Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Retro, Sci-Fi, Hologram

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Retro, Sci-Fi, Hologram

August 30, 2019 56 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to create the look of a retro, sci-fi hologram. This is an updated
version of the one I did on an earlier version of Photoshop. I provided this image for you
to download, so you can follow along. Its link is located in the video description or
project files. Open a photo you’d like make into a hologram. I downloaded this one from
Shutterstock.com. The first step is to cut out your subject from its background. To do
this, we need to make a selection around your subject. For this example, I’ll use the Quick
Selection Tool. I’ll make the size is 4 pixels. If you have a large area to select, you may
want to increase the size, so you don’t need to drag as much, however, selecting smaller
areas requires a smaller cursor. Dragging your tool over the inside of your subject, automatically makes a selection along the edges. To add a selection to inside areas,
hold down Alt or Option and drag your tool inside those areas. Then, release. If you
missed a spot, just go back and carefully drag your tool over it. Press Ctrl + J on
Windows or Cmd + J on a Mac to cut the subject from its background and copy it to its own
layer. To move it onto the hologram background, press “v” to open your Move Tool and drag
your subject onto the tab of the hologram background. Without releasing your cursor,
drag it down onto your image and release. To resize it, open your Transform Tool by
pressing Ctrl or Cmd + T. Go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, hold
down Shift + Alt on Windows or Shift + Option on a Mac as you drag in or out. To reposition
it, just place your cursor inside the Transform and drag your subject. Continue until you’re
happy with its size and position. Then, press Enter or Return. Make 2 copies of it by pressing
Ctrl or Cmd + J, twice. Name the top layer, “glow”, the layer under it, “blur edges” and the original layer, “motion blur”. Click off the eyeballs of the top two layers to hide them and change the Blend Mode of the active layer… to “Linear Light”. Go to Filter, Blur and Motion Blur. Make the Angle: 0 degrees and make the Distance an amount that looks
similar to mine. For the size of this image, I’ll make the Distance: 40 pixels. The larger
your subject is on your document, the greater the Distance should be. Once you type it in,
click OK or press Enter or Return. Hide the “motion blur” layer and make the “blur edges” layer visible and active. Change its Blend Mode to “Luminosity”. Ctrl-click or Cmd -click on the thumbnail to make a selection of the subject’s shape. Go to Select, Modify and
Contract. I’ll contract it by 10 pixels. Again, if your subject is larger than this example,
you may want to type in a greater amount. Go back to Select, Modify and Feather. Feather
it 10 pixels. Invert the selection by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + Shift + I. Go to Filter, Blur
and Gaussian Blur. Blur it: 3 pixels. To deselect it, press Ctrl or Cmd + D. Hide “blur edges” and make the “glow” layer visible and active. Reduce the Fill to 0%. This makes the subject
invisible, but it any effects that we add to it will be visible. Double-click on the
“glow” layer to open its Layer Style window. Click “Outer Glow” and the color box. Pick
white and click OK. Change the Blend Mode to “Color Dodge”. Reduce its Opacity to 30%
and make its Size: 50 pixels. Click “Inner Glow” and the color box. Again, pick white and as before, change the Blend Mode to “Color Dodge”. Reduce its Opacity to 30% and I’ll
make its Size: 250 pixels. Make all the layers visible. Next, we’ll create the scan lines. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. We’ll fill it with 50% gray. The easiest way
to do this is to press Shift + F5 key at the top of your keyboard to open the Fill window.
Choose: 50% Gray. Then, click OK. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the Sketch folder and click Halftone Pattern. Make the Pattern Type: Line, Size: 1 and the Contrast is 40. Then,
click OK. We need to double the amount of lines to approximate the look of scan lines.
To do this, open your Transform Tool. The Width and the Height of the Transform are both 100%, so go to the Height and type in 50%. Then, press Enter or Return. Go to View and
make sure “Snap” is checked. If it isn’t, just click on it. Open your Move Tool, place
your cursor on the lines and hold down Shift as you drag it down until it snaps it place.
Holding Shift as you move it, keeps it aligned. Make a copy of the layer, hold down Shift
again and drag the copy to the top until it snaps in place. Merge the 2 layers by pressing
Ctrl or Cmd + E. panel. Open your Channels panel. If you don’t see it, go to Window and Channels.
At the bottom of the Channels panel, click the small, circular icon to make a selection
of your image. Open back up the Layers panel. Now that we have a selection of the scan lines,
we can trash this layer, since we don’t’ need it anymore. Make the “motion blur” layer active
and click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection next to it. Place your cursor on the layer mask and hold down Alt or Option as you drag a copy of it next to
the “blur edges” layer. To get the result we want, we need to invert one of the layer masks. To do this, press Ctrl or Cmd + I. Lastly, we’ll color cast our hologram with cooler tones. First, group the hologram layers into a folder by Shift-clicking on the top layer
to highlight all the hologram layers and then, press Ctrl or Cmd + G. Click the Adjustment
layer icon and choose “Photo Filter”. Click this icon to clip the adjustment layer to the one layer beneath it in the Layers panel. All the contents in the folder will have its
color cast adjusted, but not the background. Open the list of photo filters and click Blue. To increase the intensity of the blue color cast, increase its Density. I’ll increase
it to 50%. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!