How To Create a Pencil Drawing From a Photo In Photoshop – Line Drawing Effect

How To Create a Pencil Drawing From a Photo In Photoshop – Line Drawing Effect

August 6, 2019 100 By Peter Engel


Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Twitter @JRfromPTC. In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how
to create a line drawing from a photo in Photoshop. We’ll start out with the same stock photo
that I used for the Mockingjay Movie Poster Tutorial, and we’ll apply a few effects to
give it that pencil drawing look. This effect is actually very straightforward. You can
apply it to almost any image, but keep in mind that it will look better when you have
a subject with a white background. Also, you can follow along with me if you like, but
if you’re using your own image, you may have to enter different values on the filters that
we apply, so that they work on your photo. Okay, let’s get started. The first thing that
I’m going to do is I will click on the background and I’m going to Click and Drag it over to
the New Layer icon. Then, I’m going to create a new Black & White Adjustment Layer. This
is going to turn everything black and white. I don’t need their properties, so I’m just
going to click on the double sided arrow to collapse the panel, then on the background
copy, I’m going to switch the Blending Mode to Color Dodge. And what Color Dodge does
is it creates a stronger or more contrasted version of Screen. If I go into Screen, you’ll
see what that creates; Color Dodge, similar to screen, but more contrast. Then, I’m going
to invert the colors. That means that the light colors will become dark, and the dark
colors will become light. And you can do so by pressing Ctrl I on the keyboard, or by
going into Image, Adjustment, Invert, but Ctrl I, or Command I on the Mac, is much faster. And you’ll notice what happens. Everything
sort of disappears, except for the black pixels. If I come back into Screen, you’ll see what
that does. It essentially washes everything out because only the light colors are showing,
but if you intensify that effect, everything is gone, except for the really, really dark
pixels. What I’m going to do now is I’m going to double click on the layer, click on Convert
to Smart Object. If you’re using a version of Photoshop that does not have Smart Objects,
you don’t have to worry about this step. The only reason I’m creating a Smart Object is
so that I can have Smart Filters and I can edit them later, but you don’t have to do
that. You can just go into Filter, Blur, Gaussian Blur, and create the blur without a Smart
Object, and I’ll show you why a Smart Object is beneficial. But anyway, when you start blurring the image,
you’ll start seeing the outline of the image come back, and this is what’s going to create
the basis of our line drawing. And the radius that you should select is whatever looks good
for your image. All the effects that I’m going to show you today and the filters will have
different settings if you’re using a different photograph, or if you want to get a different
effect. So don’t be so specific about the settings that I use. Just look at the technique
and adjust the settings accordingly to your image. For this image, somewhere around, maybe,
1.9 or rounder. It looks like it will work. I get a lot of details on the face, and on
the jacket. Some of these lines are too dark, but I think I can work with them. So I’m just
going to leave the radius at 1.9 for now, and I’m going to press OK. You can see that
the Gaussian Blur was applied to the Smart Filter, and the reason I created a Smart Object
was that I could double click on the Gaussian Blur Smart Filter to come back into the Gaussian
Blur window, and adjust the effect, if necessary. I’m not going to do that but I just wanted
to give you that option, in case you needed to make adjustments down the line. I’m going
to click on this up pointing arrow to collapse the Smart Filters, just to give it a little
more room. At this point, you might want to call this
done, depending on the effect that you want to achieve. But we want to create a much more
realistic effect, so I’m going to show you a few filters that are going to help us achieve
that goal. I’m going to click on the background copy, instead of clicking and dragging it
to the New Layer icon. This time I’m going to press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac, which
duplicates the layer. I’m going to Click and Drag it to the very top. Now, I’m going to
go into Image, Adjustments, Desaturate, which desaturates the image. Then I’m going to go
into Filter, Filter Gallery, and I’m going to select Stylize, Glowing Edges. And this
is going to help us create an outline around an image that is going to mimic pencil lines,
and you can play with the Edge Width to get the width that is appropriate for the look
that you’re going for, the Edge Brightness, and the Smoothness. For me, Edge Width of
1, Edge Brightness of 4, and Smoothness of 5 works. I’m going to press OK. Now the lines are white and the background
is black. I want the opposite, and we already know how to invert colors. We did it just
a minute ago. So I’m going to press Ctrl I, Command I on the Mac, to invert this layer.
Then, I’m going to use a Blend Mode to get rid of the white pixels and keep the black.
To do so, I’m going to go into Multiply. Multiply makes the white pixels invisible and it makes
the black pixels visible. So, now, I have an outline from our drawing. What I’m going
to do now is I want to create some shading around my drawing, but I want to use something
that looks like pencil wax. To do so, I’m going to click on the background layer, again.
Press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac. Click and Drag that duplicate all the way to the
top. We’re going to Desaturate it. This time, I’m just going to press Ctrl Shift U, that’s
Command Shift U on the Mac, and if you forgot, you can also get to that by going into Adjustments,
and Desaturate. The shortcut’s right here. Now I’m going to apply a different filter.
So I’m going to go into Filter, Filter Gallery, and this time, I’m going to apply one of the
filters found in the Sketch Section, and I’m going to choose Charcoal, and that’s going
to create this sketching effect; looks a lot like pencil lines, and that’s what I want
to use—Charcoal Thickness 1, Detail 4, Light and Darkness 48. Again, you might want to
play with these settings to get a different look on your image if you’re going for something
different. Press OK when you’re done. This time, we don’t need to do any inversion, but
we do need to get rid of the white and keep the black. So, we’re going to change the Blend
Mode to Multiply, and we get this effect. And now we have the original line drawing
with some extra lines to help us define the drawing a bit more and these etch lines that
make it look a lot like a pencil drawing. If I Zoom In, I’m going to select the Zoom
Tool by pressing Z on the keyboard, and I’m just going to Zoom In, and you can see how
this looks a lot like a drawing already. The problem that I see is that I lost a lot
of details in the eyes, so I want to bring some of that detail back. I’m going to press
B on the keyboard to bring up my Brush Tool, then I’m going to make the brush a little
bit bigger, so, maybe, something about this big. And what I’m going to do now is I’m just
going to paint with black on the Layer Mask. I haven’t created a Layer Mask yet, so I’m
going to create on this Layer Mask icon to add a Layer Mask, and if you will remember,
when you paint with black on the Layer Mask, it hides the pixels that are selected. I’m
going to press X to press the foreground and background colors. The foreground color is
now black, and if I paint with black on the Layer Mask, it hides the pixels that were
there before. And I’m going to do the same thing on this side. And, maybe, if I have
a smaller brush, we can create a better defined eye later, and, maybe, make it bigger again. By the way, I’m using the bracket keys on
the keyboard to adjust the brush size. I’m going to Zoom Out by holding the Alt and using
the mouse wheel, just to see the effect that I have, and I don’t like how this eye—the
right eye—is looking, so, maybe, I’ll hide that entire area, and maybe, this area, too.
And we’re going to work with this a little later on, to give it more definition. So,
I’m using Mask to hide the filters that I’m not happy with. And you could do that with
the rest of the image. I’m not going to for this tutorial. I’m just going to do the eyes,
but, at least, you know the technique, so you can apply it to your image. What I’m going
to do now is add one more layer. This time, I’m going to use the Wacom tablet to draw.
If you don’t have one, don’t worry. I’m going to show you how you can apply these effects
with the mouse first. And what I’m going to do is I want to just create some lines around
the image to further enhance the effect of a pencil drawing. What you want to do if you’re
using a mouse, is get a really small brush, maybe, 1 or 2 pixels. We’ll start with 1 and
see how that looks, and I’m just going to paint. That looks pretty good, but maybe the
Opacity is too much. I’m going to bring that down to, maybe, 56%, and I’ll probably bring
the Flow down and I’m going to paint now. And that’s looking much better. This is looking more like the pencil lines
that you see here, so I’m just going to press Ctrl Alt Z, Command Option Z on the Mac, to
Undo, and I’m going to Zoom In to the image, and I’m just going to start painting in some
areas. And now that I’m painting on it, I actually think it’s too dark, and I’m going
to get rid of those lines by pressing Ctrl Alt Z, Command Option Z on the Mac, and, maybe,
bring the Opacity down even further, maybe 35%. And now that I’m painting, I’m sort of
liking it better. So now I’m creating lines in here. I’m filling in areas that I think
need detail, maybe, like the earlobe here. Here it needs a little more detail, and it’s
okay if you don’t draw perfectly. This is more of a sketch look, so it’s okay if you
go over the lines and, you know, you have the hand drawing look. That’s what we’re going
for. So, just as you can see, I’m just simply painting with the mouse. I’m not using my
Wacom tablet yet. So that’s how you would do this technique using the mouse. Now, obviously, if you have a Wacom tablet,
it’s a lot easier, and not only because it’s easier to draw with a pen, but you have pressure
sensitivity. So I’m going to bring the Flow all the way to 100%, Opacity 100%, and if
you use a Wacom tablet, make sure this button is pressed, so you can use pressure sensitivity
when you draw. So I’m not really going to draw too much. What I want to do is, actually,
do two things. I want to enhance the hand drawn look, and I want to fix areas that don’t
have a lot of detail. So, for example, I can come into the nose here, and, maybe, add–
We’ll help enhance the nose, like so. What I’m also going to do is in areas where there’s
shadows, maybe I want to apply some lines that look hand drawn, like so. And I’m not
doing too much. I’m essentially scribbling on these areas just to make it hand drawn.
So, got a little more detail in the ears, maybe, come back and work on the eyes a little
bit. Make the eyelash a little bit darker, and I’m going to go a little bit faster. All I’m really doing is creating this hand
drawn look on the edges here, just to make it a little more realistic. Also, in areas
like the hair down here, I can, maybe, do something like this, to make the hair stand
out a little bit better. And, again, in areas where the shadows may withdraw, more lines
that look hand drawn, like that. And I’m not doing too much, as you can see. And, something
you may want to do on edges like this, maybe you extend the lines out and it looks more
like a hand drawing. As you look through your image, you may find areas like this where
the filter didn’t do that good of a job, so you may want to hide it by just painting over
it, like so. And, obviously, the more time that you spend, the better results that you
get; but you get the idea. One thing that I am going to do is in areas
like this where there’s not a lot of detail. I can come in, and just paint a line along
the edge, just to give it more definition. And, again, in these areas, I’m just going
to do some very, very light strokes here. And if you’re thinking to yourself, in areas
like this, it’s going to be really hard with the mouse, and yeah, it is. It’s obviously
a lot harder to draw with the mouse than it is with the Wacom tablet. But it can be done,
you just got to take your time. In areas like this, I’m just going to go the opposite direction
of the strokes. That way, it looks a little more like a hand drawing, and again, create
those edges there. And I’m not going to take too much more time because I think the filter
did a really good job, but I just wanted you to see how you can further enhance the image
if you needed to. I’m going to double click on the Zoom Tool, just to go to 100% and you
can see our final drawing there, and once you have everything completed, one thing you
may want to do is this. I’m going to add a new solid color, and I’m just going to make
it white. I’m going to disable this layer and I’m going to go to the Channels Panel
and I’m going to select anyone of these panels. It doesn’t really matter which one, they’re
all the same. We’re working with a black and white image, so they’re all going to be 100%
the same. So choose one, Click and Drag it over onto the new channel icon to duplicate
it. Select it, and then, press Ctrl I on the keyboard, Command I on the Mac, to Invert. Now, we’re going to create a selection out
of the light pixels, which are the pencil marks. I’m going to press Ctrl, Command on
the Mac, click on the channel copy thumbnail to make a selection around those light pixels,
come back into the Layers Panel, enable the White Color Fill, and select another solid
color. You can choose black if you want to, but you can also choose a different color,
maybe, you had a drawing with a blue pen, or something like that. I’m just going to
select the dark gray and press OK. Now, the image is being created just by this solid
color and this Layer Mask. If I hold Alt, Option on the Mac, and click on the Layer
Mask icon, you’ll see what the Layer Mask looks like. I’m going to hold Alt, and click
on the Layer Mask icon again. Now, if you want to make any further adjustments at this
point, you will have to make them on the Layer Mask, but I recommend making all the adjustments
before you get to this point. That way, what you see in the Layer Mask is the finished
product. And, of course, you can change the color of the background, which is white to
something else, or, maybe, add a paper texture or something like that, to make things more
realistic. And that’s it for this tutorial. If you have
any comments or questions, please leave them down below. If you found this video useful,
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Thanks for watching and I’ll talk to you again, soon.