Photoshop: How to Create a Vintage TV Interference GLITCH Portrait

Photoshop: How to Create a Vintage TV Interference GLITCH Portrait

August 29, 2019 22 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. I’m going to show you how to quickly create
a vintage, black and white, CRT TV interference glitch. This is an update of tutorials I’ve done on
earlier versions of Photoshop. I provided this image of shape of a cathode
ray tube TV screen. its link is in my video’s description
or project files. Before we begin, if you’re not already a subscriber
to my channel, hit that small, Subscriber button at the lower, right corner. If I’ve helped you learn or improve in Photoshop
and you’d like to help support my channel, become a channel member by clicking the “Join”
button below the video or become a patron by clicking the Patreon card at the upper,
right. Either way, you’ll be helping to keep my tutorials
free. Open a photo of someone or something that
you’d like to use for this project. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock. To ensure that the setting amounts that will
have similar results as mine, check your photo’s size and resolution. Go to Image and Image Size. Make its resolution 72 pixels per inch and
its width and height somewhere in this neighborhood. To place the photo onto the TV shape I provided,
make sure your Move Tool is open. If it isn’t, press “v” on your keyboard. Drag the photo onto the tab of the TV shape. Without releasing your mouse or pen, press
and hold “Shift”, drag it down and release. Pressing Shift kept your photo centered. Unlock the TV shape and drag it above your photo. Change its Blend Mode to “Multiply”. If you want to resize your photo inside the
shape, make your photo active and open your Transform Tool by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + T.
Go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, press and hold Alt or Option
+ Shift as you drag it in or out. Then, press Enter or Return. Next, we’ll create scan lines. Make a new layer below the active layer by
Ctrl-clicking or Cmd-clicking the New Layer icon. We’ll fill the empty layer with 50% gray. To do this, press Shift + the F5 key at the
top of your keyboard to open the “Fill” window. Or you can go to Edit and “Fill”. Open the “Contents” list and click “50% grey”. Make sure your foreground and background colors
are black and white respectively. If they’re not, press “D” on your keyboard. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the “Sketch” folder and click “Halftone Pattern”. The Pattern Type is “Line”, the Size is 1
and the Contrast is 49. Change the Blend Mode to “Soft Light”. Because CRT TV monitors weren’t high-definition,
all the images tended to have a soft blur to them. We’ll blur the scan lines slightly, but before
we do, we’ll convert the scan lines into a Smart Object, so we can affect it non-destructively. To do this, click the icon at the upper, right
of the Layers panel and click, “Convert to Smart Object”. Then, go to Filter, Blur and Gaussian Blur. Blur it 1 pixel. To save space in the Layers panel, let’s collapse
the effect. We’ll convert our photo into Smart Object,
as well, so we can modify it non-destructively and if we decide to replace the photo with
a different one, we won’t have to redo any of the effects. Go back to Filter, Blur and Gaussian Blur. We’ll blur it 2 pixels. Click the Adjustment Layer icon and click
“Black & White”. This removes all the color. Since CRT TV images tend to be a bit a bit
brighter in the center, we’ll give our image a soft, vignette along the edges. Make the photo layer active and go to Filter
and “Lens Correction”. Open the “Custom” tab and drag the “Vignette”
slider all the way to the left. To make the vignette stronger, open the last
filter by pressing Alt + Ctrl + F on Windows or Option + Cmd + F on a Mac. As before, click the “Custom” tab and slide
the Vignette all the way to the left and the “Midpoint” to +25 or you can just type it
in. We’ll convert our photo with all its effects
into a Smart Object. Click the Black and White adjustment layer
and Shift-click the photo to make both active. Then, convert them into one Smart Object. Make two copies of the photo by pressing Ctrl
or Cmd + J twice. We won’t be using the bottom layer from here
on out, but it’s always a good idea to keep one layer unmodified, just in case you want
to use it at a later point. Hide that layer and temporarily hide the top
photo, as well. Make the middle photo active and go to Edit,
Transform and Skew. Go to the top, middle anchor point and drag
it to the right, which skews your photo. Then, press Enter or Return. Make two copies of the skewed layer and then
hide the top copy. Make the middle skewed layer active and change
its Blend Mode to “Soft Light” and its Opacity to 50%. Press and hold Shift as you click the Left
arrow on your keyboard a few times to move the layer to the left. Shift-click the skewed layer under it to make
it active, as well. Press and hold Shift as you drag them to the left. Make the top, skewed layer visible and active. Change its Blend to Soft Light and reduce
its Opacity to 70%. Press and hold Shift as you drag it to the
right. I’d like to get rid of the darker shape over
the face. There may be areas you’d like to eliminate. To do this, click the Layer Mask icon to make
a layer mask. Open your Brush Tool and Brush Picker. We’ll adjust the size in a moment. The Hardness is 0% and I’ll make the Opacity
and Flow: 100%. To adjust the size of your brush, make sure
your CapsLock key is off and press the right or left bracket key on your keyboard. Brush over the unwanted area to mask it out. Make the photo above it visible and active. Make three copies of it and temporarily hide them. Go to Filter, Distort and “Shear”. Drag the middle vertical line at various points
to warp your image. Open your Rectangular Marquee Tool and make
sure the “Add To” icon is active. This will allow you to add multiple rectangular
selections on the same layer. Drag the tool over different areas of your
image to make selections over it.. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer
mask of the selections next to the active layer. What’s happening is that the white rectangles
in the layer mask are revealing the sheared image, while the black areas of the layer
mask are being masked out, thereby revealing the layers under it in the Layers panel. Collapse the effect and make the layer above
it visible and active. Go back to Filter, Distort and “Shear”. To reset the Shear filter, press and Ctrl or Cmd. The “Cancel” button instantly changes to “Default”. Keep pressing holding Ctrl or Cmd as you click
the Default button. This resets the Shear filter. Drag the vertical line to various points to
create another sheared effect. We’ll add an inverted layer mask next to the
active layer by Alt-clicking or Option-clicking the Layer Mask icon. This masks out or hides the new sheared layer. We’ll reveal back areas of it, by dragging
your Rectangular Marquee tool across your image. We’ll fill the selection with white and since
your background color is white, press Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. This immediately reveals the new sheared image
though the white areas of your Layer Mask. Deselect it and collapse the effect. Make the layer above it visible and active. Go to Filter, Distort and Wave. Feel free to experiment with the settings,
however, I’ll make the number of generators: 402, the Wavelength: 1 and 2, the Amplitude:
1 and 106 and the Scale both 100%. The Type is “Sine” and the Undefined Areas:
“Repeat Edge Pixels”. Make an inverted layer mask next to the active layer. Drag a vertical, rectangular selection over
your image and fill it with white. Then, deselect it. Make the layer active and go to Filter, Blur
and Gaussian Blur. Blur it 1 pixel. Collapse the effects. Make the top face layer visible and active
and go back to Filter, Distort and Wave. I’ll drag the slider of the number of generators
all the way to the right. For the Wavelength, I’ll type in 798 in the
Minimum field and click the Maximum field. Immediately, the Maximum fills with 799. For the Amplitude, I’ll type in 998 in the
Minimum field and click the Maximum field, which automatically fills it with 999. For the Scale, I’ll type in 1 in the Vertical field. As soon as I click OK, the Vertical scale
changes to 1%. This creates thin, stacked, horizontal lines. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!