Photoshop BLENDING MODES – 8-Minute CRASH COURSE!

Photoshop BLENDING MODES – 8-Minute CRASH COURSE!

August 18, 2019 52 By Peter Engel


Welcome back to another very exiting tutorial
here at the Photoshop Training Channel.com My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. This video is going to be a crash course on
Blending Modes. You will also learn how you can quickly narrow
down your search and find the right Blending Mode for the result that you want. If you would like a deep-dive into Blending
Modes, then check out my 41-minute video, Blending Modes Explained, where I cover each
individual Blending Mode and how it works. There is a link to it, right below in the
description! Ok, let’s get started. Simply put, A Blending Mode takes the pixels
of one layer and blends them with the pixels of another layer to create a completely new
effect. Generally speaking, without Blending Modes,
the only real way of blending layers together is by reducing the Opacity or Fill, which
usually doesn’t give you the result that you are looking for. Layer Blending Modes allow you to do so much
more than reduce Opacity. They allow you to blend layers based on their
luminance value, color, and/or saturation. Since Photoshop CS5, released in 2010, there
have been 27-layer Blending Modes which can be found in an un-labeled dropdown in the
Layers panel. When working with Blending Modes, Photoshop
blends the pixels by performing a blend operation on each pixel of the Blend layer against its
corresponding pixel in the base layer. Put simply; the blend is applied to a single
pixel at a time to get the resulting blend. To make things easier to understand, I’ll
refer to pixels as “colors” since the word color may help your mind create a more
accurate representation of what is happening. But we’re always talking about pixels. You should also remember these three terms
to understand how Blending Modes work–Base, Blend, and Result. The Base is the original color. It is usually found directly below the Blend
color. The Blend is the color that is being applied
to the Base color. The mix of the Base and the Blend is the Result. In other words, Base + Blend=Result. How the Base and the Blend colors mix depends
on the Blending Mode that you select. You do not need to memorize each and every
single Blending Mode. You can simply memorize the 6 categories that
the Blending Modes are grouped into. This will help you narrow down your search
when you are looking for Blending Modes. In the Blending Mode drop-down you will notice
the 5 dividers that group the Blending Modes into 6 categories. Normal, Darken, Lighten, Contrast, Inversion,
and Component. The first group of Blending Modes is the Normal
group. These Blending Modes produce no change. You can only blend them with the layers below
by reducing the Opacity. Normal is the default Blending Mode for all
layers. And reducing the opacity blends it with the
layer below. The same is true for Dissolve, the other Blending
Mode in the Normal category. By reducing the Opacity, you reveal the pixels
below in a diffusion dither pattern. The next group is Darken. The Blending Modes in this group will make
the resulting blend darker. Notice that by selecting Multiply, the image
gets progressively darker where the center gradient is. And the white rectangle becomes invisible. The next group of Blending Modes is Lighten. These Blending do the opposite of the Darken
category. They make the resulting blend brighter. Notice that by selecting Screen, the image
gets progressively brighter where the center gradient is. And the black rectangle becomes invisible. Screen is the opposite of Multiply. The Contrast Blending Modes work by checking
if the pixels are either darker than 50% gray or lighter than 50% gray. If they are darker than 50% gray, then a darkening
Blend Mode is applied. Conversely, if the colors are brighter than
50% gray, then a brightening Mode is applied. Except for Hard Mix, all the Blending Modes
in this category turn 50% gray transparent. You can see that effect when I select Overlay. Notice that it both darkens and brightens
the image. And the 50% gray box in the center becomes
transparent. If you do not know what 50% gray is, you can
double-click on the Foreground Color, to bring up the Color Picker. The next group is Inversion. These Blending Modes look for variations between
the base and blend layers to create the blend. And, when you click-and-drag over the colors
you will notice this “B” label, that shows a percentage. That is the percentage that I am referring
to. So, 50% gray will be here. And of course, every color that you select
will have a brightness percentage. The difference Blending Mode is a good example. If I duplicate my background layer and change
the Blending Mode to Difference, the image will turn black. That’s Because there is no difference in
the blend and base layers. But if I select the Move Tool, and move the
layer you will see the difference in pixels. You could use this Blending Mode to align
layers with similar content. As you can see, the resulting blend from the
Blending Modes in this category is extreme, and they are generally not used very often. The final group is Component. The Blending Modes in this group use different
combinations of the primary color components: hue, saturation, and brightness; to create
the blend. This is a category of Blending Modes that
I use a lot. Especially when working with Adjustment Layers. I also think it’s the easiest to understand. For example, If I create a Curves Adjustment
layer, and make an extreme adjustment. You will that the image has more contrast
and more saturation. But if I select Luminosity. Notice how I only affect the luminance values
and not saturation. I could also select Color, and the colors
changes, but not the luminosity. Another example would be to create a Black
and White adjustment layer, which of course, makes everything black and white. And you can use the sliders in the Properties
to control the luminance values of the original colors to make a better black and white image. But if I change the Blending Mode to Luminosity,
the color comes back, and I can use the sliders to adjust the luminance of each color. Put simply when you select a blending mode
in this category it will only affect that component and not the others. So, if you select Color, it will only affect
the color but not the hue, saturation, or luminosity. To recap,
Blending Modes look at both the blend layer and base layer, to come up with the result. The result is determined by the Blending Mode
that you select. If you need the result to be dark, look for
Blending Modes in the Darken category. If you need the result to be bright, look
for Blending Modes in the Lighten category. If you need both a darker and brighter result,
the look for Blending Modes in the contrast category. If you would like to isolate a primary color
component, such as hue, saturation, or luminosity, then select a Blending Mode from the Component
category. Of course, there is a lot more to learn. If you are interested in a longer more comprehensive
video on Blending Modes, then check out my video, Blending Modes explained. There is a link in the description. I hope that you found this video helpful. Let me know in the comments what was the thing
that you liked the most about this tutorial. If you are new to the photoshop training channel,
don’t forget to click on that subscribe and notification buttons. Thank you so much for watching, and I’ll
talk to you again soon!