Night photography – quick tips – Canon

Night photography – quick tips – Canon

January 20, 2020 30 By Peter Engel


NIGHT CITYSCAPES:
LEARN FROM THE PROFESSIONALS There’re three things to remember if
you want to master night photography. You need to be thinking
about stability of the camera, the settings of the camera itself, and
also the optical quality of the lenses. Night time’s set in, and,
for the best quality pictures, I’d always suggest
using the lowest ISO possible. In combination with what’s
going to be a slow shutter speed, I’ve got my
camera set to ISO 100. That requires my camera
to be completely stable. Use a cable release or
remote to isolate any movement away from the camera body
when depressing the shutter. Shoot on a prime lens,
or a good quality zoom lens. For this shot I’ve
chosen a 50 mm to put an emphasis
on the city skyline. With regards to
aperture, I’ve gone for 5.6 as I know it’s
pin-sharp on this 50 mm. Try manually focussing
on your point of interest using Live View at
maximum magnification. It’s a great way to get
the best detail in your pictures. But, remember to keep
the lens on manual focus. I’ve got my shutter
speed set at 8 seconds to capture this
great shot of the city and to place emphasis
on the dramatic sky. Working at night gives
you incredible flexibility. I’m now going to use
a faster shutter speed to shift the emphasis
onto the city lights. Most scenes at night are a heady
mixture of different light sources. So you can, like exposure, make some creative
choices about white balance. By selecting Tungsten, the camera’s going to correct
for all the warm tones in the picture, and I’m actually going to get quite
a bluey-green finish to the image. In contrast to the first
picture, by selecting Daylight, the image is going to
come out a lot warmer, and the lights are going to
have an orange glow to them. I’ve moved to a busy part of the
city to shoot some moving traffic. With a slow shutter speed
it’s going to leave light trails right across the frame. My priority here is shutter speed. I’ve got it set at 4
seconds on ISO 200 and F14, which gives me the correct exposure. It’s quite a long exposure, so I’ve still got my camera
on a tripod to keep it sharp. You can easily introduce
a subject into the foreground by adding in a bit of flash. The subject will be lit by a
burst of light from the flash. But they’re going to
have to be really still, as I’m still doing that long
exposure for the light trails. The camera’s in manual
mode, so I’ve got full control. Shutter speed’s at 2
seconds, aperture F11, ISO 200. Switch the flash on and make sure
your subject stands nice and still.