Workflow Enhancements | Live from HQ | Inside Unreal

Workflow Enhancements | Live from HQ | Inside Unreal

November 16, 2019 15 By Peter Engel


>>Amanda: Hey everyone! Welcome to this week’s news
and community spotlight. Want to get an early look
at the latest version of UE4? Unreal Engine 4.24 is on the
road to release and preview 1 is now available
for download. Get it today
to check out updates to Pixel Streaming
and ray tracing. Try out the Sky
Atmosphere Component and test the new AutoSDK
and BuildAgent developer tools. Try out beta features such as
the Landscape Blueprint Brushes and the Landmass plugin, updated Material Layers
and the OpenXR plugin. The 4.24 preview 1 forum thread contains a complete list
of updates and we invite you
to share feedback on this and subsequent releases there. Keep in mind that preview builds
are not production ready, so if you’re testing
out the features, we encourage you to use
copies of your projects. Have you grabbed this month’s
free Marketplace content? If not head over there now
to snag this month’s products: a Ballistics FX pack,
interactive lights, a Mesh placement system,
and aquatic environment pieces plus a few construction
and Hollywood set prep packs
that will help add authenticity to your next project have been added to
the permanent collection. Norwegian studio
Rock Pocket Games made the jump
from their successful bright, colorful brawlers
and platform puzzlers to something new. The moody and atmospheric
Lovecraftian and horror game,
Moons of Madness. Watch our spotlight
to hear how the team worked to keep gamers
on the edge of their seats as they step into the space
boots of Shane Newehart, a technician spiraling
into madness on the new frontier of Mars. With multiple projects
across a number of platforms, Force Field Entertainment is a
studio that specializes in VR. Their first UE title, Landfall,
launched on Oculus Rift in 2017 and since then
they’ve gone on to build many
different experiences using Unreal for a wide variety
of VR platforms. The team has kindly
put together a detailed guide on how they optimize
their environments to let key elements
shine up close without compromising
their workflow. Make sure to check it out
if your next project is in VR. Two-Person team
Flight School Studio released their genre-mashing
pinball brawler Creature in the Well
to much deserved high praise. Dive into our interview
with them to find out how they delivered the surprise
hit as a small team including notes on melding
distinct gameplay mechanics and their unique comic
book-inspired aesthetics. And don’t forget that the 2019
Epic MegaJam starts next week and it’s the five-year
jamiversary of UE4 jams. This is your chance to compete
in our biggest jam yet featuring a GDC 2020 grand prize package
from Intel, custom MegaJam branded PCs from Falcon Northwest
and much more. We’ll announce a theme on
the November 14th livestream. Get all the details
and sign up on the official itch.Io MegaJam page. Alright, here are this week’s
top Karma earners. Everynone, DDemon, GEODVS
BlueMind Studio, TRI99er_, Tuerer, unearlywhales, Bojan Novakovic, M.Janssens
and T_Sumisaki. Thank you all so much for
helping out others on AnswerHub. Over to our spotlights. First up is a beautiful
interactive architectural demo created by Fleximage. What you see is all built
by their team and imported into Unreal
via Datasmith. You can download
the application and try it out
for yourself via their website. Here is Guntastic!
Sit on your couch or take
this 16-bit party brawler online to battle in lightning-fast
one-shot, one-kill rounds. Participation is heavily
encouraged because after each round
anyone still live is forcibly eliminated.
Wishlist it now on Steam. And the final piece this week is
Dawn of an Old Age, blending a beautiful
live dance performance with interactive visuals. Projected onto both the dancer
and the wall, the visuals leverage motion
tracking to influence the particles and graphics
onscreen, get additional details and watch their full video
available in our forums. Alright, thank you
so much for tuning in. We’ll see you next week.>>Victor: Hey,
everyone and welcome to the Unreal Engine
livestream. I’m your host, Victor Brodin
and with me today I have Technical Writer,
Tim Hobson.>>Tim: That is correct.
>>Victor: Thanks for being back.>>Tim: Gladly.>>Victor: Always having a
good time when you’re around. Today we’re going to talk about- a bit about
workflow enhancements and sort of a few ways- Some have existed for a while
and some are new in 4.24- of how you can
improve productivity.>>Tim: Absolutely. Yeah. There’s a bunch of settings
that are just kind of like new and experienced users may not know about
that we’ll just kind of->>Victor: Or it’s a little
refresher, right?>>Tim: Yeah, yeah.
It’s a refresher. Absolutely.>>Victor: Cool. Yeah, let’s dive
into the Editor.>>Tim: Oh, okay. I guess I
got to do something, right?>>Victor: Well, I mean I can
sit here and ask you questions about what you had for breakfast
and some other interesting- but I think most of them
are here to watch a little bit
of what we can do in the Editor.>>Tim: Okay. So, I guess the first thing
we’re going to start off is a little bit more
of an intro thing for some newer users. I want to start out
with the project setup and just kind of
like project setting stuff. We’re going to dive in there and then we’re going to
kind of bounce around. But we’re going to kind of focus
on project setup, Editor setup,
some level editing stuff and then we’ll kind of bounce
around a little bit.>>Victor: Yeah,
a little Editor Utility Widget.>>Tim: Yeah. So, the first thing
I’m going to do is go up here to the Edit
and Project Settings and then I’m just going
to dock this up here because we’re going to come back
to it a number of times. But here on the Project Settings
there’s a couple of defaults. So, if you’re a new user or
anything you have things in here where you can actually
set your Project Thumbnail. If it’s something
that you want to do, if you have finalized art
or something that you want to have that icon for when you look at it
in the Epic Launcher. We also have
some description stuff. And then the other one here
that- the Maps & Modes, this is a really useful one. You’ll notice anytime
that you open up the Editor it’s always going to the default
starter map or whatever. So, you can actually set
a Startup Map and you can set
a Game Default Starter Map. So, like whenever
you do standalone games and stuff like that, you can be working on
whatever level it is, but if you want to start
on your main menu for your game you can have it default
to starting with that.>>Victor: That’s good in case
it’s an open world game and probably every time you open
and you start the Editor, you don’t want to have to load
that entire thing because maybe you’re just
iterating on something else. Right?
And that’s when it’s good. Maybe you can just have
a blank map. That’s the Startup Map,
that’s usually what I do.>>Tim: Yeah, exactly. So, I mean there’s, there’s
a couple different workflows, but these are some things
that we tend to start with. Same for Default Game Modes. It’s like once you kind of
get those in place, if you want to move beyond
just our standard default templates stuff that we have. Then let’s jump down here
to the Rendering Settings. I tend to default to disabling
a couple of them for my normal Editor workflow. So, if we come down
to Rendering here and then we scroll down
to the very bottom, we have some Postprocessing
defaults here. One that I tend to disable
when I’m working in the Editor is Auto Exposure. And this is if you ever go from
a bright scene to a dark scene and, or you have
a bright light source and you’re looking at that
and you look away, it takes that second for that,
that history to kind of clear and it’s like
and levels out in the scene. So, I tend to disable this one
typically all the time. One thing you should
know about that is, so that would disable it here
while working in the Editor, but if I were to hit G
and go to Game Mode, that does not disable it there.
So, you would still have those defaults
that are applied for your game while you’re playing or checking
things out in the Editor.>>Victor: Okay.>>Tim: So, it’s not going
to be something that you have
to constantly go back. But it’s a good workflow thing
that I use. And then the other one
I’m going to jump over to is- Let’s see here. We have Editor
or was that Editor Preferences? I’m sorry. If we go to Edit,
Editor Preferences, we have a whole bunch
of other settings here. Oh, actually let me go back
to Project Settings to just kind of clear up
a couple things here as well. So, with Project Settings
we do have these two areas where you can set preferences
and settings. The Project Settings are going
to be for your specific project that you’re working on. So, anything that we change
in here is only going to be
a per project basis whereas when we come over
to Editor Preferences, anything that we set here is
going to be on the Engine level. So, any of these settings here
are going to apply to any of the Editor or any Engine version
that I create and or- sorry, any project
that I create going forward, these Editor Preferences
are going to carry over. So, some of the keyboard
shortcuts that we have for doing the previews
in the scene and stuff like
that are going to carry over.>>Victor: So, if you added
those into the project.>>Tim: Yeah, exactly. So, but the next thing-
so in the Editor Preferences, we have a lot more, since these
are more around the Editor and how you’ll be using it, there’s a lot more
accessibility things in here. Like we understand
that there are people that have colorblindness
kind of things going on or you may just have
a different setup for how you want to
color selections or anything in the levels. So, we have a bunch of settings
in here for our user interface that we can change the-
you know, I’m not going to go through
every single one of these, but there are literally
hundreds of them. But the accessibility ones
are really kind of cool here. So, you can actually switch
to whatever type of color deficiency
that you have. And depending
on the severity of that, you can actually increase
or decrease that. If you’re still having issues where it doesn’t
quite meet your needs, we do also have
the color selections here and then you can also change
some of the other settings around as well
for like the output log and just anything
that does have colors.>>Victor: Yeah>>Tim: Sorry, forgive me
a little bit because I have to go back
and forth between lists because it’s a lot to try
and remember and just not in
a very linear flow. The next one is for Graphs. So, this one’s kind of cool.
It’s like I’ve seen people, like they don’t like
having the graph, the grids behind their Editors
for like Blueprint and Material Editors,
so, disabling that->>Victor: Oh, I’ve never seen this.
>>Tim: Now when I go- and where’s my Blueprints?
There we go. Open Level Blueprint.
You now get that nice clean, if you absolutely
hate grid lines and being able to see them.
The snapping still works. So that’s not gone away
but that’s one thing too. So, I’ll just drag this here because I’m sure I’ll come back
to Blueprints at some point. And you can also adjust the Grid
Snap Size too. Let’s see here. And then let’s just come back
over here to keyboard shortcuts. If you’re, like we do have a lot of keyboard shortcuts
in the Editor and we have them all over
the place for different Editors and different things
that you can do. So, for instance,
like the Blueprint Editor here we have a bunch of console-
not console commands, but hotkeys that you can,
you can use these if you’re not familiar
with any of them. This is somewhere
that you can come and you can actually
look and if, you know, you’re like, I absolutely hate
this one key command. You can actually set
your own right here>>Victor: Or set up a
whole slew of new ones.>>Tim: Yeah, exactly.
Because you’ll notice there’s actually
a lot of ones in here for like Show Floor,
Show Grid, you know. So that thing we just did,
we can actually set up a toggle for that if we want it
while working in Blueprints. But yeah, there’s
a whole lot of options you’ll see throughout here. So, I just encourage everyone
to just kind of dive through and just find
what works for you. So, the next thing
this is another one too, it’s like the save frequency
that comes up. So, it’s under General and then
Loading & Saving right here. We do have an option in here,
so, you’ll get this little TOS pop up in the top-
in the bottom right down here.>>Victor: You should probably
see it in- You just didn’t see.>>Tim: Yeah. So, right now it’s set
to save every ten minutes. And then there’s an interaction
delay of like the 15 seconds and then it gives you
a warning of that 10 seconds where it pops up
and before it’s going to save. You know, if you find that, instead of
just fully disabling this, I do always encourage everyone
to keep the auto save on. You just might want to extend or if you’re a little bit
more paranoid, probably decrease it
a little bit. Because depending
on the number of Assets, how large the level is, number
of changes you made, you may have more to save
so it can take longer. So, it may make sense
not to interrupt your workflow every 10 minutes for this.
This is another one that I like and I’ve used on
a number of occasions. It’s called the Show Frame Rate
& Memory Usage. And I don’t remember
where it was, so->>Victor: We can search for it.>>Tim: But the one thing about
all of this is we have the All Settings; we added this a number
of releases back. But no matter
which one I’m into, it’s like if I type
Show Frame Rate, it’s going to
show up regardless. So, when I enable this one,
I go back to my Editor and I now get the frame rate
up here and the memory usage for this
level that’s actually happening.>>Victor: Okay. So, it is for whatever’s being
rendered inside the viewport?>>Tim: Mm-hmm.
>>Victor: Okay. Trying to dip it?
>>Tim: Yeah, I’m trying dip it, but it’s like maxing out
at like that 120. T sorry- I’m just going to Max FPS.
Yeah.>>Victor: Alright.>>Tim: Okay. So yeah,
we limit it a little bit. It doesn’t help like when you’re
in an optimized scene, for example,
trying to mess with it. But yeah, you can totally
control all that right there. But the memory usage
is a really good one, I think, especially if your driver crashes
or something like that and you can probably try
and keep an eye on something.>>Victor: What I like about it
is that it’s not covering up your, the viewport.>>Tim: Yeah.
So, the other option here that most other people do
is the Show FPS, which you can also enable
with the console command, show. What was it? That just like,
totally forget it.>>Victor: Stat FPS?
>>Tim: Stat FPS. There we go.
Which does the same thing. So yeah, you have these toggles
here in the level viewport so that’s just one way
to keep your viewpoint a little less cluttered
if you’re focused on that. There’s some other console
commands for like stat unit that has some useful information
too for debugging.>>Victor: And the graphs.
>>Tim: Yeah. So, it’s just another little
hidden gem, just kind of away. So Editor Preferences,
we’ll come back here. Another one, this one’s
enabled by default, but in case someone
ever disables it for you, you should probably
know about it. The Use Less CPU
when in Background. So, if I minimize
the Editor yeah, we’ve kept this on enabled
for a long, long time. But it’s an option that
if you’re thinking something’s running in the
background, go ahead and check and make sure this is actually
enabled for your project and it wasn’t
accidentally disabled. And then there’s another TOS
pop-up that happens for enable Editor monitor.>>Victor: I should mention
someone in chat said that they couldn’t find,
Show Frame Rate. Does that exist in older Editor
versions as well?>>Yeah. I’ve used this since
like four dot something, like early on versions.>>Victor: So, it’s not new.
We’re in the preview 1 for 4.24 right now.>>Tim: Yeah.
Show Frame Rate & Memory. Oh yeah, I should point out
where that’s actually located. So, if you come here to General, was is it Performance?
Right here. And then under Editor
Performance you can find the toggle and then there’s a, there’s
a couple of other ones in here. Actually, the next one
we’ll talk about, it’s right here as well. So, the Monitor Editor
Performance. This is something that doesn’t
automatically change your Editor performance
or anything like that, but it gives you, the warning, gives you the option
to scale it down. So, for instance, like you were
talking about the FPS dipping. So, if we’re ever working
in the Editor and we see the FPS
is starting to drop or whatever, the Editor monitors
that and it goes, Hey, you know, it’s like I see, you know,
you’ve got some stuff going on. Do you want to, you know, scale
down the scalability settings so that way everything
renders a lot smoother and you can work in the Editor so you’re not getting
that sluggish frame rate? And if you say yes, what will happen is under
Settings here in the toggle, in the main toolbar
under Scalability, it’ll adjust these between
low, medium, high, epic. And you know, I don’t think
it automatically ever sets cinematic,
but the four here and it’ll automatically switch
between certain ones. So, it’s like you can actually,
like for instance, if I’m working in the Editor
and I was like, I know I don’t really care
about shadows right now. And it’s like,
I know it’s a big cost for me, but it’s like I want to see
some of the other effects that I’ve got, I can actually disable that
or put it on low and then continually work
in the Editor and look at everything else
at a higher quality. I mean, I don’t suspect
that’s most people’s workflow, but it’s an option there
if you want it.>>Victor: Yes.>>Tim: You know what
I completely forgot to grab at my desk? The keep calm and look
for the checkbox.>>Victor: Ohhh.
>>Tim: That is a fail on my part.>>Victor: I mentioned
that last week too.>>Tim: I know, I should’ve
given it to you right then.>>Victor: So, you can
just imagine the- We were supposed
to have a little nice. It sits at your desk, right? Yeah. Keep calm
and look for the checkbox.>>Tim: It has sat there for
Five years now. Eric Ketchum made it for me
because he made it when we were on support.
Yeah.>>Victor: Maybe next time.
>>Tim: Yeah. For next time. Yeah.
Alright. Let’s get out of these menus
a little bit and start looking at
some of the level editing stuff. So, some of the viewport
controls. Actually, I lied, I’m going to go right back
to the Editor Preferences. So, if I come here
to Editor Preferences and then Level Editor
and then I come down here to Viewports,
under Controls here, there’s a lot of options
for however you like to work. So, for instance let’s see here. For you people that like to work
inverted on the Y axis, there you go.
Checkbox, have at it. The invert mouse Y, my wife would love
those kinds of settings like she used to like
an invert type person. Same for mouse sensitivity. Some of these ones
for the Flight Control Cameras are kind of cool if you have
that kind of workflow. Like right now it’s for flying
around in the Editor is like, you right click
on the mouse button and then use the WASD keys
to fly around. If you just don’t want
to have to always press that right mouse button you can
totally just use the WASD keys.>>Victor: I think a game pad
works by default.>>Tim: Game pad does work
by default.>>Victor: Yeah.
Which is really neat.>>Tim: I always have my Xbox One
hooked up, so it’s like, when I do have to fly around
some of the levels, it’s really kind of a quick way
to do it. Let’s see here. Same with
the Foliage Editor Controls. Again, we have some drop-downs
here for placing those and depending on different
people’s types of workflow. Another one here
that’s kind of cool that I recently rediscovered is the Enable Combined,
Translate and Rotate Widgets. So, what that one does
when it’s enabled is, let me find an Asset
and I’ll just drag it in here. So, I drag this- let me
go out of Game View. Oh, do I have no convolution
on that for- Yeah, there we go. So, what you get with this one is you get this nice little
translate and circle option and I can just stay in this, this movement of grabbing
the Translate Widget so I can just move
everything around where I want. But if I now highlight
over the circle that’s here, around part of it anyway. I’m not grabbing it
like I did a second ago. No. Oh, there we go.
The arrow on it. I’m sorry.
I don’t use it very often, but like I said,
I recently rediscovered it, but I can grab that arrow
and I can do quick rotates. So, for your level designers
this can be something where you can drag something
in real quick. Let’s do this guy. Grab the yellow circle
and I can move it where I want and you can see this
all blue arrow right here and then I can just completely
just kind of rotate it and face the direction I want. Again, that one was
the Look and Feel, the Combined Translate
and Rotate Widget. That one’s been in
for a long time. And again,
there’s some other ones for like Arcball Rotate. I think that one is one
we introduced last release. Oh go ahead.>>Victor: They were
wondering if it’s possible to save the Project Settings as default
for all of your projects.>>Tim: You can
export them and then re-import them
for your projects.>>Victor: Okay.
>>Tim: Yeah. So, whenever
you go to Export you can save the INI file for that and then just- now I don’t know
whether I want you to say encrypt,
I don’t do this very often, so.>>Victor: So, it is possible.
>>Tim: Let me try the- yeah, because we have
an export for each one. So, I imagine
that’s the only the ones that you really need
to focus on. So, if you change a lot, like in whatever your project
description or whatever else, I’m just speculating
on some of that because I don’t, like I said,
I don’t really do that. I don’t want
to speculate too much. So, let’s come back here again
for the Look and Feel. There’s a- actually
is it under that one? Actually, yeah, I know
it’s called Background Drop. So, Background Drop Distance
and this one’s located in Level Editor, Viewports,
Look and Feel, and then- so, level Editor,
Viewports, let me clear that and actually navigate to
where it’s at. Look and Feel. Oh yeah, the advanced options.
Background Drop Distance. So right now we have it at like, what this does is
there’s a sphere around where your position
is in the world and when you go to drag,
you may have noticed this, like if you have nothing
for it to land on, it looks like it’s far away
and then wherever you move it, it’s just kind of out
there in the world. Right? So, for instance,
let me come out here. I dragged this sucker in and you can see
he’s like right there, right? Somewhere on the other side
of that, whatever, I guess. It looks like
he snapped too that->>Victor: Sky Sphere or no?>>Tim: Oh that’s, there’s like
some planes that kind of sit around that.
Let me come out here. But there’s a specified distance
set at 768 units that, yeah, because that’s not
snapped to anything. It shouldn’t be. Or is that->>Victor: That’s the Sky Sphere.
Isn’t it?>>Tim: It is.>>Victor: There are more planes.
>>Tim: Yeah, I know. Right? Okay. So here we go. I’m beyond
like anything it can snap to.>>Victor: Okay.
>>Tim: You can see that like right here,
it’s just like, there’s like, it looks like
it’s a little bit closer, but it’s just like
that sphere of 768 units that it’s away from me.
That’s what that edits. So, it’s like if you have
a larger open world and you’re want to drag
something further away potentially or you just
don’t like that at 768 units. You can actually increase this,
decrease it. So, like if I just go down
to 250 I think it’s going to be
slapped right on my face. So, it’s like, again
it’s right there in front of me. So that’s an option as well,
you know, these are just kind of
like hidden little things. Another one, this one I use
actually quite often. Let me get back
to the real world over here.>>Victor: Oh,
there’s a basement.>>Tim: It’s where
Victor’s office is.>>Victor: It might
be dark like that. just because we like it dark.>>Tim: Okay. So yes.
So, if we take cameras here and when you drag them
into the world, you get this whole
Preview Camera and you’ll notice this is really small here or really big depending
on your DPI scale, which has been scaled up
for this, for the stream. But what you can do
is under the Editor Preferences, at Look and Feel again,
we have the Camera Preview Size and I’m just going to
minimize this because it does it in Realtime.>>Victor: You know I love this
because I didn’t know about this feature either.
>>Tim: Oh, you didn’t either.>>Victor: And I’ve disabled it
entirely when I actually could have
just shrunk it down.>>Tim: So, if we come
back down here, now I’m working
in a smaller window. Oh, there we go. That five. So now I can actually, depending
on whatever you want, you know, if you want it smaller
or larger, you can increase that size
because I tend to use it a lot for things like when I’m doing
camera placement or whatever and I don’t always want
to pilot the camera, it’s a real quick way. So, I don’t have to like
squint my eyes, get right up on my monitor
and look at every pixel, you know,
I can actually kind of see something
really quickly this way. And with the new settings
here too, it’s like we also get
some of the, especially
with the Cine Camera you get these
some of the digital presets that are already here, and scaling that up actually
gives me that full view of it instead of it just kind of
shrinking off screen.>>Victor: A nice workflow there,
if you want to be able to sort of quickly see
the camera’s perspective and you make it basically
your entire viewport, you can just use the World
Outliner to De-select it, right?>>Tim: Yep. I’m going to come
back to some selection stuff in a second because,
it’s in my long list of things over here
that we’re going to cover.>>Victor: It is a long list.
Yeah. There’s probably
10 times more to cover.>>Tim: Oh yeah. We can totally
do another stream on this. I won’t, but we can if you ask. Okay, so for the World Outliner
while working here and then we’ll come back
over here now. So, keep things
on level editing. One thing I actually- I knew I could do this
in Content Browser. I’d never tried it
in the World Outliner, but for instance, I can use- if I wanted to search for
a couple of different things, I could type in like fog
and then I can do the pipe and then let’s just say
directional light. And I get both those,
I get anything that has fog in the title
and then I also get the directional light
that I’m looking for.>>Victor: That’s really neat.>>Tim: Because I do find that
in my normal workflow just with setting up
a lot of stuff, it’s like I tend
to want to switch back and forth between panels quite often and I use the World Outliner
a lot to search but sometimes I’m constantly
having to go there and type over and over again,
you know, for the same three different
things that I want in the world if I have a long list of like
for a scene like this, there’s a lot of lot of
Static Meshes that I don’t
necessarily care about, but this is a good way
to kind of have some of those. I did open up the documentation
because we do have- I want to show that we do have
an Advanced Search Syntax page and this is all
for the Content Browser as well. So, you can find a lot of things
through the Content Browser. We have examples set up here, the operands
that you should use. And you can search
not just by name, you can search by Asset type
and things like that. So, you don’t have to use
just filters. You can actually scale it down
a lot more, be more granular and a lot of the settings
that are contained. Like if you ever hover
over a Static Mesh, I’ll show you real quick.
I had to re-enable something because for these streams
I do, Slate Enable Tooltips. I disabled those because
what we get otherwise is, we get a lot of this information and just have popups
that are constantly happening. But you can start searching
some of this stuff using those operands. So, it does give you more,
like if you wanted to see what polycounts are
and stuff like that, you can actually get
that granular with it and find those Assets that are really high-poly
or something like that. So yeah, there’s really
kind of cool stuff that that Jamie Dale added.>>Victor: Thanks Jamie.
>>Tim: Yes. So really, really kind of nice. And then I’m just going
to disable that again. If you don’t like the tooltip
stuff popping up all the time or if you’re working
in Content Browser, that’s another thing too. So, this was not
what I intended to show, but it’s a
slate.EnableTooltips 0. So again,
part of my normal workflow just because I’m typically
grabbing a lot of screenshots for documentation
and things like that, so I don’t necessarily need
to worry about a tooltip showing up in there, especially when I start moving
the mouse and hover over things.>>Victor: Tim knows everything.
He doesn’t need tooltips.>>Tim: No, I do,
I absolutely do.>>Victor: I find
them useful to see the native parent class
of the object.>>Tim: Yes.>>Victor: That’s what I like
to use them for.>>Tim: Okay, so the next thing
let’s run through a couple of- I think the scene actually
works kind of well for us. We got some translucent objects. So, there’s a couple of key
commands that you can use while you’re editing as well.
So, one that I use often too is like I don’t always want
to have to go into you know, Play in Editor or PIE using-
so we have over here with play. You know, I don’t want
to necessarily have to simulate the scene or you know, or PIE to get
that game look for something because it’s typically
going to go back to where my player start is and it’s going to
reset some things. So, hitting the G key switches
over to Game View. I talked about this a little bit
earlier when we were talking about disabling some
of those Post Process things. But what Game View does is it, it gives me essentially the look
of the game or the viewport as if I’m playing
the game in the Editor. So, it won’t start
any Blueprint interactions or anything like that, but it gives me that,
that final like rendered look. So, it’s a really clean way
for me to kind of work with things without having
to jump around a lot. The one thing there too
if you like using that workflow is when we go to Show and then under some of
the Show flags here, those Post Process settings
that I was talking about disabling
in the Project Settings for just
your normal Editor workflow. These are not reset here. So, if I set them here
while I’m in Game View, like for instance, let’s just say
I don’t care about Bloom, Depth of Field is not going
to do anything on here. Want something that is very-
like Tonemapper. There we go. Disable them because
that’s a definitive look. Like when I switched back, you’ll see those things
kind of turn back on. I’ve got the Bloom again and that
Tonemapper is turned back on. So, if I toggle between the two, they’re going to be separate
in that sense. So, I can come back and I can
toggle those back on again. But again, you know, like this
is typically what I do for while working with eye adaptation
like disabled in the Editor. When I switched the Game View,
it gives me that final look. You know, it’s like
we have some things like when we’re working more
physically based, like, and more physically
accurate values for lighting. The Auto Exposure
becomes very important for some of those. Let’s see here. Another one is the T key.
T as in Tim. So, I have here,
well this project here has, you know, I did not make it. We have these fog planes here
that are, you know, it’s like,
let’s just say I’m trying to select
something in the background and I keep selecting
these translucent fog planes. I’m tired of selecting these. I want to select
right through them because I could see
through them, if you hit the T key,
we’re going to toggle and it’ll go to whatever- It will not select
translucent objects. So that’s a good quick way
to kind of toggle translucency.>>Victor: Does that include
something that’s masked as well?>>Tim: I didn’t try it. I typically have more trouble
with fog planes.>>Victor: Yeah. Usually->>Tim: I don’t think it would be
a masked object.>>Victor: Okay.>>Tim: But I’ve not tried
like clicking it. Like I don’t know
how much of like a masked area. You know what we could try,
I think the trees are- well it’s got multiple Materials
and yeah, I don’t know. You know what,
let’s just do it real quick.>>Victor: Figure this out? I mean, additive Materials
are pretty quick and then we can have
a definitive answer.>>Tim: I don’t think that floor
has any collision because I think
I accidentally deleted it because everything
keeps going through it. And I’m like why? That is
one thing to kind of note too. If your floor doesn’t have
any collision, you know, then we show going off
to that far distance for snapping to things.
If it doesn’t have collision, it doesn’t know
where it can hit. And that’s going to be the next
key thing I show in a second.>>Victor: Is there
a quick way to see if the T button toggle
is currently active?>>Tim: Active?
>>Victor: I don’t think so. Oh, if you have->>Tim: I don’t know
everything, people.>>Victor: No, we’ll ask
questions and we’ll talk about it and then we can try
to figure it out. They wonder
if there’s a way to see if selecting translucent
objects are active, I think I usually just keep->>Tim: What do you
mean by active?>>Victor: If it’s possible
to click through them or if you can actually
select them in the viewport.>>Tim: Ah, yeah, I’m not sure.>>Victor: I think I usually
just keep clicking T until I can select what I want.>>Tim: Usually my workflow is like,
if I am working in the scene and I’m trying to select
something translucent and I can’t, that’s just,
I don’t even think about it now, I just hit the T key
and then just up, there we go. That’s just become
part of my thing. It’s like, I’m not sure to see
if it shows a toggled state. Materials. I know there’s the masked
Material thing in here, right?>>Victor: Are they in
the starter content or in the Blueprints
project Assets. Because I don’t think that tree
Is part of->>Tim: I thought there was like
the prop bush kind of thing. which actually, yeah, it’s right
there. That’s a masked Material. So, T, I can select that. I can select that. T off, I can select through that
and I can select that. So masked Material does not
toggle the translucency.>>Victor: Alight.
>>Tim: There we go. Figured it out. There you go.
That’s- Real-time thinking
right there, right?>>Victor: Yeah.>>Tim: Okay. Another key that’s
really kind of useful for your level editors
and just people placing things. So, when you drag something
into the level hit the end key on your keyboard and it’ll find the next surface
down under it as long as it has collision. So, I think this floor over here
does not have collision. And for that copy real quick,
I just did a- I held alt and then drag. And so, put that above surface
hit end and it went bye bye down
to the next surface, somewhere in the depths
of that basement. Now one thing to note there is if it doesn’t have
any collidable surface below it, it won’t move at all. It’ll just stay
in that one spot, but it’s just going to go down to the next surface
that it finds.>>Victor: Or I think if it’s already
overlapping with something.>>Tim: Right. So yeah, if it’s
overlapping with something, that’s not going to go anywhere
because it essentially has, it’s in some kind of collision
at that point. So, like there, end,
and nothing’s happened. Spacebar is another
one I like too. And actually,
I’m going to come back over here because I want to make sure that
I don’t keep this thing enabled. I like it,
but just for the stream, it’s throwing me off
a little bit right now. I disabled that combined
Rotate Widget and Translate. So now we’re back
in our normal stuff and one way to quickly toggle between our translate
our rotate and our scale is hitting the space bar. So, you can just quickly
just toggle those And then you can also up here
we have the world space versus object space.
So that can be helpful. Like, if I want to move
an object in a certain way, I’m using object space right now
and the translate widget, I can move the direction
that the Z is for that one. Versus if I go back to world
space that Z is always up. So just other kind of quick
little things. And I’m going to do this one
with a Cine Camera because piloting Actors
is not something I use it for very often.
But let’s find us a camera. Actually, you know what I’m not
even going to use, I’m
not even going to drag it in. I’m just going to do this really
awesome thing right here for the dropdown. We have the Create Camera Here
and I just want to thank Austin, when he added
the Cine Camera here, because that made life
much easier for me because I think I was the one that they’d have to fill
documentation at the time. And I was constantly trying to
create cameras for these shots and I’d always have to drag
in that in place of one of
the other cameras and then replace them. So, one of the things is,
let me get out of Game View here and I go back
and I can see my camera. I’ve got it lined up
for wherever I want, right? And I’m just going to reset
the rotations and stuff too. This is the Arcball thing
that I enabled earlier. I didn’t actually show it. You can grab
the little light sphere that you can see here and you can do just
kind of like free rotate thing, I’m probably
making it look really- So, rotate that around. But then I can come over here
and I can go to perspective. And then what you’ll see is
I’ve got my cameras here. I can choose whatever camera
I want to pilot and then when it goes
into this pilot mode I can just free fly
that around the world and get it placed
wherever I want. So, this is how I create
a lot of the shots that I do for any of my
rendering documentation is I’ll usually pilot the camera, get a really
nice shot that I want, adjust some of the settings.
That’s the beauty of it too, is over here
in the Details Panel. It gives me all the settings
while I’m in this mode. I mean, obviously I can select
other things in the viewport while I’m piloting as well
and have those. But it enables me
to be able to work this way. And then if I want to,
if I’m done with piloting and let’s just say
I’m not done with piloting that, but it’s like, I just don’t want
to see that perspective. What I can do is I can eject, Oh, I didn’t eject,
I just disabled. The, the option here
for the Camera View versus the Game View. This is what I was getting at
with the settings. So, if I go and adjust
my settings, let’s see here. Let’s just- not that camera,
that camera. You can see that I can adjust
the settings here and I’m changing the
focal length on this right now. I think.
I can’t see what that one is. Yeah. Focal length.
And then if I disable, it gets rid of
that cinematic view. Well that part didn’t change but the depth
of field stuff would, yeah. So, it would
show the Game View versus the Editor View.
I can also eject, keep that camera there
where it’s at. The ejection process allows me
to get out of that camera, it stays there wherever it is. And it’s kind of
in that position until I choose to move it again.
If I want to go back and, and use the placed cameras,
I can go back to that. That piloting mode, you can
do this with any Actor as well. So, the cameras automatically
show up here in our placed cameras so that way we can,
you can jump to them. If I want to pilot an Actor, let me find a sphere,
right click, then where is it?>>Victor: It might actually be
further up in the menu there.>>Tim: Yeah, I think it’s- Ah, this is the thing
you ran into, yeah. It’s off the screen.
I can’t see it.>>Victor: The option is there.
There’s pilot, right?>>Tim: Yeah. Because this
means you should be higher. Yeah, it’s just pilot. So, it’d be the this
same kind of thing and then you would have
the camera perspective. So whenever you-
because I can’t do it right now, I’m just going to tell you,
but whenever you do it, for instance
like the sphere here, I would be inside the object, so there’s not the two sided
of Material on this, so I’ll be able to see through,
but let’s just say if it was a two sided Material
or if I’m going to pilot that tree over there
and just like, I want to be able
to plant more trees around or whatever I’m going to have
all that geometry in my way. So, was it hitting the G key
should disable that so you can just see the view of the world
while you’re piloting. Because I can’t do this,
that’s going to frustrate me, but that should be all you
need to do to make that. Let’s see here. Let’s go back
to some of the other ones. Another one too. Let’s look
at some of the other view modes. So, if we come to perspective,
we have some of our top view modes
and our different views. It’s like,
let me go to the top here and any of our
orthographic views, we can do a middle mouse button
and drag and you can do a quick measure
to see in units. So UE4 defaults to centimeters
or 10 centimeters per snap of a unit kind of thing.
And that’s what we’ve got here. So, you can drag that out
and kind of see what distances are between different things If you need.
I’m sorry, I might have to start going
through these a little quicker. I am slow today.>>Victor: Technically we have
another 45 minutes, but a couple of questions. We’ve been on like
for 45 minutes.>>Tim: Oh, has it been that long?
Okay, so quickly, another one here that we have
is in these text boxes. Let’s just say for scale
we can do like, you can actually do your,
your math operands. So, multiplication,
division, all that. So, if I just go like five-
where’s my plus button? that’s five.
And then we get 10 for whatever the scale
of that object is on that. That’s one thing that’s like,
I don’t think a lot of people always,
I always forget about it. I’m always like whipping out
calculators and stuff and it’s like
I can just sit here and use these text boxes. Last one I’m going to show
for the level editing here is, let me get back
to my perspective. And this is a workflow
that I use very often and I use
multiple Details Panels. So up here on our Windows, we actually have
a bunch of different options for different panels
that are maybe closed. The ones with check boxes
beside them are already opened. The one for Details Panel, you can have up
to four Details Panels, same with Content Browsers. So right down here you can
have up to four of those. So, the difference between or
with these, or not difference, but something that you can do
with them, let me scale this down, is we have these little
lock buttons that are all over the place
for these kinds of panels. So, I’ve seen people ask
it’s like, I’m working on something but I’m constantly having
to select off it and go and try and move around
the world and it’s selecting wherever
the other Actor is. These locked panel buttons
whatever I select. So, let’s just say the tree here
and I lock on it. I can click off it. And then I can keep
the settings here because I think I saw someone
had posted on the forums or on the UE4 Facebook group
that’s community run. They had two details
panels open, but every time they selected, it was selecting that Asset
for both of them. So, this is again one workflow.
Same for the Content Browser. I actually didn’t realize
this one until recently. The Content Browser
has a lock key. So, it’s like
whatever folder I’m in, I can stay in that spot
and work from it.>>Victor: That’s really handy when you’re iterating
between two things, right?>>Tim: Yeah. And I do that very often
in my workflows just for, like right now
it’s like I’m working on the Sky
Atmosphere documentation. So, as I’m working on that, I’m constantly switching
between the Directional Light and changing some settings
and the Sky Atmosphere stuff. So, it’s like, it’s one of those
things that just have those both those panels opened
and I have them locked. That way, I can just keep
both those settings there and it makes things much quicker
for me to turn around and adjust that way. So, let’s see here. Let’s open up
a Material real quick. Lauren gave me a bunch of stuff
to call out on this and she gave me a bunch
of little things to call out because like, man, she does so many quality
of life improvements.>>Victor: She’s joining chat too.
>>Tim: Yeah. So, she’s in chat. She’s participating
in this like, she does so many little quality of life things. And this one is one
that was integrated. Someone from our community,
Coconut Lizard, and I’m going to pull up
his website real quick here too. He’s actually got documentation
on this thing that he had added and it got integrated
into the Engine. So, your features, man, if you make something that’s
really useful for these things that can be broadly used,
submit those pull requests. We call you guys out here
on the stream now and even in the release notes
we put your names at the top for those kinds of things.
So yeah, definitely. Yeah, he’s got some really
kind of cool stuff on here. So, going into it, I think
there’s probably a few things that aren’t-
didn’t get pulled over, but regardless,
it looks kind of cool. So, what this thing does, like when it’s enabled here
in the Material Editor is, let’s just say I select
this Lerp node. I can see the path
of all of that going down and it just kind of grays out
all this other stuff so that way
I can kind of keep myself focused on what that is
without all the other noise. And especially as your Materials
start to grow or even in Blueprints as things start to grow,
it’s kind of the same thing. Over here,
we got the option are enabled. If we just do a branch->>Victor: It looks so strange
without the grid. I’ve never seen that before.>>Tim: It’s throwing you off. It’s like you’re just lost
in deep space or something. So, like right here it’s like
I’ve got these nodes selected and it just shows me the path. So, same kind of operation,
everything. The one difference in the
Material Editor that I noticed was that you can actually lock
that node state as well or you can just focus
on the whole chain. So really another
kind of cool thing. And while we’re here
on the Material Editor, this is another Lauren feature. This one’s got a couple
of parameters in it. As your Material Graph grows, if you have really large
lists of parameters that are kind of
scattered about, instead of having to go
and constantly kind of search and find them, you do get all those parameters
listed over here and the parameter defaults and you can actually
change those there.>>Victor: So that’s all
that have been exposed?>>Tim: Yeah. So, this has been converted
into a parameter. Like if I were to convert this
to a constant, and then apply the changes, it should disappear
from this panel. I say should, did it
or is it somewhere else too?>>Victor: Well, top,
there’s another top there. Maybe it’s new to me, so.>>Tim: Yeah. That’s what
she wanted me to show too is if I take that Material,
she added this one. Let me make Material Instance
out of it, and then I’m going to open up
the Material Instance here and we have those parameters
here for bottom and top. Let’s just say that I changed
this one to not be its default. There is now an option in here for Show Only
Overridden Parameters. And what it’s going to show
is it got rid of all the other parameters
that were listed there and it only shows that one. This is something that I do use
very often as well. Maybe not in the Material
Instance Editor that I use, but we have this
in other editors. So, for instance,
like the Details Panel here, but this eye icon
that you click on, the Show Modified Properties,
I use that one often, especially with
some of my lights, there’s so many
different properties and settings there
that can be changed. When I start
to do troubleshooting or I’m not sure
why something looks incorrect, that’s probably the first thing
that I go to.>>Victor: Okay.>>Tim: Because it just shows me
what’s been changed with that, especially if I’m debugging
whatever scene I’m looking at and trying to figure out why something
is not looking correct.>>Victor: If you screwed it up.>>Tim: I should say
most of the stuff that I’m looking at
is my own projects, where I did it before
and it’s like I’m moving, I was like, okay,
I’ll use this again. It’s just like,
Oh, why is this messed up? Because I don’t work
with other people’s projects. Okay, so let’s see here,
Parameters tab, Material Instance,
showed that one, showed that one.
Alright. So, in this as well, let me
come over to Content Browser, Content Browser has some
more stuff I can show. Okay. So, in the Content
Browser here, the bottom right,
the View Options, I have to tell people
this one occasionally. It’s like I do try and reference
it in docs wherever I can just because
some of those things do come up and it’s like these properties
are just kind of, you may not always see them. So, with all of our plugins
and stuff, like we were starting to rely a little bit more on
like a plugin content. So, for instance,
like with this upcoming release, some people who’ve already
tried it, the Sun and Sky plugin,
it’s a content plugin. So, it’s really cool. Right?
It’s built off- there used to be the one
that I think it’s still there, the Sun Positioner which is,
it’s all under the same plugin, but it, the steps
to enable it was, it was a plugin content, but you would never see
that folder when you enabled the plugin
so we have these options here where you have to come in
to Show Engine Content. And then what this does is add
some Engine content folders below here and it’s just things
that are in the Editor. And then on top of that it’s like
we have the Show Plugin Content and what that gives us
is the different plugins that are enabled. So you can actually start
to grab content from there and see how something’s working. Like Engine Content I tend
to enable when I’m working because
there’s things in the Editor that are in the Engine
that we include by default. Like for instance, like, I may not always have a Skeletal
Mesh in a dummy project that I make
and it’s like we always have that little orange,
the old orange.>>Victor: TTP?
>>Tim: He has a name?>>Victor: TTP character. I mean
that’s what the file name.>>Tim: I thought you called him
Tiki Pete.>>Victor: I think it’s Tutorial
Third-Person_character. Yeah.>>Tim: I know. I swear
I heard Tiki Pete.>>Victor: Okay, Tiki Pete?
Maybe we just named him, although that has no relevance.>>Tim: Yeah, absolutely. Actually, I was like, man,
he’s partying all the time. It’s like train of thought,
totally lost. But yeah, if you wanted
to also work with like your own developer
content folders you can have your own
like content folder that you have for just yourself. where it’s like, you may
be working on something, you don’t want
to necessarily check it into your project fully
at that time.>>Victor: Also, a good thing
to call out that if you modify something, one of the files in Engine
Content, that is by default, it is set to be ignored, right?
So, if you make a change->>Tim: Yeah, it gives you some
pretty hefty warning like, hey, you’re affecting
more things because this is, you may be changing it in
what you think is your project, but that is actually going back to the Engine root folder
and changing that.>>Victor: What I usually
do is I make a folder, it’s called Engine Content Copy
and if there’s anything that I want to use
from the Engine Content, I will copy it and move it over
to my folder on the project.>>Tim: You know what I do?
I grab this right here and I just drag it
from the modes panel directly in without having to go through
that whole thing.>>Victor: I do like to know which
folder I’ve copied content from because I usually want
to exclude that from my package builds. I generally don’t tend
to do that.>>Tim: Usually these dummy
objects are all I’m working with when I’m just doing
a little test stuff. So yeah, but, the ones
for our basic Assets, that was one thing,
once I discovered that I didn’t have to go
sifting through folders, I can just do that move,
copy, whatever.>>Victor: Nice.
>>Tim: Don’t do the move. I think you get like nasty words
like validation failed, whatever.
It’s like, Nope.>>Victor: Yeah.
Because some of that stuff is required for the Editor. I mean you’re going to find
all the Editor Textures and everything else in there. If you’ve ever packaged
for Android you can see
all the Textures coming>>While we’re here
in the Content Browser. Let me disable some of this so I can get rid
of the clutter again. The Show Favorites. So, if you have a larger project
or even just a project that’s like this one,
not super large or whatever, but let’s just say
you want to mark some Assets and mark some folders favorite. What you can do
is click Add To Favorites and under
your Favorites option here. So again, View Options,
we can go to Show Favorites, right click on whatever
the folder is or the Assets. Victor, I think you jinxed me
because my right click menu is->>Victor: What did I do?
>>Tim: -is all not working. Yeah, my right click menu
is not working. Oh, for the Assets. But anyways, right click, Remove
From Favorites, if it’s one
that you have in there. Another one we can
do in here too; I’ve used this in the past
for projects that I’ve had just because
I’m totally a color person. I like being able to set a color
for a folder because I can
quickly reference it. This is how I do
Photoshop files. Yeah, so go to set color and then you can use
from existing colors or quickly create
your own new ones. So, for another filter thing
that we do have, so we’ve got
the Filter Options up here. I think we’ve opened up
several different Assets and we get down
to other filters down here. And this is another one
that Lauren added recently, the Recently Opened. And then if I go back up
to my- Now that is going
to be per folder, I think, that it’s going to
remember what Assets I did open. But if I come back up here
to my general Content Browser or content folder
that’s going to show every folder
and hierarchy under it. You can see that these are the
several Assets that I did open. By default, there’s like
20 that it remembers, but you can change that
in the Editor Preferences. Let’s see here.
What was that called? Number of Assets?
Yeah. So, Content Browser
and then Content Editors, Content Browser,
and then Number of Assets to Keep in Memory Filter
or Recently Filtered. You can change that to a larger
number or a lower number.>>Victor: So that’s a possibility
to have more of a favorite toggle almost, right?
Because you’re iterating on maybe five to six
different Assets. Yeah, that’s really nice.
So, there are plenty of other useful features
like Show Redirectors. One of the filters I like
is Show Redirectors.>>Tim: Oh. Is that one?
>>Victor: Yes.>>Tim: Okay. Look at all
the filters here, man.>>Victor: Yeah.>>Tim: Is it under the->>Victor: I believe other-
miscellaneous. Actually, yes. It’s in there.>>Tim: Yeah. I’ll have to look
at that cause that’s->>Victor: Redirector.>>Tim: Speaking of redirectors,
let’s do this real quick. Oh man. You killed my, yeah.
Let me try closing that and let’s see if reopening
it gives it back to me. I was going to share the
reference for your real quick. I’ve totally lost
my right mouse button. What is up with that?>>Victor: I wonder,
I don’t think it’s a battery issue
with the mouse. Might want to
restart the Editor.>>Tim: You can,
>>Victor: We’ve got time.>>Tim: Alright.>>Victor: I’d rather it works
for you. We are on preview 1.>>Tim: Yeah,
that is true because, and then I need
to wrap up real quick so you can show
your really cool column.>>Victor: That’ll be quick.
>>Tim: I know it’d be quick but->>Victor: I can show that anytime,
Tim. I’m here every week. Alright, well we do have
quite a few questions as well. Someone was wondering
how to change the UI scale size and keep it after restart, even on 4K display
everything is huge.>>Tim: I’m not sure
on the 4K display because
I don’t have 4K monitors.>>Victor: Okay. I do,
but I never adjust anything while I’m working with them. I guess it depends on the size
of your actual monitor.>>Tim: I think I’m
one of the few people that opted not to go
with the 4K monitors. I like my 2K and I was just,
I was like, yeah, I don’t need
to change my workflow.>>Victor: Don’t take away my 2K!
>>Tim: Okay. So, let me see
if I get my Content Browser. Bring it back up. Hey, there we go.
We got it back. Okay, so if we go here
and Asset Actions, I believe it was no,
oh, Reference Viewer. It’s right here
in the main thing. Depending on your Assets
and how large your project is, even for small ones or whatever. If we open up
the Reference Viewer here, the Material that I’ve opened,
what this shows is anything where it’s actually
being used elsewhere. And it’s all in a hierarchy
kind of structure too. So, it’s like if I start- so this is the Asset here
in the middle that I’ve got. I can actually go
and click back through and I can keep working
my way back to see where it is being referenced. So that Material Instance
went to a Material. That Material is here that
is assigned to this Static Mesh that is in this level. But this is probably
a very simple one just because it’s not
a giant world where you’re using a lot of
Assets between different things, but if it’s using multiple
levels, what you’ll see here is it’s not just contained
to just this level, you’re also seeing other levels
that it can be used in as well. So, for tracking down issues especially
if you get late in a project and you’re trying to slim
it down and you’re trying to get
rid of things, and you’re like, hey, we’ve been working on
this project for like two years. I don’t need like half
these Assets anymore and I want to just start
getting rid of them. But you constantly get
those reference redirects and it’s like, oh, this is referenced on
this Asset and all this stuff. If that ever starts
to give you issue, you can start to use this
to track down some of those and kind of see where
everything is being referenced. Another one, let’s do this real
quick too. Let’s select an Actor
in the world. Actually, let’s select him
in the- disable my recently opened, come down here to props
and then I’m just going to select
several different props here. And then I’m going
to right click and then go to Asset
or Asset Actions. And then I’m going to go
down here to Bulk Edit via Property Matrix. So, the Property Matrix
does this thing where it contains a bunch of- let me rescale
this a little bit- it contains the Assets
that you’ve selected and then some other
additional information. So, it’s like
if I select on each one on the right side over here, we have settings
that are relevant to that one. And these are going back
to the base Asset in this case. So, these are original
import settings. If I ever want to change those, instead of opening up
the Static Mesh Editor and then going through
the Details Panel and finding those settings,
I can do this as well. Show you what the
collision is set as, some of your level details. You’re not going to find
every property setting in here. Like for instance, you’re not
going to find Materials in here, but it’s like you’ll find
some that are relevant to you. And it depends on the Asset,
what properties are available. But the cool thing about it too
is if I select some of these, like you’ll notice there’s pins
over here on the side. Let’s just say I want Lightmap
resolution on those. It’ll show me
the Lightmap resolution for these Static Meshes
and everything. Whether it’s allow for-
things start to overlap, so you have to expand
memory menus again, but you can start to see
some of these things and maybe a quicker way
to edit things for you.>>Victor: And to give you
an overview of all.>>Tim: And to give
me an overview. There’s also another way
to get an overview. So, since you said that, I’m going to go share
this real quick.>>Victor: See, this is why
the stream is taking longer.>>Tim: This is why
it’s taking longer. Because like we can always
just kind of- I was going to show this
at some point anyway, but I always plan these
to go like, like oh man, I’ll go really quick. But if we go to Window here
and then Statistics, I use this one all the time
for static lighting builds. It can be used
for more than that. So, it gives you
the primitive stats. So, any of the objects
that I have in the world, like you’ll notice there’s a whole lot
of things listed here. And then these are, when I
select them too, it’s going to- Alright. Don’t know why it’s
opening up the Content Browser. A second ago, it was highlighting
the Word Outliner.>>Victor: Maybe it’s
overlapping.>>Tim: Maybe.
But there’s anyways- on that there’s, there’s
a number of settings in here, so it’s like
the primitive stats. It’ll show you
any of the objects in the world. The Lightmap that it stored,
the triangle count that it has. Just a whole bunch
of information. The way I use it for, if you’re interested
in your Texture stats, you can kind of see
those as well. The static lighting information.
I’ll show these is really quick. The light build info is one.
There’s none here right now because we haven’t built
lighting on this machine yet. It’s a project that comes
with built lighting. But what you would see here is what Assets
took the longest to build. And for people
that are just like, Oh I created a Lightmap
resolution, but man, it’s just
stuck on 0% or whatever. This is the first thing
that I come and check whenever I’m doing
those kinds of things and something’s getting hung because it’s typically
one or two Assets. They have a lot of light
interaction and they have
a high Lightmap resolution. So, it takes them
longer to build. And it’s like that one
or two or several Assets that are holding up
your build process where everything
else might finish. But that’s a good place
to check. And then the static
lighting info. This is just more like
high level for the Asset itself. So, it shows you the resolution
for Lightmaps that is set. And then it shows you
some of the Texture information for what that will be generated
in the end and what not, and then what the Asset is and where at what level
it’s referenced in. So, in this case, the Blueprint
of this one, but yeah. Do you want to show
your thing real quick?>>Victor: Sure.
>>Tim: I can give my voice a rest.>>Victor: I realize we
didn’t plan this through entirely because we
going to have to work on the monitor
a little sideways.>>Tim: Oh yeah.>>Victor: It came up
when we were talking about the Property Matrix and I remembered
that there was a time where I wanted to apply
a default Material to a lot of different Meshes
inside the Editor. And a long time ago
that option used to exist in the Property Matrix. It doesn’t anymore because it was considered
a dangerous operation. There was some caveat there. And then with the release
of Editor Utility Widgets, I thought maybe it’s possible to
build an Editor Utility Widget that can do this for me.
And it totally is. So, let’s go ahead and move
everything around a little bit. So, if you don’t know
what Editor Utility Widgets are, they are a way for you
to script Editor functionality using Blueprints,
which can be really handy. And now I have no idea
where your Content Browser went.>>Tim: Oh, it’s closed.
>>Victor: It is completely closed. Alright, well let’s go ahead
and fix this.>>Tim: So once again, we go
to Window, Content Browser.>>Victor: Content Browser one, and then I’m going to
put it down here because that actually
works for me. Alright. And I actually like
to go View Options and then I go List View.>>Tim: Oh yeah.>>Victor: Because then
this, yeah, I prefer this. I even,
I’ll never edit all this. I like to put it down here
or over there. It doesn’t really matter.
We’ll keep it here to stay consistent
with what Tim’s been doing. I don’t really need
molds for this, so we can just go ahead
and do that. Let’s go ahead
and go to Content, let’s make a proper folder,
Editor Utility Widgets, simple like that. Do we have any filters
or anything? Nope, it’s all- Alright.
So, the first thing I think, Oh, alright, let’s go through
and do the basic first. So, we right click
in the Content Browser, we go to Editor Utilities,
and then Editor Utility Widget. Now since 4.23, we also have
the Blueprint option which if you were not familiar with the previous concept
of Blutilities, this is essentially
that just better. And it ties into
how you work with- so the Widgets are for what you
present in your user interface and then the Editor
Utility Blueprint can contain data and knowledge
about the scene, et cetera. So, it’s a nice way to work
with both of them, but for this use case, all we need
is Editor Utility Widget. So, we’re going to make that and let’s call it
Utility Widgets Apply Materials. So, I think I mentioned
that what I want to do here is to have the possibility
to set the default Material on any number of Static
Meshes the Content Browser. So that’s easy. So, we made it. Now, this is how if
you’ve made UMG, if you worked with UMG, it looks like this,
you get a canvas panel and you have the little graph
here where we edit. For Editor Utility Widgets, you shouldn’t really use
the canvas panel. You don’t need it because
you kind of want it to scale when you’re moving
the Editor Utility Widget around inside the viewport
and so previously, you’d have to go here in here
and you’d have to delete it. Alright,
that’s the first step. However, there’s been
a really nice new feature added that Lauren just told me about. So, I was going to go ahead
and show that off. I believe it’s Project Settings and then let’s search
for widget. And it’s called
the Widget Designer. So, let’s see. It’s under Editor,
Widget Designer. Yeah. It’s just right here. Under Editor,
Widget Designer for Team and I thought this was amazing.
Use Widget Template Selector. If you check this checkbox
and now let’s go back and delete the one that we made
and then let’s go ahead and make a new one,
Editor Utilities, Editor Utility Widget. We get this little selector here
where we can pick the default that we want
which is really neat, and so we got
all classes as well. And so, you can pick
if you want the canvas panel, I guess there’s no option
for none. That’s kind of what
I was expecting, but it’s okay. But it’s neat->>Tim: What’s your advice Lauren.
>>Victor: Maybe. I did see, so I was
playing around with this just right before we went live.
But the Default Root Widget, I’m not entirely sure
how to work with it, so I’m not going to show it off. But there seems
to be other options. Deeper resolutions,
a bunch of options there, especially I mean
if you’re a designer and you do this over
and over and over, that can be quite nice. Or if you don’t want anyone
on your team to use the canvas or you want any of the elements
to be default. Alright, let’s go ahead and F2
to name it properly, Apply Materials.
And this is pretty quick. All we need in here, first off,
delete the canvas panel. Let’s go ahead
and grab a button. Drop that in there. And as you can see now
it scales entirely too. So, no matter how I move
this around in the Editor, it will look great. And then let’s add text
to the button. We will need a text
a little bit descriptive. It can be named that. But what’s it going to say,
it’s Apply Material. Simple like that.
Let’s compile that, oh and let’s be
real proper button, not 53. It’s button Apply Material. Alright,
let’s head over to the graph. We are- It’s awesome,
I’m loving it. Yeah, it totally works.
We don’t need any of these. So, we can just go ahead
and select the button and then down here
in Details Panel, under our Events
we have On Click. So, whenever we click this, and we’re going to do
a couple of things. The first thing we want is that
we want to Get Selected Assets, which what this will do, and to showcase
this actually I’ll show it. What this function will do
is that any Assets that you have selected
in the Content Browser it knows which ones those are.
So, the function will return whichever ones
you have right there. So, we’ll do a little For Loop
to iterate through these. And then for each of these,
we want to Cast to Static Mesh and see if,
is this a Static Mesh. If it is,
we’re going to want to go ahead and add this to an array. And a nice way
to make that array, this is sort of backwards
is how you’d do it in code. You would declare
to the variable first. Here we can just add a function
and then promote to variable. So, we’ll call this
Selected Static Meshes. And the Cast is
just to make sure that we only want
the Static Meshes here because they’re the ones
we want to operate on. If this fails, we’re going
to cast to a Material Interface. And this is actually something
I had to talk to Lauren about a little bit because,
I don’t want the person, I don’t want
to have two buttons, one for Material and one
for Material Instance. I want to be able
to operate on both and not care which one it is. And Material Interface
is actually the parent class of Material Instances
and Materials. You might think that
the Material Instance inherits from the Material,
but that’s not the case. It actually inherits
from the Material Interface. And so that’s where
we want to cast. We want to know that
we’re talking to one of these. And so,
if we’re not a Static Mesh and then we cast to Material
interface, that’s what it is. We want to select this
as the Material that we actually want to apply to all of the Static Meshes
that we have and so that
it becomes a default. So, we’ll drag that out. We’ll promote that
to a variable. If it’s true, we’ll call
this Selected Material. Alright. And once this is done,
we only care about Meshes. We care about the Materials.
Once we’re completed, we’ll do another
For Loop on our selected Assets. And now I guess you could, Oh, we have unrelated notes on,
don’t we? Yes. Yeah. We can go ahead and just compile this
to Collapse to Function. Apply Materials
to Selected Static Meshes. Very descriptive,
easy to know what it says. What I probably would do here is
to grab the selected Assets and promote them
to a local variable. Local Selected Assets.
Alright. We’re almost done. And we can show
how amazing this is. I thought this helped me a lot.
We can do that right there. And then down here
we can clean it up a little. Local Selected Asset. Alright. And then on them,
we simply to want to, Material. I don’t want to cast.
Is it Set Material? I think it’s Set Material.
Set Material. No apply. I guess I do have my notes,
but that’s boring. What am I trying to operate
on here? That is set to object. Oh, we don’t want to operate
on the Assets. We want to operate
on the Selected Static Meshes.
One step too far. That happens.
Alright. Now that we are actually referencing
the correct data type, we can go apply,
it’s Set Material, and we want to set that
to our Selected Material. Get Selected Material.
Alright. And now if I didn’t screw
anything else up, we’re going to go ahead
and compile this. The tricky thing
that threw me off first when I started working
with these is that, okay, so I have my Editor
Utility Widget here. We open it up, we just get here,
like how do I get it? You right click
and then you run it. And so now we get
our own custom Editor interface that we can put anywhere. For something like this.
I don’t do it too often and so I usually hide it
somewhere over here. But let’s go ahead
and find some Assets here. What do we got? We got Meshes.
Alright. You don’t need to use
this project later, do you? Because I’m just->>Tim: No.
>>Victor: Okay, cool. Let’s go ahead and do Filters. We can do Material and then
let’s also add Static Mesh. Okay. And so now
we should be able to find, there are probably no Materials
inside Meshes, but we can go ahead and select->>Tim: Could you select the next
folder back up the Assets one?>>Victor: Okay.
>>Tim: Yeah.>>Victor: The top one.
Then we get all of them. Perfect. Alright,
so we have a little boulder, deselect that for now.
We’ll get this one out. Alright. So say if you have
a ton of Meshes and you want them all
to have the same Material instead of going in one by one, sort of setting
the default here, what this little script
does is that if we- Oh, I don’t even know
which ones I dragged in now.>>Tim: Just this.
This one right there. Yeah.>>Victor: And then can
I select all of them? No, shift B doesn’t-
Oh, it does. Okay. Awesome. So, what I did there was that
I control, click all of them, and then shift B will find
whatever you have selected in the viewport
inside the Content Browser. So, I have all them selected.
We will show Materials again- Are they going to stay selected
if I click here? It doesn’t really matter. And then we’ll select
a Material, say this blue one here,
whatever that is. Are you still selected?
I don’t know. Let’s try it. Apply Material.
No, I don’t think they are. So, let’s do what I-
because what I want essentially is to have all of them
in the same folder so that we can select them or not in the same folder,
but at least->>Tim: We’re using a
second Content Browser?>>Victor: Here. It would,
but I can also just do this. It would be easy
if I didn’t have to show it off that it actually does
in real-time. Oh Jesus. I had all selected.
Okay. So, these three, all right,
we drag them out here and make sure
these are selected. We’ll pick this Wood
Floor Material and then we’ll apply Materials and that will actually set
the default for all of them, which saves a ton of time.
And so just a quick little walkthrough
of the Editor Utility Widgets and what kind of things
that you can do with it. This was something
that I thought of and I wanted the functionality, which wasn’t in the Editor
and it wasn’t, so it just took me a couple
of minutes to put this together. I believe you can do
with Skeletal Meshes as well, and you might want
to be smart here and put in maybe
a warning or something. If you have something selected that isn’t a Static Mesh
et cetera. Now it won’t do any of
the operations on it, so it’s fine, but it’s always good
to plan a little. Now I’ve been talking,
I get a little bit dry.>>Tim: We got time to show
one more thing and then->>Victor: We do actually,
we’re not too bad with time.>>Tim: Alright. Okay. This one takes two minutes,
but it’s a 4.24 feature.>>Victor: Oh, this is the big
one. This is the grand finale. We’ve had several questions
about this one, so.>>Tim: Okay. This is grand
finale on showing stuff and then we’ll answer a couple
of questions, but, okay. So, Victor as he has
pointed out, he has messed up
my Editor workflow here.>>Victor: There you go.
>>Tim: Like drastically.>>Victor: You did
the same for me.>>Tim: So, we have this really
awesome kind of thing here now. You can actually set up your own
kind of layouts in the Editor. I tended to use this a lot.
Again, this is something that affects my workflow more
than most other people because I tend to work
out of a default Editor workflow just with the layout
and everything just because of the way
that I write documentation. So being able to quickly go back
to a default Editor workflow, it’s really beneficial for me. Gives me my Content Browser
back in the right space. It gives me everything
laid out back as if I had
just installed the Engine. So again, if we go here to
Window we have under Layouts now we have a couple
of different options. So, we have Load Layout where you can actually load
a default layout or loading any other ones
that we’ve saved and created. We’ll create one
in just a second, or we can choose
to import a layout. I was watching something Grayson
was doing the other day and I took and I went
and created his layout, which is totally fine
for his workflow, but I cannot work that way. I don’t know
where everything is. I call that one Sequencer layout because he had some really kind
of cool stuff he was showing. So, this is something that
I followed him at Unreal Academy and I was so afraid of like
messing up his workflow. I always like checking
the schedule and double checking to make sure I wasn’t going
to affect his browser layout because once you decide on that for the Engine,
you have to reset it every time. You don’t have
to do that anymore. So, I now have this imported
layout that Grayson uses here and then what you’ll notice
is that it doesn’t say I’ve imported it, but it doesn’t
say it over here at all. So, what I might need to do is,
even though it’s there, I just need to save that layout
and it’s going to go ahead and save it for my Editor
session that I’ve got here. So, I’m going to replace
that one, and then when I back
to Window and then come down here
to Load Layout, I did not save it? Let me change something first.
Let me drag that a little bit. One of the things I will do
differently than his is let’s just say
I want a floating window too, because it’ll remember those, I tend to have
a second Content Browser occasionally inside the
Details Panel that’s floating. And then I’ll come back up here
to Save Layout and just call this Tim’s layout. Then now here under Load Layout,
you’ll find that I’ve got Tim’s layout here
and then the default one. So, if I switch back and forth
between the two, I can now do this without having to restart
the Editor or do anything.>>Victor: It looks
really nice when you switch too,
I like that fade.>>Tim: So, yeah, and then
I’m going to just do this too. Slate Enable Tooltips. Kill that because
it was getting in the way. But one of the other things
you’re talking about too is like let’s just say
if I wanted to give Victor my layout for something
or let’s just say if Grayson came back on
to do another Sequencer then you wanted to-
didn’t have a project set up and you just can do everything
just like from scratch without having to spend
that five minutes, setting everything up.>>Victor: If someone
is doing a tutorial, they can share the layout so you as a user
can load us in layout so that it’s easy
to follow along.>>Tim: Yes. That’s definitely
a possibility as well. There’s the issue
you can run into, especially in people having,
tutorials and stuff like that and you know, they’re doing
different Editor layout. It becomes hard
when you have to reference, let’s just say our documentation where we’re working off
the default view because we assume that’s what
everyone’s going to start with. But with this option it’s like we have to take into
additional consideration. So, it’s like if there’s
a better Sequencer workflow and we’re showing that tutorial,
it’s easier to go, hey, download this workflow and or this layout
and import it. So, when you go
to save and export, the one cool thing about this, it’s kind of
let’s just say here, I’ve got my Details Panel open, I’m going to set this
for some defaults. Whatever, and then
when I come to save, I’m going to choose export. And when I export this, I’m just
going to call this one Victor’s.>>Victor: I appreciate you
saving my layout Tim.>>Tim: I didn’t do it
for the Details Panel because it was an Asset. Let me open up one of the Static
Mesh Editors real quick. See this is already messing
with me because I was trying
to find an object. Alright.
You know what, I’ll show you why
this thing is awesome. Back to default layout.
Now I can find things again. I did this,
I triggered it earlier, but it can save settings
for some of the settings too. So, for- I don’t know if it would
work for this, but we’ll try.>>Victor: Select import and-
>>Tim: Yeah. Let’s save that. I don’t know if it’s just can
do it on an Asset when on, but I’m still learning this one. I’m not writing documentation
for this. I don’t know this as well. But you just get to see
a little bit live me figuring things out here
for a second. Save, export, then we’ll call
this one Victor’s again. Yeah. Here we go.
So, with this one, the Preserve UI Layout Name
and Description Fields. So, what this one was saying
is essentially, it’s like I’ve changed some of those default
settings for things. If I want to preserve
those values when I send, let’s just say I’m sending this,
this layout to Victor, if I want to preserve
those values for him and he wants to take a look, I just would click
Preserve Values and then it would save
all of that stuff into the INI file
that he goes to import. If I click clear values,
all it’s just going to save, it’ll save the positions
of where everything is, but it won’t save those edited
values that I’ve added in. So just another option
that you have there. That’s all I’ve got to mention.>>Victor: That’s quite a bit.>>Tim: Yes, that’s quite a bit.
>>Victor: Yeah. Good job. Almost impaled a knuckle there. Alright. We got this.
Plenty of questions. Let’s try to go through them
as quick as we can. A few of them were about can we save the layout
or how we have our->>Tim: Yeah. Just kind of play
around with it. Because really, I mean,
it’s pretty straight forward. The remove layouts.
I didn’t show this really but, if let’s just say I never tried
to remove the default and I’m not going to do
that because I like default. You know what,
I don’t like Tim’s layout. So, let’s just get rid of that.>>Victor: And does that
actually delete the file or does it just remove it
from the context menu?>>Tim: Let’s find out.
Ask your question. I’ll pull that up real quick
and go to Show in Explorer and then I can open up mine.>>Victor:Alright. Does the
Unreal viewport support 3D mice for example, space mouse?
Not natively.>>Tim: Not natively. Someone made a plugin actually
have one of those 3D mouse a long time ago
because I used it in 3DS Max actually quite a bit
for rotating and moving around the world.
It was pretty nice. It looks like it did delete it
from my files.>>Victor: Okay. So be careful.
Pretty good. So, you might know this one,
how to select- this was before
when you were doing, showing of some of
the selection options, how to select
in viewport object, but just selection mode
without move like Q.>>Tim: To lock it? No. I don’t
think there’s an option for that. I know that’s been
a top requested feature for a long time.
I don’t know what the plan is.>>Victor: How to PIE
with the Cinematic Camera. You need to have the Cine Camera
as part of your pawn. Right?>>Tim: You’re getting
into Blueprint stuff.>>Victor: Okay. So, I know that
that’s one way to do it. Essentially you will have
to replace the camera in whichever pawn you’re possessing
with the Cinematic Camera and that way you’ll be able
to use the Cinematic Camera. I think I might’ve done that for
one of the VR streams I did. Can I snap object
to position under mouse?>>Tim: I want to say I think so, there’s-
we have some snapping options, I don’t tend to
work with a snap.>>Victor: I think
if you hold V as well.>>Tim: Yeah. So, in the docs, we do have some snapping options
that are control commands- transform Actors. Trying to remember real quick, there’s some key commands
that you can use. But we also have these settings
up here under settings and then snapping
that may work as well. I don’t think
it’s a snap under mouse>>Victor: Enable Vertex-
Yeah. And then I think holding V,
there are a couple options.>>Tim: There are a couple
that aren’t ones as part of this to enable all the time. But there’s-
I’m planning on putting my list of everything
that we’ve kind of gone over. I’m going to clean it up
and link to documentation, all the stuff that we have
documentation for in this, because, these little things, they don’t always get
their own page, but they’re just kind of,
they may be like a tip or a tool tip or something
mentioned in a page somewhere.>>Victor: We’ll make
sure to put that up on the forum announcement post.
We’ll have a link there.>>Tim: Yeah.>>Victor: And you’ll probably
tweet about it as well.>>Tim: Yeah, I’ll find that
because it’s in one of the pages. I’m sorry.
I can’t find it right away.>>Victor: Alright. Moving on. Is there a way
to spawn the selected Actor at mouse position?
Let’s say I want to spawn out a lot of the same Blueprints
on the ground. I think El Houssine has made
or is working on a plugin for Editor Utility Widgets
that will allow you to do this. And so that’s part of why
we’re developing that because people can make their
own specific custom use cases of how they want
to work with the Editor.>>Tim: I’m just going to go ahead
and highlight his page here.>>Victor: So much of
his stuff is great.>>Tim: He’s got a lot of
really kind of cool workflow and template kind of like
sample projects that he’s done. Highly recommend checking out
his site it’s UE4resources.com, I’ve talked to him on Twitter
a number of years now. Dude is just like
full of like knowledgeable, the stuff he makes
is just amazing. Like when he made this site, it’s just like
there’s tons of stuff that he just keeps adding to it.
It’s just amazing. UE4resources.com.
Yeah, definitely check it out.>>Victor: Anyway, I’ve seen that
he’s working on a plugin that allows you to have input
at Editor time in the viewport. I’m probably botching, he has probably
a much better explanation of what it can actually do. And so, some of the things
he was showing off, that combined
with Editor Utility Widgets, he was able to just click to place things
inside the scene. So, keep on following him
on Twitter and then I’m sure he’ll announce
when that is released. Let’s see. Any chance we can have
a custom entity list. We have recently
placed lights cinematic. Would be nice to have custom
categories to quickly access, organize our Blueprint Actors. A favorites
is what I’m thinking of.>>Tim: Yeah.>>Victor: Or just put them
in the right folders, use the folder hierarchy to->>Tim: I guess with
the description there, it’s like that for me would be
the favorites right now. So, View Options, Show
Favorites, and then if you’re working
with Editor, you can add whatever
the Assets are. Did it break again?
It did break again.>>Victor: Well I guess we’re
going to go file a bug report when we’re done with the stream.
Will there be any stream for the new Static Mesh Editor
from Inside Unreal? Yes. I would love to do that.
I would have to figure out who the best person
would be for that.>>Tim: Static Mesh Editor?
>>Victor: Mm-hmm.>>Tim: Wow. Okay.
I don’t know everything.>>Victor: It’s in preview now. There’s so many things.>>Tim: So many things. It’s like,
if I could just invent time,>>Victor: Let’s make it right
now. What would be the best- Okay. I like this question. What would be the best workflow
advice you guys could ever give? I know what my answer is,
but I want to hear yours.>>Tim: I want to
hear yours first.>>Victor: Source control.>>Tim: Oh yeah. I was just going
to say this stream, but, I mean, everyone has
their own kind of workflow. For me that’s a very objective
kind of like, or subjective question and it’s hard to say
because throughout the stream I’ve told you
what works well for me and that’s what a lot of this is just kind of like
some hidden things. But when something does work
for me very often, it depends on what
I’m working on and I can’t narrow it down
to just like one simple thing. But source control
is a good one, and depending on
the project size or whatever, it’s like,
for me Google Drive is a good backup thing
if I’m not using source code for just like
simple little projects. but you know, it just depends
on the person, I guess.>>Victor: Yeah,
what you like to do. Source control and scope
out your work, there’s a lot of that, I’ve been thinking of
doing another stream where we bringing on
some veterans that have been in production for many, many, many years
and what they’ve learned.>>Tim: I think I wiped it,
but even just the difference between this and this layout
that we have here and Grayson’s layout
that I’ve marked up here, that’s a completely different
workflow for the work that he does constantly
with the Sequencer and the Take Recorder here and just the way that he has all
his panels laid out, that’s a very specific workflow that’s not going to
necessarily work for everyone. It may not work for everyone
that does that type of work, but it works for him
so I think as the Engine grows, we just start to add
these features that are really kind of help you
improve that workflow. And I think Lauren does
a really good job. You know, she helped me with calling out
some stuff earlier today. You know, just like things
I wasn’t aware of that just like the recent filters and just some of the Material
stuff for the high nodes and stuff like that. It just improves
everyone’s workflow. Like she absolutely loves
doing those small little things that it’s not necessarily
this huge giant feature, but it improves your workflow and it’s like, it’s so small,
you may not notice, but when you do there’s
a little bit of seconds here and there,
it’s just amazing to get back.>>Victor: Straightened
connections. It’s so good.>>Tim: Yes. That one too.>>Victor: Let’s see. Oh, we
got plenty of questions to see. Yeah, we have a little bit
of time left. How to save that folder color. If I moved to another machine,
it is lost like, locally saved. Oh, to another machine. Okay.
So that would be part of what we were showing off
in Project Settings. Right. How you can export your- Oh but that’s specific
to the project. So, Editor Per Project
User Settings. Might that be the INI
that you actually need to->>Tim: Yeah, that’s probably
the Per Project. That’s probably
a little bit more, post that question on the forums
and let me get back to you. Because there are some things where you can go through
the INI files and you’ll have,
there was like one thing that we debated
on showing on here it’s just we’re going to
run out of time, but it’s a Blueprint kind of
like hotley kind of thing.>>Victor: Well, you know
what, it could also be? It could be that
they’re only grabbing, they’re not grabbing
the intermediate folder because you usually shouldn’t. When you- or sorry, saved
the save folder because that’s where
the settings actually live.>>Tim: Speaking of that,
let me show this real quick.>>Victor: Go ahead.>>Tim: I keep showing
another thing. Whenever you go to package up
a project if you don’t want to grab stuff that doesn’t necessarily need
for that project and I’m like that’s the saved
or the intermediate folder. it still grabs all your config,
your content and the project file.
But the Zip-Up Project is a really good one
to send to people. because the save folder tends
to have the save derived data cached and intermediate,
they can regenerate those. But this one, the saved as it
saves additional saves over time will start to really blow->>Victor: You can see
some of them there, right? The auto saves backups and such. So, this save option
will save for example, if you have a color
in the color palette, you’ve saved
some favorite colors that would bring them
with the project as well?>>Tim: I would think so.
>>Victor: Okay.>>Tim: I would think that should
bring everything because those should be in a
config folders you’re not seeing because it’s trying
to save a zip file. But if not, we can always do,
above any of your stuff, you can always export
and then re-import those.>>Victor: Is there a function
in the Engine that shows you- I think what they’re
trying to ask is if that shows
you unused Assets? No, but there’s a plugin.>>Tim: Is there a plugin?
>>Victor: Yes. I’ve seen a plugin.
I don’t remember the name of it.>>Tim: That has been a highly
requested thing too.>>Victor: Yes. There is a
plugin. I will also follow up
on the forum and post that link. I know there’s a plugin or it
was being worked on, but anyway, I’ll bring as much information
as I have regarding that. I’ll put it on the forums.
Let’s see. How would you package
an Editor Utility Widget for say selling it on the Marketplace?
Just as any other Asset. I believe.
Now I haven’t done that.>>Tim: I’m not. sure.>>Victor: And the process
for submitting to the Marketplace
I haven’t done that either, but it is just a UAsset
like anything else. And so, compared to like a
content pack on the Marketplace, it’s very similar.
You->>Tim: Just make a bunch of
Assets that you can put together and as long as they meet the style and standards.>>Victor: Correct,
of the Marketplace. Yeah. So, it would probably be as part
of a, it wouldn’t be a plugin. It would be content, right?>>Tim: Yeah.
Because it’s an Asset, right?>>Victor: Yeah. so right click,
migrate. Ooh, I almost forgot
to mention this. I saw this on Twitter
the other day. I think someone wrote it
in one of your threads, but if you want to migrate
just a couple of Assets to send to someone else
on your team, instead of making a new project
to migrate to, you can just make a folder
that’s called Content and you can migrate
to that folder.>>Tim: Right click and-
>>Victor: It’s super handy. I don’t even remember
where I read that, we were talking
about it earlier as well.>>Tim: Oh,
this is driving me bonkers. Well anyways I can show you,
so, Meshes here, this will be the same
for any Asset, same what’s it? Edit Options.>>Victor: Oh, it’s actually
right there. Bulk Operations.>>Tim: Plugin looking
like sub menus. Migrate and then
I’m just going to say not save. And what it does is,
so it gives me the game folder, is essentially
my content folder. The Assets that I’ve grabbed
are located under the Materials. It shows all the Materials
that are referenced in that Meshes folder.
It also grabs the Meshes folder. you can pick and choose
what you want, but the same thing
we were showing with that reference viewer.
If it’s referenced in something and it needs it,
it won’t grab levels, unless you specifically
select them. But since I grabbed
all the Meshes or whatever, it grabs all the Materials
and Textures that go with them. And then when I click okay, I can choose
where I save that as well. So, if I just choose Desktop,
you don’t have to call it game, I just called it game.
It’ll give you a warning that this is not
in the correct structure, but when you click yes
or whatever, it’ll go over.>>Victor: Okay. I guess I’m
a little, I tend to, alright- it’s complaining.
Let me do it the proper way.>>Tim: Yeah. So,
whenever you do get that folder it’ll give you
just the Assets folder and then it gives you
those sub folders. I’ve seen people do this a
number of times. Just drag this Assets into your
content folder, or create the content folder,
like you said and then just name
it- Because if you name it Content
and drag it in->>Victor: That just works.
This is an interesting one and I think I know
the answer to it. Is it possible to record
a camera in real time, for example,
using a joystick or so? And then they were clarifying
the camera animation. Yes. If you use Sequencer
and you add whichever Actor that camera is a part of
to be a recorded Actor, I guess we are almost
on the Sequencer in here. So we would have to set up
the Actor with the camera, but if you had an Actor
with that camera, your pawn for example and you can control the pawn
with a joystick and you select that Actor to be
a recorded Actor in Sequencer and you hit record,
you move around, that will actually be
a transform track in Sequencer and you can use
that transform track and apply it to other Actors
in a Sequencer and play it back. So, for a cinematic or something
instead of hand keying or setting up spline points
that interpolates between or however you want to do that
camera motion inside unreal, you could fly the camera
with the joystick. I’ve been touching
on different parts of how you’d be able to do that in a couple
of the streams I did. but it’s pretty straightforward. If you just follow the Sequencer
documentation then you should be able
to figure out how to do that. Let’s see. Is there a way to use a modifier
to make the Blueprint viewport move with a shortcut
plus left mouse button instead of right-clicking,
as I use the graphic tablet and hovering all the time hurts?>>Tim: I’m not sure
on that one.>>Victor: No, I don’t think
we have the option to change that in the keybinds.
Feature request. Because I’ve actually, I tried to use a graphic tablet
for Blueprints once. There were a couple
of usability issues. I just realized quickly
the same thing I was just dragging
my hand across.>>Tim: Yeah.>>Victor: There’s like
eight more that came in as we’ve been
going through these Oh, okay. Is it possible
to modify keybinds or make your own to make
something like one key press for 90-degree active rotation
or one key press for swap Actor with selected one
from Content Browser?>>Tim: I’d say just use Editor
Utility Widget or Blueprint.>>Victor: Yeah,
that’s pretty much it. And then you’ll get a button
and I think with El Houssine’s plugin later,
you’ll be able to assign a key, a key bind to- just thinking.
I think that’s the way to go.>>Tim: That would be the right, I know Mitchell has created
some stuff like that where it’s just buttons
for rotation and stuff, like when he was doing
some of his release note work on it before.>>Victor: What I would do
is change the snapping to 90 and then just move it and-
>>Tim: Yeah, that too. But I mean for your level
editors it’s not going to be 90.>>Victor: Maybe 48 degrees.
Right? Whatever you want. Can we have
a global Asset manager, like the one in Twinmotion? I have only played around
a little bit of a Twinmotion, not worked with it
in a production project, so I don’t know.>>Tim: Same here.>>Victor: Let’s see if there is
a Python UI in the plans? Not as far as I know.>>Tim: I’m not sure.>>Victor: Regarding the
Game Viewport settings, is there a way
to add custom presets?>>Tim: I’m not sure.
I don’t think so.>>Victor: I wonder
if they mean sort of like what you
were explaining?>>Tim: Yeah, like what’s there?
>>Victor: Yeah.>>Tim: If so, I’m not sure. I’ve not looked through
any INI files to see if that is just set somewhere
for those differences.>>Victor: Maybe, for all those
default things, all of these options
are part of INI files.>>Tim: Yeah. It’s probably
buried in there somewhere.>>Victor: Yeah. Somewhere.
those are all the questions I believe
that we can answer now. We’re also a little bit
over time. Tim, thanks for spending an hour
and 45 minutes with me here and going through
all these things.>>Tim: It’s been that long?
>>Victor: It has been that long. It’s almost, it’s almost four
o’clock here on the East coast, but that was fun. I hope for all of you who are
still actually watching the stream at this point, learned a couple of things
and had a good time. As always, we have a survey
that I think Amanda linked like half an hour ago
or maybe 15 minutes. Let us know how we did,
what topics you would like to see in the future
on the stream. I try to invite as many people
as possible to come here and talk about
their area of expertise, and if there might be something
that I haven’t thought of especially coming up
for next year. I have some really cool things
planned for this year and then also next year.>>Tim: Yeah, I’ll tell you,
it’s just exciting. That’s a guy who’s got
some awesome ideas.>>Victor: And so do you,
which is why you’re here with me on the stream and you’re showing off things.
Yeah. You taught me probably like 10,
12 different things today.>>Tim: Okay. So out of my 120 options
that I showed you, it’s like 10 of those were good.
Alright. I’ll take that.>>Victor: I didn’t say
they weren’t all good, but I have quite a bit
of experience with the Editor and so I have touched
on some of these things myself. All of it is great.>>Tim: Oh, absolutely.>>Victor: Especially if
you don’t know it, then it’s even better. I was going to say
something else there. I don’t know.
It’s becoming a long stream. Right. My typical outro here
that I should go through. We’d love to see
more countdown videos. we haven’t received in a while. I’d love to surface
some of you guys’ projects. Take 30 minutes of development
in the Editor, fast forward
it up to five minutes, send that together
with your logo separately and we might feature you as one of the countdown
videos for the stream. It’s kind of fun and we like
to sit and watch them as it’s counting down getting a little bit
of butterflies before the stream and it’s a good way to take your
mind off of what’s going on.>>Tim: Absolutely.
>>Victor: We should be focused on, Anyway, make sure
if you’re streaming on Twitch, use the Unreal Engine category,
follow us on social media and make sure you hit up
any local user groups if there are any in your area.
If there aren’t and you are interested
in perhaps organizing one, know some people in the area
that are interested, shoot an email
to [email protected] and we will tell you all about
what it is being a Meetup organizer, user group organizer,
Meetup user group organizer. some cool things coming there
too and soon in the future. Follow us on social media
and thanks again Tim for taking the time
to prepare the presentation. Thanks, Lauren, for filling in
on some of the details that we were unaware of
before the stream and to everyone else
that’s making amazing things with the Editor and the Engine.>>Tim: Absolutely.
>>Victor: Then next week we are kicking off the MegaJam,
which is very exciting, a full week of hopefully
a lot of you all making amazing games and
projects that we’ll get to play. So, it’s really exciting.
If you haven’t seen it, check out the list
of sponsors and prizes. We have some very nice
contributions from our sponsors this time around. A PC from Falcon Northwest
with cats on it, very exciting. I think those graphics
are about to go up now. So, spoiler alert.
super cool. And then running up,
the schedule on Twitch for what we’re doing exist
on our Twitch page. I don’t think
I’ve updated it yet for the next couple of weeks,
but that will come later today. So, if you’re ever wondering
what’s coming in the future, just go ahead
and go to the channel, our channel on Twitch and you can see it
right down there. And for that,
I think we’re done for today. So, thanks again, Tim.
Awesome. I’ll probably have you
on sooner than you think. Yeah, there’s always new things
coming to the Engine and we haven’t even started to
come up with new 4.24 features.>>Tim: I’ll go
ahead and tease it. You know, it’s like we’ve done
this for the last two releases we’ve done an Editor
smaller features stream. I’ll be back and we’ll do
another one of those.>>Victor: I really want to see
the Atmospheric Sky changes.>>Tim: That’s a top feature.
>>Victor: It is. Yeah. It’s really neat. I actually saw Ryan Brooks
at Unreal Dev Days go through it and it’s
like you heard that ohhh, in the audience.
Because it’s really cool. So be excited and we will
see you all next week. Have a good rest of your week
and weekend. Bye-bye.>>Bye.