How To Automatically Crop and Straighten Multiple Scanned Photos in Photoshop

How To Automatically Crop and Straighten Multiple Scanned Photos in Photoshop

August 16, 2019 21 By Peter Engel


Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this video, I will show you how you can
use Photoshop’s crop and straightening command to quickly and easily crop multiple scanned
images into their own individual files. I’ll also take the time to show you how to fake
some of the most common issues that arise when scanning images into Photoshop. Okay, let’s get started. We’re going to work
with this file which contains three scanned photographs, and to quickly and easily crop
them, straighten them, and place them in their own individual files, we’re going to use Photoshop
Automation Tools. I’m going to go into File, Automate, Crop, and Straighten Photos. Photoshop
will then crop and straighten the photos in that image. We have the three tabs here; one,
two and three. As you can see, this was a quick and easy thing to do. Now, when you’re
looking at the photo, you may want to choose a different view. For example, you may want
to arrange the tabs Four Up, so we can see them all at the same time, or, maybe, you
just want to have floating windows, and you can arrange them accordingly. Now, that’s
all personal preference, of course. I’m going to go back into Window, Arrange,
Consolidate all two tabs. I like working with tabs better, but you may have a different
preference. So now that we have the photos, we can adjust them accordingly. For example,
you might notice that this photo, here, has some of the white outlines there. That’s very
easy to remove. You can do several things. You can click on the Crop Tool, hold Shift,
click and drag one of the corner handles, and, then, press Enter, and that’s going to
crop that area out. Another thing that you can do is use the Spot Healing Brush Tool
and use the right bracket key on the keyboard to make the brush bigger, and, then, paint
on those edges using Content Aware, and Photoshop will fill in those areas. If you’re working with a photo, and, maybe,
that photo has a missing piece; so let me just fake that. I’m going to make a selection
and fill it with white. Ctrl D, Command D to Deselect. So, now, this photo has a piece
missing. You can actually use the Fill Content Aware Command to generate the pixels. So I’m
going to click and drag, and make a selection around that. Then, I’m going to go into Edit,
Fill, Content, choose Content Aware, press OK. Photoshop is going to fill that in. You
may not get it right the first time. If you don’t, just make another selection with the
pixels that don’t look right to you, and, then, do it again; Edit, Fill, Content Aware.
And if you think you need to do it one more time, then go ahead and do that the third
time. This time I’m going to hold the Shift and Backspace to bring up the Fill Menu, and,
then, press OK, Ctrl D, Command D to Deselect, and that looks much better. Another thing that you may come across is
some of the old Polaroid photos and you can decide to keep the white outline, or you can
crop that in, and it’s very easy to crop. Just select the Crop Tool and match the edges
yourself, and, then, press Enter. I’m going to Zoom In just so we can see this image a
little bit better. I’m holding Alt and scrolling up on the mouse wheel, and since this video
is all about using the automation tools to crop and straighten, we’ll also use the auto
tools to adjust Color, Contrast, and Tone. You can, of course, adjust the colors by going
into Image, and using one of the three auto commands here. So, in this particular image,
one of the things you may want to do is adjust the colors, so click on Auto Color. You can
also press Shift, Ctrl B, Shift Command B on the Mac; Auto Color. And that adjusts the
colors of the image. If you’re unhappy with the results, you can go into Edit, Fade, Auto
Color, or press Shift, Ctrl F, Shift Command F on the Mac, and in the Fade Command window,
you can bring down the Opacity of that effect, or you can also use a different Blend Mode.
In this case, I like the colors, but maybe the image is a little bit too dark. So I’m
going to use a different Blend Mode to keep the colors, but bring back the old luminance
values. So I’m going to go into Mode and select Color. So that keeps the new colors, but brings
up the old luminance values, then I’m going to press OK. Now that I’m looking at the image, this maybe
a little bit too bright, so I’m going to go into Image, Auto Contrast. Again, the image
is darker than I would like it to be, so I’m just going to go into Edit, Fade Auto Contrast,
and bring the Opacity down a little bit, right about there, and, then, press OK. Now, you
may come across an image that has a different problem. This image is showing portrait style
but it needs to be landscape. To fix that, we can just go into Image, Image Rotation,
90 degrees Clockwise, and, then, rotate the image. You can see some of the white here,
so we can fix that by just cropping it a little bit, just a tiny bit, and, then, the white
edges are gone. You can, of course, apply any of the Auto Color commands if you want
to, but I’m not going to do that in this case. We’re going to come back into the image that
we started with and we’re going to talk about one other issue that you may come up with
when scanning images and that is noise. Notice how this image has a lot of noise. There’s
not too much that you can do in a lot of cases, but you can certainly improve it. So I’m going
to Zoom In just so we can see what kind of noise we’re dealing with, and notice that
this noise has some color in there. And we’re going to use some of the Photoshop filters
to try to make it just a little bit better. But, before I do that, I’m just going to go
into Auto Color and Auto Tone. So this is what our image looks like now. I’m going to
Zoom In and, obviously, the noise is still there. So, what I’m going to do first is go
into Filter, Noise, Reduce Noise. And this filter is going to help us reduce some of
that noise. So, the first thing I’m going to do is just bring down the sliders here
to the left, so you can see what the image looks like with nothing applied to it. So,
there it is. And, obviously, I have the Preview checkbox enabled, and I’m just going to start
out by increasing the strength all the way up just to see what it looks like. And in this particular case, dragging the
strength up to 10 doesn’t seem to damage the image in terms of losing detail in detail
areas, simply because we really can’t see, for example, her lips, her eyes, are really
not there, even at zero you really can’t see them, so we’re okay going all the way up to
try to reduce some noise. So I’m going to click on the checkbox and you see how that
removes a little bit of noise. Then, you can also reduce the Color Noise.
Notice how we have some Color Noise here. Watch what happens when I drag this slider
over to the right. I’m just going to drag it all the way to the right again, just so
you can see the difference. Look at the brown hair. If I disable the Preview checkbox, you
can see that that noise has some color. If I enable it, that color is gone. So I do want
to remove the Color Noise from this image. Again, in this case, using the strength of
10 and 100% here works. In your image, you may need to bring the strength down a little
down a little bit, and, also, bring the Color Noise back a bit. It all depends on your image.
In this particular case, I don’t have a lot of detail to preserve, so, actually, preserving
the detail brings back noise in areas that really don’t require it, so I’m just going
to leave this at zero. So this looks good for now. I’m going to press OK. At this point, this maybe all that I can do,
but I could try one other thing and see how it looks. I want to go into Filter, Blur,
Surface Blur, and this blur allows you to blur but it leaves the edges intact. So notice
here on the chair how the edges are intact; the inside and the outside. In this case,
you really can’t tell because its white highlight are what’s being blurred, not the edges. So,
again, you can just bring this down to zero. So to see the before and the after, you can
start increasing the threshold, maybe, 10 levels, and you can see before and after.
So we’re definitely getting rid of a lot of the noise that’s here on the chair. It’s not
affecting her face too much, and, then, I can press OK. This looks good. I’m going to
Zoom Out, and that’s what our image looks like. If I go into Window, History, I can
come back right here, Auto Tone, so, before and after; so, certainly, a lot less noise.
Obviously there’s a whole lot of other problems and issues that may arise when scanning images
into Photoshop, but these are some of the most common problems that you’ll have, and
just a few ways in how to fix them. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that
you enjoyed it and that you learned something new. If you have any comments or questions,
leave them down below. If you enjoy the tutorial, don’t forget to click that Like button and
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Channel now. Thank you for watching and I’ll talk to you again soon.