Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Warhol-style, Pop Art Portrait from a Photo!

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Warhol-style, Pop Art Portrait from a Photo!

August 7, 2019 85 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. I’m going to show you how to create an Andy Warhol-style, pop art image from a photo! It can be black and white or color. This is an update of a tutorial I did quite awhile ago on an earlier version of Photoshop. The techniques in this tutorial are quicker and more flexible. Open a photo you’d like to use for this project. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock.com.
The first step is to convert it into a Smart Object, so we can modify it non-destructively
and even replace it without having to redo all the effects that we ‘ll be adding to it.
To do this, click the icon at the upper, right of the Layers panel and click “Convert to Smart Object”. If you want to crop your image, open your Rectangular Marquee Tool and drag it over the area of your image you want to keep. Go to Image and “Crop”. Deselect it by pressing Ctrl + D on Windows or Cmd + D on a Mac. Next, we’ll resize the image to
give us the best results from the filters we’ll be using. Go to Image and Image Size.
If the resolution isn’t 72 pixels per inch, highlight it and type it in. The Width
and Height will automatically change to different amounts in order to retain its shape. For
the Height, type in 870 and click OK. To fit it back onto your canvas, press Ctrl or Cmd
+ 0 or to see it at 100%, press Ctrl or Cmd + 1. Next, we’ll make a selection around your
subject to separate it from its background. There are many ways to make selections and
your choice should depend on the characteristics of your image. For this example, I’ll use
the “Quick Selection Tool”. If you’re using this tool as well, make its size approximately
10 pixels. Drag the tool over your subject. To refine the edge of your selection, click
the “Refine Edge” button or go to “Select” and “Refine Edge”. I did an in-depth tutorial
on Refine Edge, so if you’d like to watch it, I provided its link in my video’s description
or project files. Drag the Radius to the right and check “Smart Radius”. Drag your tool over
the edge of the hair and output it as a “Layer Mask”. Then. click OK. Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on the New Layer icon to make a new layer below the active layer. We’ll fill the empty
layer with white, but first, make sure your foreground and background colors are black
and white, respectively. If they aren’t, press “D” on your keyboard. Since white is your
background color, press Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. If your subject is in color, desaturate it
by clicking on its thumbnail to make it active and click the Adjustment layer icon. Click,
“Black White”. We’ll convert your image into a Smart Object, so we can add filters to it.
To do this, Shift-click on the bottom layer to highlight all the layers and, as before,
click the icon at the upper-right and click “Convert to Smart Object”. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the “Sketch” folder and click, “Halftone Pattern”. For the Pattern Type, choose “Dot”. Make the Size: 2 and the Contrast: 0. Then, click OK. Go back to Filter, Sharpen and “Smart Sharpen”. Make the Amount: 500%, the Radius: 64 pixels and the Noise: 0%. Keep in mind, since your applying the filter to a Smart Object, you can adjust the
filter’s settings later at any time. Click OK or press Enter or Return. Click the Adjustment Layer icon and click “Levels”. Make the Input white level: 100 to brighten your image. Make your subject active and change its Blend Mode to “Linear Burn”. Ctrl-click or Cmd-click
on the New Layer icon to make a new layer below the active layer. In this empty layer,
we’ll add colors to our subject. Click the foreground color to open the Color Picker.
Pick a color for your background and click OK. To fill the empty layer with that color,
press Alt or Option + Delete. Presently the Levels adjustment layer is brightening your
entire image including the blue background we just added. To restrict the adjustment
layer to effect just your subject and not the background under it. Scroll to the top
of the Layers panel and make the Levels adjustment layer active. Click this icon to clip it to
the one layer beneath it. Another way to clip it is to press Ctrl + Alt + G on Windows or Option + Cmd + G on a Mac. Scroll to the bottom and make the color background active. Click the foreground color again and this time, pick a color for your subject’s skin. Then,
click OK. Open your Pencil Tool and Pencil Picker. We’ll take care of the size in a moment.
Make sure the Hardness and Opacity are both 100%. Then, press Enter or Return. To make
your pencil bigger or smaller, press the right or left Bracket key on your keyboard. Now,
draw over the skin. Don’t be concerned if it’s not perfect. Click your foreground color and pick a color for the hair. Brush over the hair and feel free to use the color
for other areas of your subject. Continue to draw different colors over areas of your subject and to brush in soft, feathered colors, use your Brush Tool with a Hardness of 0. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!