Photoshop Tutorial: How to Quickly Create Awesome, Photographic, Double-Exposure Portraits

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Quickly Create Awesome, Photographic, Double-Exposure Portraits

August 20, 2019 100 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to quickly create a stunning, photographic, double-exposure portrait. Open a photo of someone that you’d like to use for this project. If you want to crop
your photo, open your Rectangular Marquee Tool and drag it over your subject. Go to Image and Crop. To deselect it, press Ctrl or Cmd + D. To fit your photo back onto the
canvas, press Ctrl or Cmd + 0. Next we’ll create a selection around your subject in
order to separate it from its background. There are many ways to do this and I covered
them in many of my tutorials. Since this photo has a white background, I’ll use the Magic
Wand Tool. If you’re using this tool as well, check “Contiguous” and make its “Tolerance”
approximately 30. Click on a white area outside your subject to make a selection of that area.
Go to another white area and Shift-click on it to add that selection, as well. To check
your selection, press “Q” to see it as a Quick Mask. It you’re happy with it, press “Q” again
to revert it back into a selection. Then, invert the selection by pressing Ctrl or Cmd
+ Shift + I. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection. Ctrl-click
or Cmd-click on the New Layer icon to make a new layer below the active layer. We’ll
fill the empty layer with white, but first, if your foreground and background colors aren’t
black and white respectively, press “D” on your keyboard. Since white is your background
color, press Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. Click the thumbnail of your subject to make it active
and click the Adjustment Layer icon. Click “Black White”. Open the Preset fly-out list
and click “High Contrast Blue Filter”. Click back on the Adjustment Layer icon and this
time, click Levels. In the Input white field, I’ll type in 142. Drag the Levels adjustment
layer below the Black & White layer. Make the white layer active. Open your other photo
that we’ll use to create the double-exposure. To place it into your subject’s document,
press Ctrl or Cmd + A to select it all and Ctrl or Cmd + C to copy it. Open your other
document and press Ctrl or Cmd + V to paste it in. Drag your subject’s layer mask next
to the other photo. Make your subject active and change its Blend Mode to “Overlay”. If you want to reposition the image inside your subject, click off the chain-link icon. This
unlinks the photo and the layer mask, which allows us to resize and reposition the layer
and the layer mask independently of each other. Make the photo active and open your Transform
Tool by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + T. If your photo is larger that your subject, press Ctrl
or Cmd + 0 to see the Transform’s entire bounding box. To re-position it, go inside the Transform
and drag it. To resize your inside image, go to a corner and when you see a diagonal,
double-arrow, press and hold Shift as you drag the Transform in or out. To accept it,
click the check-mark at the top. Then, fit your document back onto the canvas. If you
want to lighten some dark areas, invert your foreground and background colors by clicking
this icon or by pressing “x” on your keyboard. Open your Dodge Tool and click Shadows for
the Range. The Exposure is 100% and make sure “Protect Tones” is checked. Open the Brush
Picker. We’ll take of the size in a moment. Make the Hardness: 0% and press Enter or Return.
To make your Dodge tool smaller or bigger, press the left or right bracket key on your
keyboard. Brush over dark areas you’d like to lighten. Conversely, if you want to darken
some light areas, invert your colors and open your Burn Tool. This time, click “Midtones”
or “Highlights”. I’ll reduce the exposure to 25% and brush over those areas. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!