How to make Photoshop 3D text logos, lighting, materials & cameras – Adobe Photoshop CC 2018

How to make Photoshop 3D text logos, lighting, materials & cameras – Adobe Photoshop CC 2018

August 17, 2019 2 By Peter Engel


Hi there, before we get started,
this video here, it’s quite long. I want to cover at the beginning here
what we’re actually going to do. So these are some of the things
we’re going to create. We’ll use text, and make it 3D,
we’ll do the same thing for logos. We’ll export different materials here. Perspex, kind of plastic and glass. I’ll show you how to cast shadows. Working with lights, and adjusting
a camera, and its angle. We’ll also explore some easy,
fake 3D, like this option here. Looks 3D, but really is just a little
easy trick we can do in Photoshop. This is a hand drawn word. This one here is done with a path,
or a vector shape you can trace. So there’s lots of things to explore here
in this Photoshop 3D video. What I’m going to do is pass you over
to the real live version of myself… to explain a little bit more
on how to get started. Hi there, my name is Dan. There are exercise files for this video. So you can play along, you can download
them free from the link in the description. Just note that it’s an extract from
my longer Photoshop Advanced course. If you want to check
out the full course… there’ll be a link in the
description as well. All right, get in there.
Enjoy the class. Hi there, welcome to the 3D section
of the Photoshop Advanced course. In the next few videos we are going
to explore how to make things 3D… extrude them like the text here. We’ll work with different materials,
like up here… glass, and plastics, and perspex. We’ll export cameras,
we’ll export lighting, shadows. Just so you know, this is I guess,
still an introduction. Not a super quick one, but know that
3D in Photoshop is quite a big topic. We could spend 50 videos on it. Hopefully here, this will get you going. It will let you create the
majority of the stuff… most designers and photographers
want to do with 3D. Let’s get started with the first video. To get started let’s open up ‘Wood
Background’ from our ’15 3D’ folder. You can work with any image.
Let’s click ‘Open’. Now before we get started we’re
just got to make sure… you actually have 3D in
your version of Photoshop. Not all of them do, if you can see this
little panel up here that says 3D… you’re in luck, you can carry on. If it’s not there,
unfortunately you just… can’t make it work on
your particular machine. Two reasons, the main
one is that you need… what’s called a 64-bit
version of Photoshop. You can check it here,
under ‘Help’, ‘System Info’. At the top here you can see,
this is a 64-bit version… but say it’s 32, unfortunately
you just can’t do it… your machine, in its heart is 32… and it can’t be upgraded, so you need
a different computer unfortunately. If you do have a 64-bit,
and you can’t see it… the other thing is something called VRAM. It has a minimum requirement, I think
of about 500 Megabytes of VRAM. So pretty nerdy stuff, but I guess if
you are looking to buy a computer… make sure it has loads of VRAM,
as much as you can get. More than half a Gig, or 500 Megabytes… and just make sure
the operating system is 64-bit. The other thing we’ll do is
we’ll set up our workspace. Go to ‘Window’, ‘Workspace’,
and make sure it’s set to 3D. I’m going to hit ‘Reset 3D’. The other thing you might do
is under your ‘Preferences’… Remember, ‘Edit’, ‘Preferences’ on a PC,
or up here on my Mac. Go to ‘Performance’, 3D is real stressful. So you might yank this up a bit higher… to say, Photoshop can have
a bit more of my RAM. 83%, everything else is
going to run slower… but at least Photoshop
is going to work okay. So we’re going to look at two kinds
of 3D in Photoshop. We’ll look at something called Postcard,
and one called Extrusion. Before we get started I’m going to grab
my ‘Type Tool’, pick a font, pick a size… and type a word, ‘Rad’… for no good reason. Pick a color for it. You might have switched back
to your layers Panel. If you’re freaked out by this 3D,
we’ll get into him in a second. Pick a color, it doesn’t matter
what color you pick. Now picking your color here
is just going to save time later on. You can change it once it’s 3D
but it’s easier to pick your color here. Now if you are doing two words
that are on separate layers… you will have to merge
them into one layer. Let’s just quickly do that in case you– We’re not going to do it for this one
but let’s say we’ve got the Rad… and you want to do 3D for this.
What you’re going to have to do is select both of them, right click them,
and say ‘Convert to Shape’. Then right click them
and say ‘Merge Shapes’. That’s if you’re using more than
one word. I’m going to undo. I don’t want more than one word,
so the text is fine. So let’s look at the two ways
of creating 3D. So the background layer here, we’re going
to do what’s called Postcard 3D. So we’re going to right click it
and say, you are a ‘Postcard’. The 3D world opens up. So the navigation tools for 3D
are along the top here. We’re going to use this first one,
just click, hold. It’s easier to click, hold, and drag the
outside than it is the actual object… until you know what you’re doing. So I’m just clicking and dragging,
you can see I can rotate it around. So that’s what postcard does,
it makes it super thin… which is going to be fine for us because
we’re going to use it as a background. So you might be laying out
your UI Web Design template… something like that. So you might be laying out,
say a Web Design or UI mock-up… that you’ve created in Photoshop. You just want to kind of move it on
an angle to make it look like… it’s a cool angle or maybe
mocked up on to a cell phone. So Postcard will be perfect. What we want to do is add
some full 3D, some extrusion. We’ll do it to this text here. So right click the text, and I’m
going to use this other option… that says ‘New 3D Extrusion
from Selected Layer’. And that’s it, same tool as before… and I’m going to click and
drag in this area over here. So that is how to add 3D. This is your Extrusion Depth,
how thick you want this thing… do you want it to be– not negative? This little slider is a little bit weird,
kind of resets itself every time. So if you wanted to be positive… I’m going to type in 100 pixels
and see what it looks like. So we’re going to undo a few times… because what I want to do is
I want to show you something first. We want to connect these two
because at the moment… they’re actually two different 3D worlds,
so I’m going to keep undoing. So back to the beginning. So in my Layers Panel… this guy’s 3D, this guy here, so he’s flat. This guy’s not 3D yet, so I’m going to
right click him, make him a ‘3D Extrusion’. And to get them living
in the same world… you go back to ‘Layers’,
and just join the two. You hold ‘Shift’, click both of them
and then hit ‘Command E’. Or you can right click here
and go to ‘Merge Layers’. The difference now is
if I drag it around… you can see, they’re actually
a part of the same world. So that’s what we want to do. Now we want to work on these
two things separately… mainly just this extrusion here,
I want to have it not so thick. So go to the ‘3D Panel’, click on ‘Rad’. And the Extrusion, I’ll just type it in. I don’t know if pixels
is going to work for me. So now brings up an interesting
navigation rule. If I click and drag this now
I’m actually just moving the text… separate from the background.
How do I move them both at the same time? So there’s two ways of moving,
you move the scene or the camera… or you move the object. How do you know if you’ve
got one selected on the other? You can see it over here,
see Rad, I have him selected… if I click on my ‘Background Mesh’… that’s background… I’m using these tools along the top… they actually only affect
the object I’ve selected. So what you can do is you can click
on ‘Current View’ or ‘Scene’… and move that around. It was the camera that
we’re looking through. The objects aren’t moving at all,
just moving the camera. So what I’d like to do is move it… so I can see the sides, and I
want to move this fella back. So I clicked on the object,
I want to move it closer. There’s a couple of ways,
this one right here, the Move Tool… I can click and drag it
and just get it closer… till it pokes out the back, or I can
grab this blue handle here… this moves the Z axis. Z is forward and back, towards the camera,
away from the camera. And the green one is up and down, and it’s
really hard to get the Rad one there. So you might have to rotate it around… but remember, if I rotate it here,
I’m rotating the object. So I’m going to click on ‘Current View ‘,
and then move it around. ‘Move Tool’. So we’re going to get our angle now,
so I’m going to get it like this. And before we go on what I want to do is
quickly show you how you do it with a logo. We’ve done it with text,
what I’m going to do is… just turn the Eyeball off
on the Rad layer… and the Background Mesh, and we’re just
bringing a logo before we go any further. Because the rules apply whether you’re… bringing in somebody else’s logo
or using your text… or any sort of shape you’ve drawn
in maybe Illustrator. So I’m going to go ‘File’,
‘Place Embedded’. And in your ’15 3D’ folder, I’ve got
a logo in here, it’s just the Twitter logo. Bring it in. Cool thing about it,
it’s vector. Hit ‘Return’. Actually going to make it a bit smaller. And all we need to do is, we can
go to ‘Layers’, right click ‘Extrusion’… or in this 3D layer,
it doesn’t really matter… I want to make it a 3D Extrusion,
and hit ‘Create’. You get to the exact same place. So whether we used our Rad text,
or you want to do it with a logo… there is no real difference. Here we go, I’m going to undo,
bye Twitter. I’m going to turn these back on. So what I want to do is, I want
a kind of an angle that looks cool. It’s a little hard because you can’t
see all the shadowing here. We’ll add lights and stuff later… but I’m going to get to kind
of an angle that I like. And I’m kind of guessing here,
so what I want to do is do a Render. So rendering is going to
at least get started… under ‘3D’, there’s this option here. It’s all the buttons plus R. What it’s going to do is it’s going
to stress your computer out. It’s going to start trying to render it
like it would be when it’s finished. It’s going to take a long time. So often I don’t wait
for this to finish… I’m just doing this thing,
I’m just like, you keep going… until I get a sense of like,
yes I like that angle, or I don’t. To get it to stop… you hit the ‘Esc’ key. To figure out how much longer it’s got,
see down the bottom left here… time remaining, about five minutes. Never worry about the minutes,
goes up and down. Kind of in crazy steps,
so you can kind of get a sense… we’re 10% through,
so it’s going to be a while. And all that’s going to happen is
it’s going to get more and more realistic. So I’m just going to hit ‘Esc’… just kind of freezes it there,
half way through its render. So you might say, I like it, but what I
want to do is maybe, at the Current View… I’m going to use the Move option. I’m just going to click, hold, and–
actually no, the Slide option… really hard to use one,
I’m going to slide this camera back… and then I’m going to zoom it in
using this last option. Because I want a really cool kind
of like Depth of Field… or I want the perspective
to be quite strong. Kind of in the center there,
maybe zoom out a little bit. Remember, Render… on my Mac its ‘Command-Option-Shift-R’,
on a PC it’s ‘Ctrl-Alt-Shift-R’. I’m happy with that angle
and that composition; actually I’m not. ‘Esc’, and it’s going to
kind of come back a bit. So a couple of things I want to do,
is I need this background to be larger. So I’ve got to kind of extend
it out this way. And because I’m pedantic,
I kind of want it like that. So my Background Layer, there it is there. So what I need to do is make
the background just larger. So click on this last option here. This only appears if I have
an object selected. Either the Rad text
or the Mesh Background. And all I need to do again, click out here,
I’m just going to make it bigger. Feels like it’s big enough,
I do need to slide it though. I’m going to grab my ‘Move Tool’… I’m actually going to use this Rad guy,
because I can kind of see him there. Almost there, needs to probably
come down green. So you’re playing with the XYZ,
there it is there, a little bit more scale. If you find 3D really tough to work with,
and you’re like… “Man, this is quite hard”… don’t worry, it took me ages
to get used to 3D. Even now, can be a little bit tough… when you’re using a different program
like Photoshop. Some other stuff when I’m doing 3D,
I’ll use something called Cinema 4D. It’s kind of more for
animated motion graphics. Photoshop does it fine, but my
poor little computer here is… it’s a really good computer but it
is stressed, trying to render this stuff… whereas something like Cinema 4D
is purpose built… for doing 3D, especially movement. Photoshop does it fine though,
especially for static graphics. Anyway that’s enough for rendering; ‘Esc’. Didn’t actually tap ‘Esc’, now I have. I’m going to just play
around with my adjustments. I want to click on the Current View. I’m just going to rotate this around… until I find something I’m a
little bit more happy with. And while I wiggle this around
and find something that I like… I will see you in the next video. You don’t have to watch me. And in the next video we are going to
look at materials and textures… because at the moment, what
I basically use is just jpg in the back… and our little Type here, just a kind of
a really plain solid color. Let’s look at doing different materials
and textures in the next video. Hi there, this video is all
about materials and textures. We’ll make some kind of
light blue acrylic… just some shiny green stuff, some glass. All right, let’s figure out
how to make it. So continuing on from our last tutorial… we’re going to look at the materials
or textures of our 3D Extrusion. Specifically this Type here. So what we need to do is
have the background layer selected… it’s actually not going to be
called background anymore… I’m going to call it ‘3D Type’. ‘3D Type’. And we’re going to go to our 3D Panel,
so the materials are these things here. You can see, inflation material,
bevel material, we’ve got the front of it. The edges of it, the extrusion,
which is the sides of it. They’re back bevel and the backside,
which we can’t see. What we want to do is
actually do it for all of them. So what we can do is just
click on this one and select this. So we’ve got all of the
different material selected. And what you’ll see at the top here
is your Properties Panel changes. So the starting off material… is if I drop this down, your basic one
is this guy here, hover above him. He’s No Texture, that’s what we’ve got. This No Texture has a diffusion color
of the green that we got from our type. This is how you change your color. Say you want it to be pink now,
pinky color. And we’re going to hit ‘Render’. You can see, it’s using that color now. ‘Esc’. So you can start
with this basic color… and play around with things like
the shine, reflection… roughness, bump, opacity, refraction. Experiment them, we’re not going
to go through all of them. Reflection’s probably like
a big shiny material. If you go 100% it’s a complete mirror. It’s not going to be that useful, so I’m
going to reflect a bit of shininess. I’m going to hit ‘Render’. And I’m going to spend
a little bit of time… waiting for this to render
so you can see what it is. Even I got bored of it,
so we sped it up to here. What I’m going to show you is,
while you’re working… it’s best to probably turn your Render
Settings down to a really low quality… just so that you get a quick look of it
without it going too far. But before we do that, you can see
the shine and reflection appearing here… you can see the reflection of the
background graphic, the wood cast in there. It’s pretty amazing… you can see the reflection of
each of the letters on itself. It’s all very amazing,
it’s time to get nicer and nicer… but you can see it’s got a
lot more rendering to do… before this thing is perfect. So things you can do to speed up
your render time. First thing is, under your ‘Image’–
oops, I’m going to have to ‘Esc’. Under your ‘Image’, ‘Image Size’… you can work at it really small. We’re working at 1500 pixels across,
which is reasonably small, right? I did it for this exercise so that
when you’re playing along… it’s not going too slow. The cool thing about it though
is that Rad here is vector. So we can scale this right down
to something really small… and work on it there. Just, you know, a really small version. And when we’re finished,
before we do our final render… just yank up the pixels
to something larger. The only thing that’s going to limit it
is our background graphic. I made it 1500 pixels across,
you might have to just work with… a Smart Object, that’s a lot larger,
so that you can scale it up. The other thing you can do to speed
things up is under ‘Preferences’… and we’re going to go to ‘Performance’. You can yank this up even higher. You can switch it to this
Huge Pixel Dimension option. And under 3D, make sure that your VRAM,
it’s different from the regular RAM. This is your Video RAM,
I’ve got mine at 100%, take over, please. Shadow Quality, low, High Quality,
Threshold, low. Let’s click ‘OK’, and now I’m
going to do another render… well, I won’t do another render,
but it will go faster. So let’s look at a little bit
more materials. This 3D environment can
get a little bit tricky. So what you can do,
like on the Layers Panel… remember, earlier on we went, only show
me stuff that has a Type Layer. You can do the same in the 3D Layer. I click on my– Make sure, in your Layers Panel,
you’ve actually got the layer selected. 3D here, you can say,
actually just show me the meshes. Which is the actual physical objects,
here’s my type, and there’s my background. Or I can turn that off and actually
just turn on the materials. So that’s the material,
that is my background. And these are the materials
that are being used on this object. The front, back, left side,
and any corners. Once we get into light you can
turn those on as well… we set the One Overall Light at the moment. So under ‘Materials’ I’m going
to select all of these. I want all of the materials for Rad. And you can play with these but… under this little drop down here
there’s a bunch of default ones as well. You just hover above them, they’ll give
you a kind of an explanation what they are. Cotton fabric, Denim. So you can play around with these
and apply it. Let’s look at maybe
something like, kind of glass. Crystal glass, frosted glass,
glass scratches. Pick one, Dan. Glass Smooth, I’m picking
Glass Smooth and– problem with the glass is, while I’m
working on it, it’s completely see-through. And when I hit render… it’s quite the stress on the
machine trying to render glass. So ‘Render 3D’, hit all the buttons. It’s got started. But even on the lower qualities
it’s still not right. The one thing with the quality though… make sure you turn it back up
when you do your final export… or you’re ready for your final print. Before we move on, especially
working with glass… it’s just the rendering’s taking too long. So what we can do is, you can
grab the ‘Rectangle Marquee Tool’… and what we might do actually is
turn up my rendering, so back to ‘3D’… and I’m going to say,
actually let’s go for high quality. It’s going to crank back up… because what I’m going to do is
I’m going to use my Rectangle Marquee Tool. Select a chunk. I’m not able
to see the whole thing… well I can, but I just want
to see just this chunk. Maybe that bit there. And if I click on this Render button
down the bottom… it will render just where I
have a Rectangle Marquee Tool. So I can zoom in a bit. No, we’ll wait for it to finish. I said I’ll try to render
out the whole thing… I can just take a little snippet
and get an idea of the material… before I go and maybe commit to
the whole thing being rendered. So make a selection,
Rectangle Marquee Tool… and then just give that button a click. You can see, I cranked
it up pretty high… and you can see it’s going even
slower than it was before… but I’m getting a good sense
of the object here. That’s enough for me, ‘Esc’. I’m going to ‘Select’, ‘Deselect’, and I’m
going to turn my Preferences back to… something more manageable.
Shadow Quality, back to low. A couple of things before we
move on, about materials. One is, you can see,
it’s kind of rendering… this dark black line through it. You might not be able to see it
because you can’t see this floor plane. To get rid of that kind
of weird dark line… go to your– back to this
option here in the 3D Layer. It’s showing me everything in my 3D scene.
Click on the word ‘Scene’.————————— I like to click on the word Environment. There’s the ground plane. Photoshop puts it in there by default,
because it’s cool. If you don’t have this wooden background… at least the shadows get cast on
the floor, which is pretty cool… but in our case I want to turn
the opacity down to 0. The other thing is,
because it’s glass it’s hard to see… what you can do is you can go to
‘Scene’, and show me the ‘Lines’. They do render, so you can use
it kind of to re-angle things… but then turn them off
before you render it out. Let’s grab our material for this guy. For Rad, and don’t use glass. Stresses the machine out. What you can do though is start messing
around with some of these other colors. They’re not just colors, some of them
have what’s called a Bump Map. Which means they’re actually going to
give it a kind of a lumpy look. It’s out of the scope of this video. If you want to go back to
just a standard flat color… kind of about halfway down
there’s one called No Texture. Then click on the ‘Diffusion Color’… and pick a color, I’m going to go
back to our little minty green. So there are some built in materials
you can use. Once you’ve loaded them
you can adjust them. Also know that there are actually
some more that Adobe will give you. They give it to you free,
if you go to ‘3D’… and go to this option that says
‘Get more content’. It will load up the Adobe website. It will come to here,
and down here you can– there’s materials that you can download. There’s also some meshes. When they say mesh, they mean a 3D model. And down here there’s different stages… kind of lighting setups for products,
all sorts of awesome stuff. Once you have downloaded the materials
and unzipped them… you can go into here and just go
to the cog, and say ‘Load Materials’. So that’s going to be it for materials. Let’s get into the next video
where we look at using cameras. Hi there, this video is all about
looking at 3D cameras. We’re going to look at creating
a cool Depth of Field. You can see in this render here on
the left, it’s kind of in sharp focus… then as it heads off into the
background it fades out. Kind of mimicking a really shallow
Depth of Field in a normal camera. We’ll show you how to
save templated views… where everything’s kind of
angled exactly how you want… and then you can move
to different views… to take a look at it
from different angles… but always come back to
that view you really liked. Let’s jump in now and work out
how to do it. So what is a camera?
The camera is what we’re looking through. So we’re looking through right now
through a camera… to see this ‘Rad’ text. Now often what we need to do is
kind of get the angle that we love… but also this is the way
I wanted to render this angle. Let’s say I want to move
this closer to the background. So I need a different angle, I need to see
how close it is, then kind of drag it in… but then I need to go back, and… “My God, it’s not quite the same
as it was before.” So I’m going to undo. So what you do is you set your camera. Up the top here, if you’ve got
Current View selected… go up to here, where it says ‘View’,
and say I want to ‘Save’ this view, please. This is going to be the ‘Rad View’. The nice thing about this is,
Rad view saved there… and it means that I can work here
and I can get my… say I want this to be– I click on it… I’m going to move it a bit further out. There’s a bit more gap between it. So I’m going to click out here,
so I’ve got the Current View selected. I’m happy with that. Let’s say I want to get it back
to where it was… or kind of positioned and composed nicely. Let’s click on ‘Rad View’. Photoshop’s clever and
moves the camera back. You can have as many views as you like. You can also see these default ones,
I can look at it from the top, please. So to try to rearrange everything, you can
see I’m looking straight down on top. There’s my text, and there is
my very thin background. Default is the way it opened up,
straight on. And I’m going to go back to Rad view. So that’s setting up the camera,
let’s look at Depth of Field. So with ‘Rad View’ selected up here… you’ve got this here,
the Depth of Field plane. Now let’s add a depth. With it at 0,
there is no, like super focus… and the higher it is the more shallow
the Depth of Field is, let’s get at it ‘2’. What you’ll see is, there is a bit
of blurriness and a bit of not blurry. Yours will be different because
yours is kind of angled differently… but there’s like a central bit of focus. That’s where this distance
comes in and out. So you can kind of move, can you see,
if I’m dragging it left and right… it’s kind of going past and
through to the back… and this only works if you’re at an angle,
let’s go in at a really steep angle. So you can see, kind of about
two-thirds down the wood. It’s in sharp focus,
everything else is not. The depth, remember, is how,
like sharp that focus is… or how narrow it is, so I’m going to
have mine at something like 2. And then the distance,
if I go way out you can see… the far distance of our wood isn’t focused
and this is here. So what I’m going to do,
go back to my ‘Rad View’… and I’m just going to play around
with the depth. I like that but I want the… kind of sharp focus to be at the front
of this R, but this can blur out. Now the only trouble with this is that,
you can see it’s no longer Rad view. Rad view actually is tied
into this Depth of Field… so what we’re going to do… is we’re going to save another one. This is going to be ‘Rad Depth of Field’. The Rad Depth of Field view. You can leave the other one there,
or you can click on it and go… you my friend are– delete. I go back to Rad view. Awesome!
I’m going to hit ‘Render’. It’s cool but not as extreme
as I want it to be. I’m going to hit ‘Esc’, grab the ‘Depth’,
and you’re going to go higher. So all this stuff’s getting pretty blurry. Distance. Render again. It’s okay. I’m going to mess about with it
while in between videos… I’m going to do lots of this because
I really love that Depth of Field… and I’m really going to try
and fake it here. I’m going to experiment
while you’re in between videos. So I’m kind of back before you go… because of the joys of
speeding up the render. I’m happy with that. You can see sharp focus on the left,
fading out in the background. Let’s get into the next video… where we look at lighting
and casting shadows, and things. Hey, it’s me again, I just
want to quickly jump in. If you’re watching, but not
following along… you can download the exercise files
I’m using in this course, free of charge. They are down in the link
in the description. Also note that, quickly check
this stuff out. This is some of the content we create… in the Photoshop Essentials
and Photoshop Advanced course. It’s a mixture of creating
beautiful Photoshop work… as well as the professional work
for other tricks and techniques. It’s my paid course, there is a link
in the description for that paid course. If you like my teaching style, and you
like what you see here, check it out. But for now let’s continue
with the free stuff here. You don’t want to hear me
talking anymore, let’s get going. Hi there, this video we’re going
to look at lights in 3D. There are four kinds of lights. We’ll work out how they affect our objects
and how they cast shadows. We’ll show you how to move them around… to get kind of more dramatic effects. That’s already dramatic,
but you get what I mean. Let’s jump in now and work out
how they work in Photoshop. Working with lights, now by default
you’re given a light. It’s here under ‘Environment’,
it’s just a default light. Just to give things shadows
so they can be seen. So you’ve got one light to start with. What we’re going to do is look at adding
our own kind of like purposeful lights. You do it by, on your 3D layer here,
down here, this little light bulb… let’s look at Infinite Light. Think of the Infinite Light as the Sun. You can’t really move it physically,
you can change the angle… by grabbing this little ball thing
at the end here. You can kind of decide
where it’s going to be cast. You can see the shadows affecting it
in the background there. So I’m going to go straight up
and try and cut. You can see the shadow being
cast on the background. A little hard to see. I’m going to hit ‘Render’ to give you
a quick view. You can see here, it’s kind of,
light from the top… it’s kind of casting shadows on
itself here and on to the background. So Infinite Light is a perfect one,
think of it as like sunlight. It’s just kind of a good fill light,
and that may be all you need. What you might find though is –
I’m going to hit ‘Esc’, stop rendering. – is that you’ve now got two lights. You’ve got the environmental light… which is kind of like an ambient light,
plus you’ve got the Sun. So they’re both working together. Let’s say you don’t want
the environmental light… because you just want this
really strong sunlight. So here in ‘Environment’, just turn
this one here, turn IBL ‘off’. Now we’ve only got this Infinite Sun. It makes, I guess a little not clearer,
but it’s just one directional sunlight. Now when I render… it really looks like we’ve
just got a single bulb. It’s not super strong… but in the shadows it’s super dark… whereas an ambient light bounces around
and kind of fills lots of holes. Things you can do to adjust
the infinite light… so with it selected down here… you can decide on how
soft the shadows are… or whether it has shadows at all,
you might not want them at all. So we’ve got shadows,
softness is really low… but watch this, if I crank it up it will
get more feathered and more feathered… rather than being a really kind of
harsh strong thick shadow. Click ‘Render’ as well to show it. You can see now, it is
kind of a fluffy shadow. ‘Esc’, you can also play around
with the intensity. How bright this thing is,
and how, maybe not bright it is. Easy one. Color just means
it’s going to tint the color. Say you want a kind of a weird yellow tint
not a weird yellow tint… but you know what I mean. You just want kind of
daylight flavor to it… or you can go something a bit
more indoorsy. More like fluorescent lighting,
kind of some sort of blue. Let’s look at some of
the other lighting types. You got two other ones,
Spot and Point do a very similar thing. Infinite Light’s like the Sun. Point Light, let’s turn that one ‘on’. I’m going to turn ‘off’ the Infinite Sun. Think of a Point Light as
carrying around a bulb… physically carrying it around,
and moving around the room… whereas Infinite Light just comes
from everywhere in one direction. The bulb is actually something
you can find. So with it selected
we can actually move it around. Now for me, I can see it, it’s down here.
You might have to zoom out. You should be able to see it,
and what we can do now is– it’s a little hard to move
this thing around. What you might do is
look at it from the top. Maybe we can go up to our ‘Views’… ‘Current View’, and go to ‘Top’. This might be the easier way to look at it. So I’ve got my Point Light selected
and I want to move it. Use ‘Move’, click the red one. Get this closer, you can see I’m actually
right in front of the text now. So now if we go back to ‘Current View’… and actually go down,
actually there’s an easier way… you can click on ‘Rad Option 2’ there. Can you see, I’ve moved this bulb… really close to the artwork. So it’s kind of like
carrying a little lamp around. And it’s going out all directions. Pretty cool, kind of moody, spooky. Z moves it away, and close. And you’ve got your X and Y
to kind of move it up and down. I’m going to zoom a little bit. To zoom out go to your Top View
and see if you can make it happen. So that’s a Point Light. A Spotlight’s kind of similar,
except it’s directional. Does the same sort of thing. It’s like you physically carrying
a spotlight around. I’ll hit ‘Esc’. That’s pretty cool.
I’m going to turn that one off. We have no lights. I’m going to add the last one,
which is a Spotlight. This is even harder to use
if you’ve never used 3D. I’m going to zoom out. I click on ‘Current View’.. I’m going to click on this first option… and I’m going to see if I can find–
there he is there. If I click on my ‘Spotlight’… you can see, it’s casting this way,
it’s only just getting a bit of this. And it can be fun to you. Let’s again get it into a kind of a spot
where we know what’s happening with it. So we’re going to go to ‘Current View’,
let’s go to ‘Top’ to see where it is. Zoom out. There’s my little light there. I’m going to grab my ‘Move’ option. I’m going to click on my ‘Spotlight’. It’s shining kind of through
and past my object, which is cool. What I want to do is
I want to try and move it… move it this way. I need to rotate it around
so I’m going to use the ‘Rotation’ option. I’m going to move it so it’s facing there. Closer. Bit further away. So that’s looking at it from
the top, where you know… it’s kind of at least from the top down,
we can see it pointing at my object. Go back to ‘Current View’
and let’s use the– let’s look at it from the right hand side. So it’s kind of coming down
and towards it, and that’s fine. Spotlight. I might bring it down this way. Closer in, and say I want to rotate it. Make sure you’ve got the rotation,
and click and drag it. It’s a little bit hard, left and right,
not up and down. So I’ve got a spotlight pointing at
my text and my background. Let’s have a little look.
Let’s go back to my… ‘Rad Option 2’. Click on my ‘Spotlight’. You can see mine here, it’s actually
pointing kind of just up in to the left. So I could play a fun game
of trying to rotate it… and clicking, dragging,
and rotating it around. I’m going to use the ‘Rotate 3D Object’… and try and drag it around
to point it at my graphic. And it’s kind of working. So it’s very directional. And we have to do a lot of switching
between different views… to try and work it out. The other thing you can do is you’ve got
the Hotspot and the Cone of Light. So basically how focused this is.
Oops, wrong option. It’s these two little dots here,
so I can expand this out. So what’s happening is, inside the circle
is full brightness from this light. You can adjust the intensity
of that center chunk… then you’ve got the fall-off… which is anywhere between this hotspot
and the outside of the cone. So there’s no light outside of this,
watch this, if I took you in very narrow… and then this in very narrow,
you can see… the light is only affecting
within that little range there… so I’m going to expand it out. Again this will depend
on what you want to do. If you want a really narrow
kind of searchlight… you can adjust the hotspot
end cone over here. It’s a little hard to
work now on the graphic. Hit ‘Render’. You can see there, had a kind of
a weird square going on. Was just temporarily while it was… just working. In my case I want the cone
to be a lot bigger. I want the shadows to have
a bit more softness. I’m going to play around
with the rotation of it… so ‘Spotlight’ selected,
the ‘Orbit’ option… and just going to kind of wiggle it around
until I get it how I want. Hit ‘Render’. So that is a half render, but that is
the difference between a spotlight. You point it around and it’s super fun,
and not difficult, yes, it’s difficult. It’s hard to get in pointing
in the right direction. Point Light is quite easy. Just got to make sure you zoom out
and actually find it on the map. You might have to play around
with the different views. Just to figure out where it is in
the world, and I can see mine there. It’s my little Point Light, move it
to where I want it to be. Up, down, left, right. I can adjust how bright it is,
how fluffy the shadows are… or whether it had shadows at all. Or you can use the Infinite Light… which is more like, you just play around
with the directions hitting things. All cast from the same angle. I’ll go to my ‘Rad Option 2’, zoom in. Just a nice simple light. Or you might turn that off and use
just the Environment Light. Or it’s just kind of a generic fill… things refract and bounce around,
and fill things. There’s a bit of contrast,
and there’s shadow’s cast… but it’s a bit more like real life. Or you can turn them all on. Have them all battling for supremacy. And all kind of over
saturating each other. If we render that, wow, that’s bright. All lights working together as one. So that’s going to be it for lights. Let’s get into the last video where we
look at rendering for our final production. So we’ve got everything we like,
we’ve got the shadows how we want… the materials, the angle,
the Depth of Field. How do we export this? We already exported it,
what you do is you render it… and then don’t change anything. I’ll show you what I mean. First thing I want to do is I want
to crank up my Preferences. We turned them down in a previous video. So under ‘Photoshop’ ‘Preferences’,
Performance, no, ‘3D’… it’s under ‘Edit’, ‘Preferences’, ‘3D’
on a PC. Now what you’ll find is, cranking this
up to like maximum of everything… is actually just going to take
a zillion years to render. If you’re okay with that
let’s see how long this is going to take. Let’s hit our ‘Render’.
Now rendering is all the buttons plus R. It’s this shortcut here,
or you can just click on this… or you can click on this option here. Zoom render, yours is just at render,
come halfway through mine. Under 3D though, there’s an option
that says render… lots and lots of rendering. Let’s just see how long
it’s going to be at full noise… of an image that’s only
1500 pixels across. You can see down here, Time remaining… it’s going to be about 14 hours. 13 hours, is a bit jumpy
at the beginning here… but you are going to get
the most perfect render… that you’re probably not going to need. So you’ve got to decide what
the balance is. A really good balance is
under ‘Preferences’… it’s probably something like… 3D. So Shadow Quality is going to be ‘High’. And the Quality Threshold
is going to be about… the 4, 5, 6 is fine; looks good. If you find there’s some noise
that you don’t like… you might come back in
here and increase it up… but up around 10 is
just way too hard core. Even for like finished final work,
5 is going to look just good. So I’m going to render now. You have the benefit of
me speeding this up… so we’ll just see how long
this one’s going to take. I’ll see you when it’s done,
I’m going to go get a coffee. All right, I’m back. Didn’t make a coffee,
I made pot noodles. It’s grim, nothing here in the office,
but we’ve done our render. Now I want this to not look… like, want to get rid of
this 3D stuff that’s rendered. The trick is, don’t move anything. What you want to do is go back to your
Layers Panel and click off that layer. And that’s it, you just got a
file that’s ready to be used. You can import this into
InDesign or Illustrator… but it feels a bit weird because
you’ve still got access to this 3D stuff. I know I do, so sometimes I just
want a JPEG, I’m going to go to ‘File’… I’m going to go to ‘Save As’. I’m going to save mine on my desktop.
I’m going to call this one ‘Rad’. Actually you’re going to be a JPEG. Click ‘Save’. Click ‘OK’. Hopefully, on my desktop I’ve got Rad. There he is, and that is
a high quality version of Rad. Let’s say you plan on going in
and back, and looking the 3D type. What you might do is click
on this layer here… do a ‘Select All’, copy and just paste it. Then you’ve got a version of this that’s– I moved over a little bit. But then you’ve got a version of this… that’s actually just flat,
there’s no 3D about it. You turn it off, so you can
come back in here… and go and mess with 3D again. ‘3D Panel’, ‘Current View’. That’s about with it. Potentially, now you can go
and re-render it. If you weren’t happy with the
render you got before… you can go in back into here and
just increase the Quality Threshold. I felt like mine was fine, but let’s
say you’re having problems… with maybe artifacts, with say,
you went with a glass option… and you just went happy with
the realism of the glass… you can crank up the Quality Threshold… and hit ‘Render’ again, maybe you do it
before you go to bed… or just before you go to lunch,
and you’re happy with a 1-hour render. But because we did a copy and paste
back in here in the layers… we can always go back to that one… and maybe compare it
against our new render. All under one file. All right, so that’s going to be
the end of our 3D experience. Now there is a lot more to 3D
than what I’ve shown you here. Just covered the basics,
we covered making things 3D… either by converting it into a postcard,
or like here, where we extruded the text. We looked at changing the materials. Then we looked at using the cameras
to our advantage. So setting and saving
these different views… and playing with the Depth of Field. We looked at lighting, and the shadows,
and we looked at exporting just now. So that’s going to be it for
our introduction to 3D in Photoshop. I hope you found it useful. Let’s get on to the next part
of the tutorial series. It’s class project time,
going to make some 3D stuff. I’m happy for you to use your own images… or you can use the one I’ve supplied. So in your 15 3D folder, there’s
a class project folder. There’s a background graphic you can use. There will be the one you
turn into a postcard… and smoosh with this one here
that you can extrude as 3D text. So this one here, just import… ‘File’, ‘Import’, like we
did the Twitter logo… in the set of videos before,
and extrude it. Or you can create your own graphic,
or use your own text. It’s totally up to you. Then I want you to experiment with… colors, materials, angles,
Depth of Field, the lighting… and when you finish, render it all out
and share it with me. Depending on your computer,
I’ve given you a document size. It’s kind of standard video size,
1920 pixels across x 1080 pixels high. You can make that smaller if you’re
finding it a little bit hard to render it. Just kind of work with it
in any sort of sense. When you’re finished
I’d love to see what you do. You might try a few different ones,
send me all of them. Maybe make a little montage… of three or four different angles,
different colors, different materials. I’d love to see what you make,
and it’d be really good practice. 3D is a tough one. Hope you enjoy the new experience. All right, on to the next video. Hi there, are you ready to fake 3D? In the last video we learnt
how to do it properly… in this video we’re going to
use a cheap trick. You don’t need a 3D compatible version
of Photoshop… just need a paintbrush, a gradient… and it worked all right. We’ll even fake in some shadows, can you
see in the background there? Fake shadows. Let’s learn how to do a fake version
in Photoshop. To get started let’s open up
‘Fake 3D’ from our ’15 3D’ folder. This background is just
a pretty background… it’s not going to have any influence
on the 3Dness of what we’re doing. Next thing we need to do is,
down the bottom here… grab the ‘Rectangle Tool’, hold it down
until we get the Ellipse Tool. This Ellipse needs to have the
gradient we want to use… so it’s probably going
to have a normal fill. So click on ‘Fill’ at the top here
and click on ‘Gradient’. We’re not too worried about
the colors at the moment… click this first one,
this ‘Black vs White’. We’re going to go and
change it in a second. And draw out a circle. I’m holding down the ‘Shift’ key so that
when I drag this out it’s a perfect circle. How big should it be?
Basically it’s how big you want… the largest part of your
kind of 3D text. You saw mine didn’t get too big,
so that’s fine. It can be smaller, can be bigger. Let’s change the gradient. With the Ellipse selected,
in my ‘Properties Panel’ here… I click on the color… and I’m going to double
click these bottom houses. You could pick one of the default ones. That would work,
I’m going to jump out to Grabient… because I love stealing colors
from these guys. I’m going to use the Page 2 option,
where are you? Page 3 even, this one here. So I’m going to add three little points. Let’s click a little color,
grab the Hexadecimal number… click on this, double click
this first icon… paste it in down the bottom here… jump back out. Thank you, Grabient. I’m going to add this middle one… by just clicking anywhere in
this kind of bottom part. Just appears magically. Actually I kind of like that
with the orange. Now I’m going to stick to the original. I lie, I’m just going to leave the orange;
crazy Dan. They can be your gradients itself. Now what I’m going to do is
I’m going to duplicate this layer… I’m going to click it and hit Command J’. I’m going to turn this off. I want this kind of editable shape
for later on… because this tool is not going to work
if this is a lovely live shape. What we have to do is right click
‘Ellipse 1’ and go to ‘Rasterize Layer’. Destroying all the good
updatableness to it… but it means this technique
is actually going to work. So what we need to do is
we need something called the Mixer Brush. It’s hiding underneath your Brush Tool,
hold it down, grab the ‘Mixer Brush’. First thing you need to do is
this little drop down here… you need to turn this off. It’s going to be on by default,
let’s turn off ‘Load Solid Colors Only’… because we want to steal a gradient. Along here we want to set the Wetness
down to ‘0’, Load up to ‘100%’. Let’s get the hardness of this brush. So I’m just going to click
on the general brushes… and use this hard rounded one. The first thing we need to do
is we need the brush size… to be bigger than our Ellipse here. So make your brush just bigger
than what you need it to be… because what we’re going
to do is hold down… the ‘Option’ key on a Mac or the ‘Alt’ key
on a PC to set this as a target. We’re going to say, you. Yours is probably not going to work… because it’s going to
say Sample All Layers. So it’s going to grab my background
as well as this. Look up here, so with it on it grabs
too much background plus my Ellipse. I want to say, actually just sample
the layer that I’m on, which is this. So this is where it’s going to steal from. I’m going to lower my Brush Size to kind
of what I want to use to draw with. We’re going to create our own layer. This one’s going to be my ‘3D Type Layer’. Actually you’re not allowed to call it 3D,
it’s 2.5D, fake 3D. So let’s get started, I’m going to draw– terrible time with my mouse. So we’re kind of there, it’s doing
kind of what we want. Let’s undo that, we’ll leave it there,
and turn it off. Let’s make another layer. What you can do here to make
it look a little nicer than– actually they came out all right,
got to move fast. But let’s say you want to smooth it out,
you can go to this cog icon. Actually if you can’t
see this thing here… it’s Smoothing, you might have to turn
it on in your Brush Settings. So go to ‘Window’,
and down to ‘Brush Settings’. Just turn Smoothing ‘on’
if it’s not already. It just means that I could just say–
doesn’t have to be 100%… but if I crank it up to about 70, when
I draw that same word, it’s a bit slower… but it’s averaging out my movements. And things are looking
a whole lot nicer. Nicer, nicer. I’m going to draw it again. Spend my time. Why am I using the word Queen? I like the word Q in 3D, and, I don’t know,
that’s definitely Queen. That was meant to be an E. I’m going to redo my E. Oh, man! So bad. I’m going to get my Wacom tablet
in a second… then I’m going to show you how
awesome it is with the tablet. That will do. So smoothing helped but really this effect
works great with one or two things. We’re going to use a Wacom tablet now. And in the next video
we will look at using paths. What is a Wacom tablet?
It is that pen you draw with. Next is a mouse, but you get to
hold it like a pen. I’ll plug mine in now. I guess I’m reluctant to do this
whole course with a Wacom tablet. Even though retouching is really handy
with one of these, not everyone has one. Let’s look at the perk of
using it with this particular tool. So created a new layer, this is going
to be my Wacom version. I use the Wacom Intuos Pro,
the medium sized one. I like it, good size, looks really well. So now I’m using the pen,
I’m going to pick a brush size probably… that is a chunk bigger. Other thing I’m going to do is
I’m going to turn Smoothing down to ‘0’… mainly because I’m reasonably
good doing it with just the pen. You can see it’s pretty smooth… you can turn on Smoothing
maybe just a little bit… but now, drawing with the pen,
I’ll try and do a nice one. Q, no, Q. You can see, what’s really
nice about it is that… the size of the brush changes
depending on how hard you push. So now I’m probably going
to do a zillion attempts… at trying to make the word Queen again. There’s the last one,
I’m running out of room. I’m going to grab my layer,
just going to move it across. So close. I can’t finish it, but that will do. It’s close enough, but you
can see how nice it is… when you are using just a tablet just
to do little dots and little things… and ruining it. What we will do to add a little bit
more realism to this before we go… I’m going to switch back to my mouse. What I’m going to do is, with this layer
selected I’m going to add a Drop Shadow.. That all looks good. Click ‘OK’. What I want to do is right click
‘Drop Shadow’, and ‘Create Layer’. Thank you very much, and it just means
this Drop Shadow is now on its own layer. What I’m going to do is maybe get it to… not sure how much, I’m going to break it
into half at least, I’m going to grab you. Copy, actually cut it,
so ‘Edit’, ‘Cut’, ‘Edit’, ‘Paste’. I’ve got kind of two halves. Why? Because I want to use
this fold in the floor. Let’s work on the top half first. I’ll turn the bottom half off, and that’s
kind of what I want to do, right? I want to look like the light’s
coming from up here… and kind of sticking it
against the back wall. And with this layer, the bottom chunk,
I want it to line up. Using my arrow keys
just to make sure it lines up. Then I’m going to go to
‘Edit’, ‘Transform’… and I’m going to use the
‘Perspective’ option. I’m just going to kind of try
and do something like that… so it looks like it’s kind
of going across the floor. Drag it out a little bit. Hit ‘Return’, it’s kind of working okay. Might as well play with a little bit more. I’m happy enough with it, what we’re going
to do is play around the Blending Modes. Both of these, what I might do is find
a Blending Mode that works for this one. So ‘Multiply’, and let’s look at
something else, but more believable. That’s got a nice soft light. Maybe just lower the opacity
of soft light as well. I’ll do the same for this one,
you my friend are Soft Light. Then I lower the opacity. Even a little bit lower. It’s super subtle, it’s helping
a little bit. So you make a circle, add a gradient,
make sure it’s rasterized. Use the mixer brush, sample that Ellipse,
then paint it on its own layer. If you tie it in with a tablet,
like a Wacom tablet… you can do some nicer stuff where
it’s not just one kind of thickness. Let’s get into the next video. We’re going to do a very similar thing
but we’re going to use paths instead. Things like the Pen Tool.
I’ll see you in a sec. In this video we’re going to do something
similar to what we did in the last one… except we’re going to use
paths in this case. Gives us a bit more control… especially if you understand
how the Pen Tool works… plus, we’ll work out how to
interlock these things as well. Why 38? Because that’s how
many birthdays I’ve had. And they interlock really good. All right, let’s get started. To get started I’m just
using this same background. Actually using the same file as before,
we just turned everything off. You got to make a new layer.
This one’s going to be my ‘3D using Paths’. 2.5D. So for this to work we need a path. Paths are created using any of these tools. If you are a master at the Pen Tool,
use the Pen Tool. If you have done my Illustrator course… and you’re loving the
Curvature Tool, use that one. If you have no idea what any of
these do grab the Freehand Pen Tool. And this is allowing just
to draw paths or lines… but freehand, so undone. Just make sure up the top here
it’s set to ‘Path’ and not Shape. And if you want it,
you can see, it says Curve Fit… I think by default it’s at 4,
I can’t remember what the default is. It goes up to a maximum of 10,
it’s just going to smooth out your drawing. If it’s at 0 or 1 it’s not going
to be very smooth. And I’m drawing, you saw at
the beginning there, 38, that’s my age. And it just so happens that
they kind of interlock nicely. We really want to grab the Pen Tool. I can’t do it, you can use
the Freehand Pen Tool. I’m using the Curvature Tool. This is the super quick introduction,
click once, click once again. It just gives you a line,
but you click a third time… and it’s a curve. Click out here again, it’s a wiggle. Maybe one more time, a couple more times. And if I want to turn that
into a corner, I hold down… the ‘Option’ key and give it a click,
and it goes from a curve to a corner. It’s a weird curve.
So, I’ve got my path… Freehand Tool, the Pen Tool,
or the Curvature Tool. And I’m going to go to Paths. And that’s what I need. Now by default a path kind of disappears
when you stop working with it… unless you give it a name,
so double click the word ‘Work Path’… and this is my ‘3’,
so I can come back to him later on. Now in the Path Panel, if you
can’t see Paths, it’s under ‘Window’… and there he is there. What you can do is right click any
of this gray area, and say… “I’d like you to make a Stroke
on this path, please.” From the ‘Options’
I want to use the ‘Mixer Brush Tool’. And if you haven’t already, you need
to go back to the previous tutorial… to create the Ellipse, set the target… to get that Mixer Brush Tool all set up;
we’re not going to cover that again. And just turn ‘on’ Simulate Pressure’. Now what it’s going to do is– So this is a way of getting around… if you don’t have a Wacom tablet,
and you want it to be nice and smooth. If yours doesn’t look anything like this… there are a couple of things
that might be wrong, I’m going to undo. The easiest thing to check is,
copy my Mixer Brush. I’m going to go to my Mixer Brush there. I’m going to open up my
Mixer ‘Brush Settings’. Under ‘Shape Dynamics’, just make sure
‘Pen Pressure’ is used. Smoothing doesn’t have to be on,
but definitely Pen Pressure. And along the top here you can
copy the settings that I’ve got. If you’re finding, where it gets
kind of around the bend… it gets all kind of jagged, a couple of
things you might do to fix that… is go to ‘Brush Tip Shape’… and change the spacing down to like 1-2%. The higher it is the more
kind of jagged they are. That might fix it. If it doesn’t it probably
means your original source… that thing we made in the last video… this guy here, isn’t big enough. You’ve made a really small Ellipse
and you’re trying to stretch it really big. Photoshop is just kind of smooshing
it around the place. The other thing we’re going to do
just because it’s kind of cool… under the ‘Shape Dynamics’, we’re going
to say there is a ‘Minimum Diameter’. Can you see the edges here? Because that one that I did
have really pointy ends out of the three. Let’s have a little look and compare them,
so I’ve got one layer. Go to my ‘Paths’, right click. ‘Stroke Path’. Makes a brush, all good. Simulate Pressure is going
to put pointy ends. What I want to do is make
another layer; I’ll turn that one off. Go back to my ‘Paths’… but before I go and add the Stroke… I’m going to say it’s
got a Minimum Diameter. Can you see there, it’s going to have a– that’s as small as the line’s going to get,
it’s not going to be pointy anymore. ‘Stroke Path’. Depends on what you’re looking for. Let’s go through it one more time
from the top, and make a new layer. I’m going to grab my ‘Curvature Tool’,
and I’m going to draw my ‘8’. Make sure it’s on ‘Path’,
and I’m going to say… “I want you to start kind of there.” Right down here. Curvature Tool, just clicking,
nothing held down, no dragging. Great if you’re doing infinity designs. If you are not happy
with the final result… you can jump in to this white arrow here,
the Direct Selection Tool. Hold down the ‘Path Selection’,
grab this, click any of the Anchor Points. And you can make adjustments
to kind of get it more how you want. I’m happy enough with it. I lie, I spent ages grappling with that. That will do, it’s enough. I get one more. No. I think it was better
before I started touching it. Anyway, I want to move the whole thing. So I’m going to grab the
‘Path Selection Tool’… grab any of the edges and just move it up. I’ve got my own layer,
I’m going to go to ‘Paths’. I’ve done it totally wrong, all of this
has been smooshed on to one layer. So what I’m going to do is
select it, cut it, new path, paste it. So it’s on its own Path Layer,
and this one’s going to be the 8. So you should do that first. Make a new layer, come into ‘Paths’,
make a new path, then start drawing the 8. Do as I say, not as I do. With ‘8’ selected I’m going to
‘Stroke Path’, ‘Mixer Brush’. You can see it’s starting
wherever I started… so if I was going to do
it again I’d probably… start doing my path at the top here… because it looks kind of weird this way,
but it will do. To get rid of this line in the center here
just click anywhere out of the path. Go back to ‘Layers’, and what I want
to do is get them to interlock. One goes over the top, one goes underneath. Actually, I grab my ‘Move Tool’,
and maybe… rotate it around a bit. Look at this. Ah, so bad. I’m rotating it around so I can
hide this little join here. And I want to do two things, I want
that to go underneath and this to go above. So I need a version of this, the 8,
so I’m going to duplicate it. Maybe one above and one below the 3,
there we go. 3 is sandwich, the top one,
I want to add a Layer Mask… and I grab my ‘Brush Tool’, make sure
the foreground color is set to black. Painting on the mask,
and I’m just going to paint this bit out. Things are really easy to do,
this kind of interlocking thing… as long as there’s one at the top,
one at the bottom… and use Mask1 at the top. So that’s how to do our
fake 3D interlocking path 38. I will see you in the next tutorial. Hello, it is time for your project. Using the techniques we learned
in the previous two videos… you can either hand draw it
or you can use the Path option. I’d like you to create your own text. It can be a name, could be your age,
like me, favorite food. Random word like cream,
because you like the shape of it. In your 15 3D folder there’s
a class project folder. I’ve given you two backgrounds
that you can use, up to you. You can find other ones
on Unsplash or Pexel… or it can just be a plain background,
maybe a Gradient. But use the techniques you’ve learnt. Create something and send it to me,
share it with everybody. Either in the assignments
on this page, the comments… or share with me on social media. Remember, on Instagram I am
bringyourownlaptop. On Twitter I am Danlovesadobe. Show me what you’ve made,
let’s get on to the next video. Hi there, it’s me again. If you enjoyed the video, could
you give it a thumbs up. Consider subscribing to my channel as well,
I give away lots of this free stuff. This particular video is… just one video of over
a hundred videos… that’s in my full
Photoshop Advanced course. So there’ll be a link in
the description for that. If you want to, go check that out. All right, happy YouTubeing.