Photoshop Refresher Part 1

Photoshop Refresher Part 1

October 4, 2019 0 By Peter Engel


OK, this is going to be an introduction
to Photoshop. In theory, you will already know Photoshop from a
previous class, however I know that sometimes things can kinda
escape from the brain while you are in between classes. So I’m going to go over some the basic
items that you find in Photoshop. The first thing to mention is I
like my palatte set up in a specific way. I have styles here …most of the styles, by
the way, really gross… and we’ll get into at some point. I have my history, which is like “undo” except that it keeps a visual representation of things and
you can kind of go back to certain points and we’ll get into that too. And I have
“character” – this for text. I have my layers, which is very important
and then down at the bottom I have info. Now bear in mind that I’m working with
this ridiculously large screen, so I can spread these things out. You
may not want a certain palette to open in certain times, or you may want to move them around in a method that suits you best so… First things first! File>open works the same way as File>Open in
pretty much every program you will ever experience. File>New will start a new file and you can set the width and
height in pixels. You can set the resolution and the
background contents be white, the background color, which we’ll get
into, and transparent. For right now though, I just wanna work with this file to build up a picture of the Chrome logo (that’s Google Chrome, a browser), because it’s very colorful and unique.
Notice here on the Layers palette that has a lock
symbol – this means if I make changes to it like, say I delete a portion of it, it’s
going to fill it with the background color right here. Well I don’t want that, I want it
to be transparent, so I’m going to actually double click on that lock, I actually double click on
the whole layer area and I’m just going to say “OK” (to the dialogue that pops up). This unlocks it, so now if I delete, we have
a transparent space there. To make a new layer, we have a whole
bunch of little buttons down here, and we want the
New Layer button, which creates a new layer. By the way, if you hover over things, they’ll usually pop up a Tooltip and
that works, of course, for Mac and PC. So now, here I have this layer, now I’m just going to draw a square. So now, I can actually move around
that square and it’s on the top of this layer, and I can reorder things by clicking and
holding down. Notice how it changes to a little hand – I click, hold down, and drag beneath that other layer. Now that
layer is on top. We can’t see what’s on the bottom because
this layer takes up the whole image, you can see by the little icon there, and drag this back to the top. Layers allow you to stack things and work with them separately. It’s very
helpful and it’s something that you will want to use constantly. You don’t really
work in one layer unless you have a specific reason for doing so. Sometimes if you are painting, you might prefer to do that. So let’s
get into the actual toolbars. You’ll notice that
up here, I have have this little icon is highlighted, and I’ve been moving
things around. You will find it uncanny then that is
called the “Move” tool as we have her over at
Move Tool. Here is the marquee tool, so I can click
and hold down and draw a square, and then I can
manipulate only that space. For instance, if I want
to I can just delete in that area. As I move it, you
can see through it. Now in order to make that
Selection go away, you would use control or command “d”. Control the if you’re using a PC, and Command D or Apple D? I don’t see an Apple on the keyboard! Anyway, Command or Control D deselects, hence the “d”. If you forget that, though, you
can always find these things under (dropdown menu) Select>Deselect. This is a good time to mention that
there’s also “select all”, which takes everything. This is a
huge image by the way, (which I’ll get to zooming in a moment) and Select>Inverse. Say I selected this portion here but then I realized
what I want to actually do is select everything BUT that, I go up to
Select>Inverse. Now, you see the little “marching
ants” (visual item) there around everything. If I were to use
some other If I were to use some other tool there, you can see that it covers up everything but what I’ve selected. Now notice I’m going to go over here
to the history palette for just a moment and I’m going to jump back – So I can go all the way back to when I didn’t have anything up there. I can go all the way back down, but I
won’t. I can Command D to Deselect. I’m actually going to move this layer so we can
see a bit more that you can see through it. There’s actually other Marquee tools there,
you can make an ellipse, or a single row of things. I never use those
frankly, but I know that they have some sort of use. With the same idea, you have the Lasso tool, so say you wanted to select around an unusual shape, you can do that. Notice the little “marching ants.” There’s also a couple other Lasso tools which
I’ll let you explore. In the same kind of vein as that, we
have the Magic Wand Tool. This allows you to select specific
colors. Now, I’m going to jump down to the Google Chrome logo here layer, and because I can actually show this you. Keep in mind that anytime you want to affect
something, you have to select its layer in the Layers panel. I’m clicking this red
here, Now what it’s doing then is selecting an
area that is similar to what I clicked on, so
it’s the tolerance is set kinda low on this so that means it’s only going to select very little shades of red. If I up (increase) the tolerance to, say, 50, it’s going to select more of that red. I
can hold down SHIFT and it will add to my selection. Notice that it’s selecting only the red.
Or if I go over here, only the pink. So you have to adjust the tolerance at
different points. If I was to press Delete right now, then of course, it will delete only what I have
selected. We have the Crop Tool and that does
essentially what the name implies. Say I only wanted a
specific portion of the image I can drag it out you’ll
notice that it darkens everything else. I double click inside of that (not in the
center because that’s something else) and then it crops, meaning it gets rid of all the other stuff around it.
We have the eyedropper tool which now I’m going to jump down because
this actually relates to the colors down here I’m going to jump all the way down to the bottom of this palette, and we’ll notice here we have foreground color background-color: What this means is if I’m using some
sort of tool, it’s going to automatically select
whatever color I have in here. I can swap these…so say I have two different
colors that I want to work with back and forth, if I click on that square it will bring up the Color Palette for the
Color Picker, and from there, I can click and hold
down, I can move this little slider along and click/select specific colors. You’ll
notice down here hexadecimal value… well I can type that in, and say I had
something specific that I wanted, slate (a color) or something, I can type that in. The same is true for all these values. For the most part you probably just use
the color picker slider deal right there. So I have this color
selected, I’m going to say OK (to the dialogue menu). Now if I wanted to match this yellow, I could go up
to it its layer, click inside of it, and it is that yellow. Say I wanted to do the same thing to the Google Chrome logo, and then the background color is the same idea. You click on it, you can select a color. Now, that goes
back to up here we have the Eyedropper Tool. Well, that allows us, no matter what
layer we’re on, to mouseover something and select a specific color.
So I’m going to click, and notice that it changes to that blue. Doesn’t matter where I click, it changes to that color and I can swap
back and forth. Say I want to go back to black and white, click black and white. Very simple. I’m gonna skip over this part, and we’re going to go to the Paintbrush Tool, which works just like a paintbrush. You
can draw. I can select from up here in this status area different kinds of brushes. You can also
download different kinds brushes. I have some pretty sweet brushes (for instance:that one) and some brushes
are more useful than others. Most brushes that you probably use the
most for things are at the top. Some of them can be kinda cheesy, like the Leaf brush. Do we need to put leaves over things?
Probably not A softer brush is sometimes good for
painting, harder brush you may find useful as well. I
use that quite a bit By the way it’s just Command or Control
Z to Undo and I pretty much have my hand over that because I make mistakes constantly when I’m doing things in Photoshop.