Photoshop CC 2018: Create Beautiful Mandalas & Spirographs using Variable Radial Symmetry.

Photoshop CC 2018: Create Beautiful Mandalas & Spirographs using Variable Radial Symmetry.

August 19, 2019 50 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue lightning TV. Photoshop version CC has a feature that many
people don’t know it has. It’s called “Variable Radial Symmetry”. This feature essentially allows you to draw beautiful spirographs or mandalas with your brush or pencil tools. Create a new document by going to File and New. I’ll make the Width and Height 1000 pixels
each and its Resolution: 150 pixels per inch, however, you can make them whatever size you’d like. The Color is RGB and 8 bits per channel. Open the Background Contents and pick white
or you can click the box and pick white. Then, click “Create” or Open. In order to open the symmetry feature, we
need to enable it in our Preferences. Go to Edit, Preferences and “Technology Previews”. Check “Enable Paint Symmetry”. I’ll open my Pencil Tool, however, you can also use the Brush Tool. If you’re using the Pencil Tool, as well,
open your Pencil Picker. Make its Size anywhere from 2 to 5 pixels
with a Hardness and Opacity of 100%. If you’re using version CC 2018, you have
an additional feature called, “Smoothing”. This feature smooths out your brush strokes
in real time. So, for example, if the Smoothing is 0, you
‘ll see that when I draw, the lines are kind of jittery. I’ll press Ctrl or Cmd + z to undo it. When I increase Smoothing to 100, my lines
are much smoother. I’ll cover the Smoothing feature in more detail
in a future tutorial. For now, I’ll keep it at 100%. Click the butterfly icon to open the list
of symmetries from which you can choose. To create a mandala or spirograph, click “New Dual Axis”. This creates a vertical and horizontal line as reference. It opens with a Transform Tool’s bounding
box that can be resized, repositioned,stretched or squeezed. However, since we’re creating a symmetrical
mandala spirograph, let’s accept it’s default symmetry as it is by clicking the check-mark at the top. Open your Paths path panel. If you don’t see it, go to Window and Paths. We can create a mandala by either renaming our path, “Radial Symmetry 12″ or ” Mandala Symmetry 10″. The radial symmetry maximum amount is 12, while the mandala symmetry maximum amount is 10. We’ll see the difference between the two symmetries
in a moment. As we paint on our document, Photoshop repeats
and rotates the paint strokes around the radial axis. However, if we want to mirror our paint strokes, we’ll rename the path, “Mandala Symmetry 10”. Since we’ll make this into our finished mandala,
open the Layers panel and click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. We’ll use this empty layer to paint the strokes
and use the background layer for the background. This time, as we paint, Photoshop is mirroring
the strokes as it rotates them around the axis. Make the background active Let’s fill it with gradient colors. Open your Gradient Tool and make sure the
Radial Gradient icon is active. Open your gradient thumbnails. You can click any one of these or to see more
choices, click the gear icon. I’ll click “the “Noise Samples” preset, but
feel free to choose whatever you like. When you see this message, click OK to replace your current gradients with the gradients you just picked. I’ll click this one. Once you click yours, go to the center of your design and press
and hold the Shift key as you drag straight across. Make the mandala active and click the New
Layer icon to make a new layer above it. In this empty layer we’ll create another gradient,
which will fill the mandala. To do this, we need to clip this gradient
to the mandala, so as to not fill the background. Press Ctrl + Alt + G on Windows or Cmd + Option + G on a Mac or you can go to Layer and “Create Clipping Mask”. Click a different gradient. Go to the center and this time, I’ll drag it to the upper, right. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!