Photoshop CC 2015 Tutorial: How to Transform Photos into Jig-Saw Puzzles! (CC and later)

Photoshop CC 2015 Tutorial: How to Transform Photos into Jig-Saw Puzzles! (CC and later)

August 16, 2019 54 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
For those of you who are using Photoshop version CC and later, I’m going to show you how to
create this great jig-saw puzzle effect using a free plugin from Adobe, as well as how to
create this retro, Formica pattern background. Please note that this particular plugin is not work on versions earlier than CC. If your version is earlier than CC and are thinking
of upgrading, click the link in my video’s description for a 20% discount. Open an image
you’d like to make into the puzzle. I downloaded this image from Shutterstock. I provided this
image that we’ll make into a pattern later. Its link is located in my video’s description or project files. Go to Window and “Browse Extensions Online”. The “Adobe Add-ons” page
will open. If you’re not already signed into your Creative Cloud account, Adobe will ask you to sign in. Scroll down and click on “Photoshop” at the left. In the “Search” field, type in “puzzle” and press Enter or Return. Click “Free Puzzle Pieces”. When this page opens,
click “Install”. Minimize or close your Browser. Whether you’re on Windows or a Mac, locate
and open your “Downloads” folder. You’ll see a zip file that says,” Puzzlepieces”. Double-click it to open the file and open the “Puzzle Pieces” folder. Click “Puzzle.atn”. Immediately, in
the Actions panel, you’ll see a set of actions, “named, ” Puzzle”. If you don’t see the “Actions” panel, go to Window and “Actions”. I”ll expand the panel,
so we can see more of the 20 actions in the set. Each action will cut out between 2 and 192
puzzle pieces on separate layers. There are separate actions for different aspect ratios
and sizes within them. For this example, I’ll click 96 pieces on a 12 x 8 inch puzzle, however, you can choose whatever you like, but whatever you choose, we want to crop our image to that
size. Open your Crop Tool and type into the width and height fields the same size as listed
in the action you chose. Make sure you type in “in” for inches. Make its resolution 150 pixels per inch. Make sure “Delete Cropped Pixels” is checked. Click the check-mark to crop your image. To fit it back onto your canvas, press Ctrl or Cmd + 0. Click the Play button to play the puzzle action. Notice the action is creating individual layers that
will comprise this particular puzzle. Since the puzzle I chose for this example has 96
pieces, there’ll be 96 separate layers created in my Layers panel. You can see the selections
of each puzzle piece being created by the action. When it finishes the last puzzle piece,
this message will appear. It’s telling us that we can adjust the bevel and drop shadow
of all the puzzle pieces and by clicking “Continue”, we should look at the top left puzzle piece
as a visual reference for all the pieces. If we want to make adjustments to the bevel
and/or drop shadow, we can do it here in the Layer Style window. In this case, I’ll leave
their settings as is, so I’ll click OK. Instantly, all the pieces took on those attributes for
their bevels and drop shadows. Now that we made out puzzle, it’s time to make space all
around it, so we can add our background behind our puzzle. Go to Image and “Canvas Size”.
Your canvas size is presently the same as your Image size. I’ll add 7 to 8 inches all
around the puzzle. We can always crop it down later if we want. Then, click OK. To see your entire document, press Ctrl or Cmd + 0. Open the retro, Formica image I provided. To make
it into a pattern, open your Move Tool and go to Edit and “Define Pattern”. Name it whatever
you’d like and click OK. Open back your puzzle document and in the Layers panel, scroll to
the bottom. Make your background active and click the Adjustment layer icon. Click “Pattern” and click OK. As you can see, the Pattern adjustment made that one panel into an entire pattern. To see more of the Layers panel, drag its bottom down. Let’s start re-positioning
individual puzzle pieces. make sure “Auto Select” is checked. This automatically activates
the corresponding puzzle piece that we click on. Go to “View” and make sure “Snap” is not
checked. If it is, just click on it to deactivate it. Drag one of your puzzle pieces from its position. To angle it, open your Transform ssing Ctrl or Cmd + T. Go to a corner and when you see a curved, double-arrow, rotate it to an angle you like. Then, press
Enter or Return to accept it. Continue these steps for other puzzle pieces that you’d like to reposition. If you want a particular piece to be on top of other pieces, drag that particular
puzzle piece to the top of the Layers panel. Continue to move pieces until your happy with
their positions and angles. Next, we’ll add a drop shadow to the entire puzzle. First
let’s group all the puzzle pieces into a folder. To do this, drag the slider to the bottom
of the Layers panel and make the bottom puzzle piece layer active. Drag the slider to the
top and Shift-click on the top layer to make all the puzzle pieces active. Press Ctrl or
Cmd + G to place all of them into a folder. Click the “fx” icon and click “Drop Shadow”. Change the Blend Mode to “Linear Burn” and the Opacity to 40%. Uncheck “Global Light” and for the Angle, type in 90. Make the Distance: 12 pixels and the Size: 15 pixels. Click “Bevel & Emboss”. The Style is “Inner Bevel”, the Technique is “Smooth, the Depth is 100% and
the Direction is “Up”. Make the Size: 4 pixels and uncheck Global Light. Make the Angle approximately 143 degrees and the Altitude: 30 degrees. Make the Highlight Mode: Linear Dodge the
Opacity: 80%. The Shadow Blend Mode is Multiply and its Opacity is 50%. Then, click OK. Next, we’ll angle our puzzle in perspective. Make a composite snapshot of your entire image
by pressing Ctrl + Shift + Alt + E on Windows or Cmd + Shift + Option + E on a Mac. Zoom out of your document by pressing Ctrl or Cmd and the minus key on your keyboard. Go to Edit, Transform and “Perspective”. Go to a bottom corner and drag it out until you like
its perspective. Then, press Enter or Return. To crop your image, open your Rectangular
Marquee Tool and drag a rectangular selection over your document. Go to Image and Crop.
Then, fit it back onto your canvas. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!