Photoshop Tutorial: How to Carve a Face into a Mountain

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Carve a Face into a Mountain

October 8, 2019 85 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to carve a face into a mountain. I provided this photo of a mountain that you download, so you can follow along. Its link is located in the video description
or project files. Open a photo of a face that you’d like to use. Choose one that’s lit mainly
from one side, so it casts shadows on the face. To automatically adjust it’s Brightness
and Contrast, you could either press Ctrl or Cmd + Shift + L to invoke “Auto Tone” or
press Ctrl + Alt + L on Windows or Cmd + Option + L on a Mac to invoke “Auto Levels”. Try
both to see which one looks best to you. Remember, to undo your last step, press Ctrl or Cmd
+ Z. If your photo is in color, press Ctrl or Cmd + Shift + U to desaturate it. We need
to make a selection around the face, so we can use it to cut it out from its background.
There are many ways to make selections, but for this example, I’ll use the Magnetic Lasso Tool. I generally like to use a relatively low Width, low Contrast and high Frequency. The Width is the size of the area that Photoshop looks at to find edges. The Contrast amount
determines how much of a difference there must be in color or brightness value between
the subject and its background for Photoshop to consider something is an edge. The Frequency
is the amount of anchor points Photoshop lays down along the edge. Start anywhere on the
face and carefully drag your Tool over the edge. The hair edges don’t have to be perfect. If anchor points get added in the wrong spot, press the Delete key to remove them and then continue along the edge. When you reach the first anchor point, you’ll see a small ring.
If your left-click on your mouse or pen, it’ll close the path and instantly make the path
into a selection. Press Ctrl or Cmd +J to cut the face from its background and copy it to its own layer. To move it into the mountain document, press “v” to open your Move Tool and drag into onto the tab of the mountain. Without releasing your cursor, drag it down onto the image and release. To resize, position and angle it, press Ctrl or Cmd +T to open your Transform Tool. The shadows on this face are pointing in the right direction, however, if the shadows on your subject are pointing in the opposite direction from the shadows on the mountain, go to Edit, Transform and Flip Horizontal. To resize it, go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, press and hold Alt or Option +Shift as you drag it in or out. To reposition it, go to the inside of the Transform and drag it to approximately this area. To angle it, go to a corner and when you see a curved, double-arrow, rotate it to an angle you like. Continue to make adjustments and then, press Enter or Return. Click off the eyeball next to the layer to temporarily hide it and click the thumbnail of the mountain to make it active. We’re to make the mountain into a displacement map to make the face follow the contours of the mountain. To do this, click the icon at the upper, right of the Layers panel and click “Duplicate Layer”. Click “New” and type in “Displacement”. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Displacement maps look best when they’re slightly blurred, so go to Filter, Blur and Gaussian Blur. Blur it 1 pixel and click OK. Go to File and Save As. Save it to your Desktop as a .psd file and click Save. If you see this warning, click OK. Then, close the Displacement file. Make a copy of the Background by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + J. Change its Blend Mode to Soft Light. Drag the copy to the top of the Layers panel
and click off its eyeball to temporarily hide it. Make the face visible and active. Go to Filter, Distort and Displace. Displace it 10 pixels, “Stretch To Fit” and “Repeat Edge
Pixels”. Then, click OK. Click the Displacement file and click “Open”. The face is now wrapping
itself around the contours of the mountain based on its luminance values. Make a copy
of the face. Hide the copy and make the original active. Change its Blend Mode to “Overlay”
and reduce its opacity to 40%. Make the face copy visible and active. Change its blend mode to “Multiply” and double-click its thumbnail to open its Layer Style window. Click “Color Overlay”. Click the color box and type in 3C361D. Then, click OK. Change the Blend Mode to “Color Dodge”. Click “Drop Shadow”. Make the Distance 90 to 95 pixels. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!