Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Bi-Directional, Optical Illusion, Photo Portrait

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Bi-Directional, Optical Illusion, Photo Portrait

August 21, 2019 83 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to create a surreal, trippy, multi-directional portrait from a
face photographed in profile and the same face photographed facing forward. For illustration purposes, I provided this face facing forward and in profile, so you can follow along. Because
they’re not for redistribution, I embedded watermarks on them, but you can apply the
techniques that I’ll be showing you to your own photos. The first step is to make a selection
around your subject, so we can isolate the face from the background. There are many to
make selections, but for this example, I’ll use the Quick Selection Tool. I’ll use a size
of 9 pixels and drag over the subject until her face is completely selected. At the top, click the Refine Edge button or you can go to Select and Refine Edge. I did an in-depth
tutorial on Refine Edge, so to save time, I won’t be going over all the details here. Check “Smart Radius” and increase the Radius a little. Brush over the hair and output it as a New Layer with Layer Mask. Then, click OK. Notice, in the Layers panel, you now have
a new layer with a layer mask of the selection next to it. Open the file of the subject facing
forward. Make a selection around the subject, refine its edge and brush over the hair. This time, save it as a “New Layer”. Make the bottom layer visible and active. We’ll fill it with
white. First, make sure your foreground and background colors are black and white, respectively.
If they aren’t press “D” on your keyboard. Since the background color is white, press
Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. Open back up your subject’s profile. We need to place it into the “face
forward” document. Press “v” to open your Move Tool and drag the image onto
the profile’s tab. Without releasing your mouse or pen, press and hold Shift as you
drag it down on the image and release. Pressing Shift kept this document centered. Drag the
top layer below the middle layer and drag the layer mask next to the middle layer. Temporarily hide the top layer by clicking off the eyeball next to it. Click off the chain link between
the middle layer and the layer mask. This will allow us to move and resize the layer
and/or the layer mask independently of each other. Click the layer to make it active.
To resize and position the face, so the lips are synced up with the lips of the profile,
open your Transform Tool by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + T. First, go inside the Transform
and drag your image, so the lips are aligned with the lips on the profile. To enlarge the
face, go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, press and hold Shift as you
drag the corner out. When the face is sized and aligned to its profile counterpart, press
Enter or Return. Next, we’ll replace the face forward nose with nose from the profile. If you look at it long enough, this creates a mind-bending, optical illusion that melds two different perspectives of the same face. Make the profile visible and active. Click the Layer mask icon
to make a layer mask next to the profile. Invert the layer mask by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + I. Invert your foreground and background colors by pressing “x” on your keyboard. Open your Brush Tool and open your Brush picker. I’ll make the size of 90 pixels. The Hardness
is 0% and the Opacity and Flow are both 100%. Brush over the area to reveal the profile nose. To mask out areas, press “x” to place black on your brush and before you start brushing
again, make your brush smaller by pressing the left bracket key on your keyboard. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!