on the dropdown and selecting the value, or simply
pressing a number on the keyboard to represent that numerical value. So I’m just going to press 2 for 20% and that
looks pretty good. Now, I don’t really think this image requires
it, but I’m going to show you a technique that you can use in case your image is not
blending the way you would like it to. We have to remember that these blend modes
look at the luminosity values of the layer and use those luminance values to determine
how it’s going to blend with the layer below it. If we adjust the luminance values of this
layer, then, of course, the layer will blend differently. I can create a new Levels Adjustment layer
and clip it to the layer below it so that it only affects that layer. I want to press Ctrl Alt G, Command Option
G on the Mac. Now, notice this down pointing arrow. This is telling us that this adjustment layer
will only affect the layer below it. You could also click on this icon here to
enable or disable the clipping mask. Notice what happens when I start adjusting
these sliders. Notice how the reflection changes. So you can come in here and adjust how the
reflection is going to be applied to the image by simply dragging these sliders around. I want to click on this icon here to reset
the adjustment layer. I want you to realize one thing. All the Blend Modes that you see here from
this divider to this divider here, so between Lighten and Lighter Color are blend modes
that show bright pixels but hide dark pixels. So watch what happens if I click and drag
this over to the right. You’ll see that all the pixels start disappearing
because they’re now black, so they’re invisible in this blend mode, and the same thing will
happen if we make pixels brighterómore will show. But, anyway, I will reset this and I’m going
to actually delete the layer because I don’t really need it for this layer. I’m also going to show you a different technique. You can go into the Black and White Adjustment
Layer, which is going to turn everything black and white. But if I turn that into a clipping mask, Ctrl
Alt G, Command Option G, it will only affect the layer directly below it. Then we can use the Properties panel to control
the luminance values of individual colors. So, for example, the yellow here, I can click
and drag that over to the right and make this cab brighter or click and drag it over to
the left, to hide that cab. Now you really can’t see the colors because
this layer is set to Normal. If we change the Blend Mode to Luminosity
and drag this over to the left, now you’ll see the colors; so there it is. So you can come in here, make adjustments
as to how the reflection is going to interact with the background based on that individual
colors and their luminance values. So, as I mentioned before, I don’t really
need it for my particular image, but I just wanted to give you those options in case your
image is not blending the way that you intended it to. One thing that I will do to my image, however,
is duplicate it, so I’m going to press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac, to have a second
version of itóexactly the same thingóand what I’m going to do is I’m going to go into
Screen, which is a similar blend mode, and I’m going to turn the image black and white,
so I’m going to press Ctrl Shift U, Command Shift U on the Mac, so now I have a black
and white image. Now let me set it to Normal so you could see
it and bring it up to 100%. So there it is, that’s what it looks like
now. So I’m going to make this 20% again and change
the blend mode back to Screen, enable my other layers. So what I’m going to do now is enhance the
bright pixels. So I want to hide anything that is dark, so
I’m going to double click on the side of the layer here and just under this layer, I’m
going to click and drag this point over to the right. So, now, any point that is this shade of gray
or darker will be invisible. Notice the outline here. That’s too sharp. I want to smooth that out, so I’m going to
hold Alt, Option on the Mac, click, split those two in half, and then, separate them
to create a smoother transition. I’m going to press OK, and this is before
and that’s after, and, of course, I can bring down the Opacity to adjust it. I can alsoóbut that layer is selectedógo
into Image, Adjustment, Levels, and just make it darker in some areas and brighter in other
areas, like that, and maybe play around with the contrast, so, maybe, something like this,
and then, press OK; so that’s before and that’s after. That might be, again, too strong, so I’m going
to go to zero and just increase it just a little bit. I can actually click on this input box and
with the up arrow key, just go really slow until I find something that I like, so, maybe,
something like that. It just really makes those bright pixels pop. What I’m going to do now is create a Hue and
Saturation Adjustment Layer that is going to help me add a green tint to it just to
give it more of a glass effect. So, a Hue and Saturation Adjustment Layer,
select Colorize, then I’m going to click and drag this slider over to the rightóthe Hue
slideróright about here; somewhere around the greens, around 85 should be good. 25 and zero should be okay, then you can click
and drag the opacity down or just press 2 for 20% and that might be okay. Maybe we need a little more, so I’m going
to click inside the input box and use the up arrow keys to add just a little bit more,
maybe 25%; before and after. And now I’m going to enable the texture layer. And what I’m going to do now is use the Blend
If sliders that we used before, but this time we’re going to hide the bright pixels and
only keep the dark pixels. That way, we keep the dirt that’s going to
be on the window. So I’m going to double click on the side of
the layer to bring up the Layer Style Window and I’m going to click and drag this slider,
Bright Pixels slider to the left. Notice how it starts disappearing. At about this point, I’m going to hold Alt,
Option on the Mac, click, split those in half, and create a smoother transition; something
like that. Then, I’m going to adjust the Opacity, so
I’m going to click and drag this over to the left, and then, with the Up arrow key, let’s
bring some of that dirt. We’ll just go at 10% for now. I’m going to press OK. If I zoom in by pressing on the Z key and
tapping, you’ll see the result, so that’s before and after. It’s a very subtle effect. I don’t want it to be too noticeable. I just wanted a little bit of dirt on that
glass, so I’m going to Fit to Screen and, now, I’m going to add a new Gradient Adjustment
layer, and the gradient that I want is already selected. It’s the one that goes from foreground color
to transparent. My foreground color is black so it shows black. It’s this one here. If you don’t have it, you can double click
on the gradient. Make sure that the two stops at the bottom
are black and that the stop on the top right, when you click on it, reads zero on Opacity,
and then, you can click and drag this accordingly, and I just wanted it to be dark here at the
bottom, maybe bring the scale down a bit. Press OK; before and after. I think that might be a little too strong
so I’m going to bring down the Opacity just a little bit, maybe even more; so something
like this. Now I’m going to show you how to create some
highlights in the glass because maybe there’s lights shining on the glass, so I’m going
to add a new layer. I’m going to select the Brush Tool or you
can press B on the keyboard. This brush is way too big so I’m going to
hit the left bracket key on the keyboard to make it smalleróright about this big here. Make sure that you have a soft brush, set
it to zero. The size is not important. It’s going to vary depending on the size of
the image that you’re working with. Just make sure that the brush is not too big
so that no pixels go outside the edges, so you can actually make it quite small. So I’m going to make it about this size here
and, also, make sure that white is my foreground color; currently, it’s my background color,
but if I press X on the keyboard, I swap those. Notice how the foreground and background color
swap whenever I hit the X key. So with white, I’m going to tap once, and
there it is. That’s my highlight. I’m going to press V on the keyboard for the
Move Tool and I’m going to press Ctrl T, Command T, to transform, and I’m just going to scale
that up, like so. So that’s my highlight there and, now, I can
apply a color so that it looks better, so I’m going to go into the Hue and Saturation
Adjustment Layer, click and colorize, and also, clip it to the layer below it, Ctrl
Alt G, Command Option G on the Mac, or click on this icon here. And then, bring the lightness down so we can
see some of that color, and then, move the hue to the right, maybe right about here,
maybe add a little bit more saturation and something like that, just so it is that yellowish
color. I’m going to click on the Glow layer here
and that’s what I’ll call it. I’ll rename it, double click on it, and call
it “glow.” And I’m going to double click off the side
here to bring up the Layer Style window and what I’m going to do is I’m going to change
the blending mode. I’m going to go from Normal to Linear Dodge. Notice the difference. Then, under Transparency Shapes Layer, watch
what happens if I uncheck this check box. See how it changes? So I’m going to uncheck it so it blends a
little bit better and press OK. And with the Move Tool selected, I can click
and drag this and place it accordingly. So maybe I can place it up here, I can press
Ctrl T, Command T, to transform, and scale it even further, so maybe right up here somewhere,
just like a big bright highlight. And I can select the Glow Layer, the Hue and
Saturation Adjustment Layer that is giving it the color, press Ctrl G, Command G on the
Mac, to turn that into a group. With the group selected, I can hold Alt, Option
on the Mac, click and drag to duplicate it, so maybe have another highlight here at the
bottom, and I can place that accordingly. If the highlights are too bright, like the
one here at the bottom, I can open up the group, go into the Glow layer and bring down
the Fill. Linear Dodge is one of eight Blend Modes that
reacts differently when you change Opacity and Fill. In this case, Fill will give you a better
result, so I’m going to click and drag that down right about there. And maybe I can do the same thing for the
glow on the top; so this is with the highlights and without the highlights. Now that we’re at this point, you can go back
and make any final adjustments. I think, overall, the image is looking pretty
good. I can maybe come around and select the busy
city and the busy city copy, hold Shift, click on both, and move them around together, maybe
to find a better spot for the image. I think we were at a good location so I’m
not going to make any changes to that, but I just wanted to let you know that you could
do that at this point. What we’re going to do now is we’re going
to actually flatten everything into one layer so that we can apply a blur and some noise,
so I’m just going to select the group on top and press Ctrl Alt Shift E, Command Option
Shift E on the Mac, and that’s going to put everything into one layer. There it is at the very top. Then I can go into Filter, Blur, Lens Blur,
and we’re going to add just a little bit of blur, and I’m going to zoom in just so you
could see what’s going on. You can increase the radius to add more blur,
but we don’t need that much so I’m just going to bring it back down to, maybe, 7 and I’m
going to use the down arrow key on the keyboard to decrease the blur. Let me remove the noise for now just so we
can see without the noise. And I’m going to go back into the radius here
and start adding a little bit of blur, so maybe about 5 or 4. I’m going to stay at 4 in this case, and then,
I’m going to add noise. I’m going to click on here, on the input box,
hit the Up arrow key on the keyboard to add some noise, maybe two or three will work so,
I’m just going to stay at 3, and press OK. And this is one of my favorite filters to
add blur with because we can add blur, and then, add noise so that the images don’t look
too smooth. So I know that you probably can’t see the
before and after, so that’s before and that’s after. It’s very much the same unless we, of course,
zoom in and look at the before and the after. It’s a very subtle effect but I think it works. So I’m going to fit this to screen and I’m
going to select the top layer by clicking on it, and then, holding Shift and clicking
on the busy city layer, and pressing Ctrl G, Command G on the Mac, to put that into
a group, and that’s before and that’s after. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that you enjoyed it and that you learned
something new. Make sure that you leave all your comments
or questions down below. If you create an image using this tutorial
or any other of my tutorials, feel free to share it on Instagram with the hashtag #ptcvids. I often do a search for this hashtag to see
what you’re all up to. If I find your image, I would leave you a
comment. Also, don’t forget to subscribe and click
on that Like button. If you have a friend who you think will enjoy
this tutorial, please share this link with them now. Thank you for watching and I’ll talk to you
again soon.