Photoshop Tutorial: Part 2 – How to Design & Create a Vintage, Bauhaus Poster (Design #1)

September 21, 2019 0 By Peter Engel


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
This is Part 2 of creating a vintage, Bauhaus poster. Picking up from where we left off,
with the top layer active inside your folder, click the New Layer icon to make a new layer.
Open the “Single Column Marquee Tool” and click on your document where you’d like to
make a vertical line. You can always adjust its location later if you want. Go to Edit
and “Stroke”. Make its Width: 25 pixels and the Location: Center. Then, click OK or press
Enter or Return. To deselect it, press Ctrl or Cmd + D. Click the New Layer icon to make
a new layer. Open your “Single Row Marquee Tool” and click on your document where you’d
like to make a horizontal line. Go back to Edit and “Stroke”. Click OK or press Enter
or Return. Then, deselect it. If you want to add another vertical or horizontal line,
make sure that respective layer is active and make a copy of it. Open your Move Tool
and drag the copy to where you’d like to add it to your poster. Remember: you can always
reposition it later. Let’s collapse the folder for now. Click the Adjustment Layer icon and
click “Solid Color”. In the Brightness field, type in 25% and click OK. Presently, the Solid
Color adjustment layer is affecting all the layers below it in the layers panel. To restrict
it to affect only the one layer below it, which is your folder of black text and lines,
we’ll clip it to the folder by pressing Ctrl + Alt + G on Windows or Cmd + Option + G on
a Mac. Notice, by making all the black elements a dark grey color, we can now see the paper
texture showing through it in concert with the Multiply blend mode. Next, we’ll add a
color frame around the vertical text. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. Open
your Rectangular Marquee Tool and feather it 0 pixels. Drag a selection over the text
leaving room for an inside stroke. Go to Edit and Stroke. Make the Width: 100 pixels and
click the color box. Pick a color you like. I’m using the same color as I used for my
secondary text. Once you pick your color, click OK. Make the Location: Inside. Then,
click OK. Then, deselect it. If you want to reposition it, open your Move Tool and drag
it or you can use your arrow keys for more control. Change the Blend Mode to Multiply
and drag the layer below your folder. Make a new layer. Open your Rectangular Marquee
Tool. If you want to make a perfect square, press and hold the Shift key as you drag the
selection. I’ll fill the selection with the same color that I used for the frame. Since
it’s still my foreground color, I’ll press Alt or Option + Delete. Then, deselect it.
Change the Blend Mode to Multiply. To reposition it, as before, open your Move Tool and either
drag it or use your arrow keys. Next, we’ll add a circular shape in another color. Make
a new layer and open your Elliptical Marquee Tool. To make a perfect circle from the center
of your cursor, press and hold Shift + Alt on Windows or Shift + Option on a Mac as you
drag out the selection and don’t release your mouse or pen, yet. To reposition the selection,
just drag it. Then, release. Click your foreground color and pick a color you like to fill the
circular selection. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. To fill it with the foreground
color, press Alt or Option + Delete. Then, deselect it. Change its Blend Mode to Multiply.
If you want to reposition the circle again, open your Move Tool, uncheck “Auto Select”
and drag it. If your find that it’s sticking a bit when you move it, go to View and if
“Snap” is checked, click it to de-activate it. Now, it won’t stick. Continue these steps
to make other geometric shapes that play with your text. This is Marty from Blue Lightning
TV. Thanks for watching!