Glazing Brushes featuring Jason Maranto

Glazing Brushes featuring Jason Maranto

September 27, 2019 1 By Peter Engel


Glazing Brushes featuring Jason Maranto Glazing is a new opacity modifier within Painter 2017,
and it’s going to give us control over our opacity on a per stroke basis. Now, there’s going to be some interesting interactions
with regular opacity that we’re going to look at later in the video but first I want to talk about what
the purpose of glazing is. Now as you can see here in this example that I’ve
colored right here. Now we’re getting very smooth transitions and
opacity, and I’ll go ahead and zoom in a bit more so that you can see these smooth transitions
and buildup in opacity. This is due to the glazing technology and it provides
you with a smoother buildup than anything that you were able to get in previous
versions of painter. Now, I’m going to go ahead and show you how this
works by coming over here; file, new, and opening a new default document, and I’m going to be using the glazing brush category
and the flat brush Now I’m just going to go and quickly pick a blue color
and just make a mark so that you can see how this glazing technology is
going to work. You can see I’m able to control the opacity here in
very smooth, very fine gradations. I’m going to explain to you why this is happening and
how we can modify the results that we’re getting. I’m going to go ahead and choose a dark color like
black. So that we can really focus in on what we’re getting
here, and I’m just going to make a mark and ctrl A +
backspace to clear that canvas. I’m going to come over here first of all, and I’m going
to go to; size, I’m going to click the dropdown, I’m going to change the spacing over to something like say 100 and just click here to accept that value. Then I want to come over here to opacity and I’m going to launch the opacity panel. You’re going to see there where we’re getting the opacity control panel. Go to the extended property bar and click this icon right here to launch the glazing control panel. Glazing works by controlling the way that the opacity of the dabs is building up over the course of the stroke. I want to come over here and set the expression of the glazing to “none” for right now, and I’m going to come over here to “expression of opacity” and set this to “pressure”, and what we’re going to see is the classic type of painter opacity. and what we’re going to see is the classic type of painter opacity. Whereas I’m pressing harder, I’m getting darker dabs. However, each dab is overlapping with previous dabs and even if I were to set the opacity fairly low, like 31%, if I just keep scrubbing over the same spot, you’ll see I eventually get the black. The reason why is because even though we have a low opacity, the overlapping dabs are allowed to build up until they get to a pure color, In this case, we’re using black. I’m going to set this back to 100% and set this over here to “none”. Now we’re getting a maximum value of 100% opacity for each dab with no changes based on pressure. However, if I come over here and I set the expression on our glazing to pressure, what you’re going to see is that we’re going to be getting something very similar in a sense that, as I press harder, we’re getting darker and darker dabs. However, there is no overlap and the reason why is because each dab is treated as 100% opaque and the glazing is controlling the opacity of those dabs over the course of the stroke. What this means is that I can stay in one spot and keep scrubbing like so and I don’t build up to appear black and the reason why is because it’s respecting the pressure of what I’m getting here. Now you can combine an expression for the opacity and the glazing, and we’re going to be getting kind of a middle result where, if I come over here and I set his now to pressure, what you’re going to see is that the dabs do overlap like they did before. However, I stay in one spot and I keep pressing. You can see that I’m reaching that maximum value of the glazing based on the pressure that I get a result that’s kind of like this. So the idea here is that we can have expressions or lower than 100% values for our opacity, we can have expressions or values lower than 100% for our glazing, or we can have both and you’re going to modify those based on the brush properties that you want. For most glazing brushes, what we’re going to want to start with is an expression of “none”, with an opacity of 100%, and a glazing value of 100%, with an expression of pressure so that we get a result that looks like this. If I come over here and reset this brush back to its default you can see this is the result that we get, and if we just change colors, you can see how that glazing works based on just how hard you press. Working with glazing modifies our dab opacity, but it’s going to be doing it on a per stroke basis.