Gravity Falls – Logo Tutorial (Photoshop)

Gravity Falls – Logo Tutorial (Photoshop)

September 18, 2019 10 By Peter Engel


Hello, friend! This tutorial will show you how to make a logo in the style of Gravity Falls. You’ll need a few things before we start. For starters, there’s Photoshop. I’m going to be using Creative Cloud 2015, but I believe the features i’ll be using go as far back as CS6. There are a few fonts you’ll need. The main one you’ll definitely need is ‘Gravitation Falls’ by MaxiGamer. If you want to replicate the rest of the stuff around the logo, you’ll need the following fonts: Waltograph, Old Press and MV Boli. MV Boli is included with Windows, so I don’t have a link for that one. But you might need to find a download if you’re using another OS, I’m not sure. The last thing you’ll need is a set of assets that I’ve made available in a MEGA or Google Drive folder. Links for all these things are available in
the description box. Open Photoshop and create a new document. To start with, I suggest you work in a 1920*1080 area. Select the Text tool and choose the
Gravitation Falls font. Now click on your document to start typing and write out whatever you want your logo text to say. I’m going with “Granny Fell Over” here because apparently that’s the first thing that popped into my head … Okay. It’ll be important to make this a contrasting colour for later, so I’ve set mine to a bright green. I’m also using 320-point text because that fills a decent portion of the document. After writing out my logo text and comparing it to the original logo, I decided the letters were a bit too wide, And I use the horizontal scaling property here to squeeze it down to 80% of the original width. One more thing to do is move the lowercase letters on the bottom line, So the tops of them are aligned with the top of their adjacent capital letters. To do this, select the required text, Choose the baseline shift property here: And change the value until it’s aligned properly. For 320-point text like I’m using, I found a baseline shift of 100 points worked well. Now that you have your text laid out, I suggest you warp it, as the original logo has some upwards curvature. Go to Edit – Transform – Warp. In this dropdown menu here, select ‘Arc’, and set the Bend Amount to somewhere between 10-15%. Confirm the change, then go to Edit – Transform – Rotate, And rotate your text to about -9º. Okay, we’ve finished messing with the text layout. Duplicate the text layer so you have it backed up in case you realise you’ve made some kind of horrible mistake. Right-click on the text layer and choose “New 3d Extrusion” The main 3D object’s properties should now be showing at the top right here. Turn off ‘Catch and Cast Shadows’, then go to the current view in the 3D scene settings, And change the camera mode to ‘Orthographic Projection’. Scale your text back up so it’s taking up more of the work space again like this: Now select the main 3D object again in the 3D scene toolbar. That’s the one which should have the same name as your logo text. And go to the coordinates section up here in the properties. Input the following angles: X=6º, Y=2.5º. Now go back to the main mesh properties with this button, and set the extrusion depth. If you’ve followed what I’ve done accurately, then I think 900 pixels looks about right. You’re free to experiment with any of these numbers if you think different numbers look better for your logo. From the tutorial assets folder linked in the description, Get the logo colours PNG and import it into your document. Put it out of the way in a corner or something, like I’ve done here. In the 3D toolbar, select the extrusion material element and change the diffuse material colour. Select the new colour by grabbing the orange from the logo colours PNG you just placed on your document. Select ‘Infinite Light 1’ that appears in the 3D panel, And go to its coordinate properties up
here. Set it to the following angles: X=-82º, Y=37º, Z=-40º. This should light up the lower right of your text. Now click down here to add a ‘New Infinite Light’. Its default settings are fine for me so you shouldn’t have to change anything. Now make sure you can see the ‘Layers’ toolbar again, and duplicate your 3D object. This will make sure it’s available for editing again if you want to change it later. Hide the duplicate layer. Speaking of changing the logo, if you want to change its text at this point, that’s still possible. Go back into the 3D toolbar, select the main 3D object, and choose this ‘Edit Source’ button. From here, you can alter the text that produced the 3D object, So you could technically use the file you have at this point as a partial template For making more logos like this. Phizzy:
“VERE GUD” Now, before we go on, I suggest you increase the image size of the document we’re working on. A higher resolution will help to retain good quality image, after the next few steps cause some aliased edges. Go to Image – Image Size. Make sure width and height are linked with this button, And set the horizontal width to 8192. This is the maximum size for an image with one of the export tools we’re about to use. Right-click on your 3D layer and select ‘Rasterise 3D’. Now go to File – Export – Save for Web (Legacy). It won’t say ‘Legacy’ in older versions of Photoshop. In this box, change the setting to ‘PNG8’, and turn off Dithering here: Click this button, and choose ‘Select All Colours’. Ctrl-click on the transparent colour, and then click the Delete button to clear the colour table. Now switch to the ‘Original’ view at the top left, Use the eyedropper to select each colour from the ‘Logo Colours’ PNG you placed on the document earlier, And add them to the colour table. When you switch back to the ‘Optimised’ view, you should have a clean, two-colour image. Save the result. Now choose the Magic Wand Selection tool, set the Tolerance to 32, Switch off anti-aliasing, and untick ‘Contiguous’. Click on the front face of your text to select it with these settings, And go to Layer – New Via Copy. Make sure your new ‘Text Front Face’ layer is the only thing that’s visible, and export this as a PNG. Open the PNG you just exported in Photoshop. Then import your orange background text image over the top of that. You have to do it in that order, or you’ll be stuck with the limited orange colour palette. Reorder the layers so the orange layer is at the bottom. Rasterise the orange layer, And select and delete the logo colours in the corner if they were exported with the rest of the image Now, if you have rounded letters like I do here, To make them soft shaded (like the G in the original logo), We’re going to have to make a quick manual edit. Ctrl-click on the orange layer to select its visible pixels. Now click on the Polygonal Lasso Selection tool, And start a negative selection by holding the Alt key when you click to start your selection. You want to make it so that the only part of the image that’s left selected is a chunk about this size, Where you’re going to add some smooth shading. Make sure the edge of the selection follows the angle of the shading. It doesn’t matter if you select too much of the area behind the face text, Since that will be covered up anyway. Now select the gradient tool and make a new colour gradient that looks like this. Orange to black, 100% opacity at both ends, using the colours that are on the orange background image. Now just click and drag to define the direction of the gradient And release to gradient-fill the area. Repeat what you’ve just done for any other areas that require smooth shading. Now we’re going to add outlines to the
layers. Right-click on the orange layer and select ‘Blending Options’. Select ‘Stroke’, make it black, ‘Outside’, with ‘Normal’ blending, And if your document width is still set to 8192 like I suggested earlier, Then I think 50 pixels looks about right. Apply the same stroke to the green text
layer. Now import the ‘Logo Mask’ PNG from the assets folder in the description. Hold shift and resize it so it covers at least the whole green text part of the logo. Place it, make sure this layer is above the green text layer, Then right-click on the layer and choose ‘Create Clipping Mask’. You can reposition it at this point to make sure it looks good. Incidentally, if you’re not happy with this logo mask, You can either make your own, or use the other one that’s available online. For the final touch, go to the green text layer’s blending options again and add another stroke. This needs similar settings to the first stroke, but set it to ‘Inside’ instead of ‘Outside’, And set the colour to a white colour sampled from the top of the logo mask. I decided to make this stroke a bit thinner than the black outline, so I set its size to 40 pixels at this resolution. Export your finished logo as a PNG. If you just needed the logo with a transparent background then you’re done. I’m going to outline a few more steps for the logo background and credits though. Open the ‘Blank Logo Background’ image from the mega folder in Photoshop, And import your finished logo on top of it. Scale it and place it in the middle of your document. Another helpful thing you should import is the ‘Credit colours’ PNG from the assets folder in the description. Put that in a corner somewhere. Now select the Text tool. We’re going to recreate the Disney logo first, so choose the ‘Waltograph Regular’ font. Use the left colour from the Credit Colours PNG, and write whatever you want. I’m putting my name in this one. 100-120 point text seems about right at this resolution. Make sure the other scaling options and baseline shift setting have been put back to normal, Or the text might look a bit weird. For the ‘Created By’ text, use the MV Boli font, the middle colour from the Credit Colours PNG, and make it bold. Finally, for the creator credit, use the ‘Old Press’ font, Use the right colour from the Credit Colors PNG, and make sure bold is switched off. Or this text’s defining effect will not be
shown At this point, I realised it would be funny if the granny was ‘pushed by’ Alex Hirsch, rather than just ‘created by’, So there you go. If you like, you can add a Drop Shadow to the two bits of text at the bottom, as I’m doing here. And that’s it! Export your final logo on its background and we’ve finished. Thank you for watching my little tutorial, I hope someone finds it helpful. Remember to press all of the positive YouTube buttons, Tell your friends about this video if they’re also weird Gravity Falls fans, all that stuff. Okay, have a lovely time! Good bye!