Learn ALL about Adobe PREMIERE RUSH in 15 minutes – step by step basics beginners tutorial

Learn ALL about Adobe PREMIERE RUSH in 15 minutes – step by step basics beginners tutorial

January 15, 2020 5 By Peter Engel


Hello creative filmmakers,
thanks for watching Orange83. Today I’m going to get you started
on editing your own videos inside Adobe Premiere Rush. Before we start I want to mention
that you can find all the timestamps in the video description
for each part of this tutorial. This video is brought you
by Envato Elements, your source for unlimited digital assets,
like stock footage, video templates, music, sound effects, fonts and more. Premiere Rush is a brand-new
video editing app released by Adobe last November
during the Adobe Max event. And compared to its bigger
brother Premiere Pro, Adobe Premiere Rush is a more
lightweight video editing app which you can also use on mobile
devices, like your phone or tablet. It is available on iOS, Mac OS, Windows,
and Android is coming soon. Premiere Rush is very accessible for
people who just started with video editing, but this doesn’t mean that it’s not
for advanced or professional users, because it’s actually
a very powerful app. Although it’s a bit limited compared
to Premiere Pro, you can still make awesome
things with this app. Okay, enough introduction, let’s open
up Premiere Rush and start editing. The first time you start up
Premiere Rush you will be prompted with
this introduction tour. We’re going to skip this for now because you’ve got this tutorial
which is much better. By the way, I’m using Premiere Rush
on a Windows PC, but on Mac OS or iOS
it will look similar. Let’s start a new project by clicking
on this big blue button over here. Then I can choose where
I want to import my media from. You could choose local folders, online
storage like Dropbox, for example, or you could browse the network for
shares, if you have any available. Adobe also included some sample
footage if you want to practice. You can find this here. I’m going to use media like
video clips, photos and music from Envato Elements for this demo,
which is located in my downloads folder. I will now select all the files that
we’re going to use for the project. You can do this with your mouse
if you’re on PC or Mac. If you are on a tablet or phone
you need to select them one by one. Premiere Rush will now import
the files in order based on the number which
is shown on the thumbnail. You could change the order by deselecting
and selecting the media again. Here on the bottom you can see an overview of the files
that we’re going to import, including the music track. At the bottom of the screen
you can see… …that the check box is enabled
for ‘Sync with Creative Cloud’. If enabled, this means
that your project, including the media that
you’re going to import will be synced with your
personal Creative Cloud. This could simply be used for a backup,
but it might also be very useful if you start editing on your
desktop, for example, and want to continue working
on your laptop while traveling. And next to that we’ve got
the option to copy media. This option copies all
the media to your local storage. This might be very useful if you
use media from a cloud environment or maybe from a network. But remember that this
will fill up your hard drive. Okay, so now we’ve selected all the
clips that we want to use for the project and we can now continue
by clicking on the Create button here at the right bottom corner. And, as you can see, Premiere
now needs a few seconds to process the media
that we imported. After processing the files
we can now see the very clean layout
of Adobe Premiere Rush. You can clearly see that this was also
designed to be used on mobile devices. Anyway, let’s quickly walk you
through the panels. On the left you’ll find two buttons on top, one to add a Title, Import Media
or add a Voiceover and underneath that there’s
a box icon button to view all the media that
you already imported into your project. If you click the button again then
the panel will collapse again and this counts for all the buttons
or panels inside Premiere Rush, and this way you can keep your
workspace very clean and tidy. On top in the center you’ll find the preview
monitor which will display your projects based on the position of the playhead. And this playhead can be
found on the timeline which you’ll find
on the bottom of the screen. And as you can see, Premiere Rush
already placed all the items that we imported in order
on the timeline. We’ll get back on that later on
in this tutorial. On the top right panel you’ll find
editing options for adding text, color corrections, transitions,
sound optimization and a lot more, which we’ll get to later on. And you will find the last controls
here in the left bottom corner. These are mainly controls for the timeline,
which we’ll start with right now. You can use the scroll wheel
on your mouse to move from left to right on the timeline. Combine this with the Alt key
and you can zoom in and out. Next, we’re going to cut
a clip in two parts. Move the playhead to the position
where you want to add a cut and then click this Scissor icon
here on the left, and, as stated here, you could
also use ctrl + K. This will cut the clip in two parts. Now let’s say we want
to remove the second part, then we need to select it on the timeline
and then click on this trash bin icon here. This will simply remove the
selected item on the timeline. And, as you’ve seen, Premiere
now automatically filled the gap between the first clip
and the rest of the project. It’s almost as if they are magnetic. And we can do more on the timeline. We can select the clip and then
we can also duplicate the clip, we can do this with this icon here. Then Premiere will automatically
add this after the selected clip, and as you can see here, we’ve
now cut two identical copies. If you select the clip on the timeline you
can then drag it over to any place you like. You can also put it on a second
track above another clip and you can do this in multiple layers. Keep in mind that Premiere will always
display the clip that is highest in stack. Let’s give this a quick playback
to show you what I mean. You can hit the spacebar
to start playback. As you can see, Premiere only displays
the clip that is on the highest track. Okay, the next options for the
timeline can be found here. If you click this icon it will make the audio
tracks visible related to the video clips. Most of the clips I’m using don’t have
any audio at all, or an empty audio track, but this one contains audio,
as you can see by the graph. [waves ambience sound] Later on in this tutorial I’ll show
you how to improve the audio, so stay tuned for that. For now, we’ve got one button left here
in the left bottom corner, and this enables the
Control Tracks option. And now you’ve got this
little track option icon here. You can hide or unhide
the track with it, you can mute or unmute it,
or you can lock a track. With this lock enabled you
can’t change anything to the track. And for the audio tracks we’ve
also got this microphone icon which you can use to record a voice over. If we click on the record button
it will start a countdown. And you can see the voice over recording
here appearing on the timeline. Hit the button again to stop recording. And now we’ve added this beautiful voice
over which we’re going to delete. And deleting can also be done
by selecting it on the timeline and then press the Delete
key on your keyboard. Next, I’ll quickly show you how to extend
or how to shorten the duration of a clip. You can simply do this by selecting the clip
and then move over to the edge of the clip. There you will get this yellow icon which
you can move to the left or the right and you can do this by the end
and also the beginning of the clip. And also, in this case, the other
clips stays perfectly attached. Now it’s time to show you
some more editing options. First we’re going to skip forward
to one of the clips on the timeline. This clip does not fill up
the entire frame and that’s because this video
has a lower resolution. This one is 1080p and
the other clips are 4K. We can fix that inside the so called
‘Crop and Rotation’ panel which you can find here. We can fix this by scaling the clip to 200%
which is also the max for scaling. I would have liked to have more
room to play with here, so, Adobe, if you’re watching this, please
add this to the improvement list. Okay, so what else do we have
in this panel. On top of the panel we’ve got
the position sliders which you can use to change horizontal
and vertical position for a clip, and there’s also slider for rotation. And, by the way, you can double-click
on one of the points to reset the value. Further below in the Advanced section
we also find some crop options. With the crop sliders you can cut off
a part of the clip left, right, bottom and top. And on the bottom we’ve
also got a slider for Opacity. With this slider you can add a certain
amount of transparency to the clip. Let’s take one of the stacked
clips as an example. If I lower the opacity you can
see that the clip below slightly is coming through the top one. And the last slider on the bottom
is to feather the edges of the clip. I can show this best when
I scale down one of the clips. I increase the feather, as you
can see, by the edge of this clip. Okay, that’s it for this panel. Let’s move on to the Audio Panel
where we’ve got some nice sound optimization options. To demonstrate this one, we first
need to import a clip which also contains a voice audio. So, to do this, we go to the
blue ‘+’ icon and then click Media. Then I’m going to navigate
to the sample media and I’m going to select one of the
clips there and add it to the project. The new clip is added to the timeline. Let’s select it and then
move over to the Audio Panel. Inside the Basic section you can
use the slider to set the volume. You can also mute the track
if you like to. But the more exciting stuff can be
found in the Advanced section. Here you can see that Premiere
detected voice audio. But if that’s incorrect you
can always change it here. And that’s necessary because each type
of audio has its own optimization options. Let’s take a quick listen to the difference,
if I enable balanced sound and reduce background noise. [Voice audio playing back] So this makes a lot of difference. But don’t overuse it, because
it will sound artificial. Let’s also quickly take a listen to the Reduce Echo
and Enhance Speech options. [Voice audio playing back] A lot of interesting optimization options
for different situations. If you take a look at the timeline
you can see that there’s a dark green area
underneath this clip. This dark area is on the audio
graph of the music track. On that part, the background music
is reduced in volume. If I select the clip, then you can see that
this is because Auto Duck is enabled. So this option reduces volume
of the music as soon as there’s a clip with
voice audio on top of it. You could directly see the
difference if I disable this. The dark green part is now gone. And now it’s enabled again, as you
can see, by the dark green part here. And we’ve also got a Channels section. There you can enable or disable
the left or right track, that’s all. Next, we’re going to have a look at some
color grading and color correction options. I will select one of the clips and
then move over to the Color Panel. Inside this Color Panel you can choose
from a bunch of built-in presets. You could see these as Instagram filters, and if you’re more familiar
with color grading then you could compare them with LUTs. There’s also a ‘Your Presets’ section. Here you can save your own templates. And you can build them
inside the Edit tab. Inside the Basic section you’ve got all
kinds of sliders for correcting exposure, contrast, highlights, shadows, etc. And once you have changed all the
necessary settings for your video clip, then you can save them
as your own preset. And to do this, click on the three dots
here and then select Create Preset. You can then come up with
a very original name for your preset and then click OK. If I go back to the Presets tab, inside the Your Presets section you
will find your own created preset. And there’s even more inside the Edit tab. If we go to the Advanced section we’ve
got the option to add a Faded Film effect, and also increase or
decrease sharpening. And last but not least, we
can also add a beautiful vignette. We can change the amount
and the feather. And next we’ll quickly take
a look at transitions. When we look inside the Transition Panel
we’ll find three presets and these transitions are
the most common transitions that you’ll find in any other program. It is the Cross Dissolve, the Dip
to White and the Dip to Black transition. You can simply drag this
over to the timeline and put them right between two clips. If you select the transition
on the timeline you can then also edit the
duration of the transition. You can do this with a slider or you can also simply type
the number of seconds here. It is also an option to apply the Cross
Dissolve transition to an audio track. This way you can make the
audio track fade in or fade out. In the final part of this tutorial
we’re going to look at Titles. And you guessed it right, we need
to move over to the Titles Panel. In this panel you can choose from
a lot of pre-installed templates. Inside the ‘My Templates’ tab you will find the templates that
are already available on your machine. Inside the Adobe Stock tab you can also
browse online for some more templates. And if you found something
that you like you can simply drag it over
to the timeline to apply it. It might take a few seconds to load. Once it is loaded, you can then change
almost anything to your preferences. Simply select the Title item
on the timeline and then go to the Edit tab to change
all things, like fonts, size, colors and more. And if you would like to reuse them again
you can also save them as a template. Click on the three dots
and select ‘Save Template as’, then again give it a perfect name
and click ‘Save’. And another option would be
to install third-party templates. For that you need to click
on Install Template here and then you need to browse
to the template file. I’ve got a few free templates
for you available. Check the links in the video description
if you want to learn more. There is just one more thing cover in this tutorial and that is exporting your video. Let’s say we finished our project and now we want to export this awesome movie. For that we need to go to the share tab here on top. And as you can see we have a got a couple of destination options. The first option is local. That means that your movie will be exported to your local drive. You can change the name of the exported file here. You can set the destination folder here if you need to. And you can see the estimated file size underneath that. And inside advanced settings you’ll see that Premiere Rush has automatically set a couple of things for you. Only if you export the movie for online usage then I would recommend to use a preset. You can find a couple of presets in this pull-down menu. For all other purposes I would recommend to use the automatic settings. And one last thing You can always lower the quality if you want to reduce the file-size. But if that’s not necessary than always stick to high. It is also an option to directly upload to Youtube, Facebook, Instagram or Behance. If you would like to use that then you first need to sign in here. But in most common cases you will first export the files to your local drive. And after reviewing, manually upload them to the online services.